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Full text of "Annual report of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board"

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Compliments of . . . 

Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 



HENRY H. SPRAGUE, Chairman. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 
JAMES A. BAILEY, Jr. 



l ashburton Place, 

BOSTON. 



William N. Davenport, Secretary. 



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Public Document 



No. 57 



EIGHTH ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



for the Tear 1908. 




V 



BOSTON: 
WEIGHT & POTTER PRINTING CO., STATE PRINTERS, 

18 Post Office Square. 
1909. 









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Approved by 
The State Board of Publication. 



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CONTENTS. 



PAGE 

I. Organization and Administration, 1 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes, 1 

(2) Offices and Buildings, 3 

(3) Conveyancing, 4 

II. Metropolitan Water District, 4 

III. Metropolitan Water Works, Construction, 5 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir, 5 

fa) Wachusett Dam, -5 

(&) Wachusett Reservoir, 6 

(c) Clinton Catholic Cemetery 6 

(2) Improvement of Wachusett Watershed, 7 

(3) Distribution System, 7 

(a) Arlington Pumping Station, 7 

(&) New 48-inch Supply Main for Boston Low-service District, ... 8 

(4) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Lands acquired, 8 

(5) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business, 14 

(6) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment, 14 

(7) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real Estate, 14 

(8) Claims on Account of Diversion of Water, 15 

IV. Water Works, Maintenance, 15 

(1) Operation of Works, .15 

(2) Storage Reservoirs, . 16 

(3) Distributing Reservoirs, 19 

(4) Aqueducts, 20 

(5) Pumping Stations, 21 

(6) Pipe Lines, . 23 

(7) Sewerage and Filtration Works, 23 

(a) Clinton Sewerage Works, 23 

(&) Marlborough Filter-beds, 24 

(c) Pegan Filtration Works 25 

(8) Sanitary Inspection and Work 25 

(9) Forestry, 29 

(10) Moth Suppression and Tree Protection 30 

(11) Quality of the Water, 31 

(12) The Water Supply, 32 

V. Water Works, Financial Statement 32 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments 33 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds, 34 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, 35 

(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts, 35 

(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of District and to Water Companies, 36 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works 37 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan Water Act, .... 40 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements, 40 

(6) Receipts, 46 

(c) Assets, 48 

(d) Liabilities, 48 

VI. Metropolitan Sewerage Works, 49 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System, Construction, 49 

(a) Deer Island Pumping Station Extension, . . . . . . . 50 

(&) East Boston Pumping Station Extension, 50 

(c) Stable and Locker Buildings, 51 

(2) South Metropolitan Sewerage System, Construction, .;.... 52 

(3) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Lands acquired, 53 

(4) North Metropolitan Sewerage System, Maintenance, 54 

(5) South Metropolitan Sewerage System, Maintenance, 55 



iv CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

VII. Sewerage Works, Financial Statement, 56 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments, 57 

(a) North Metropolitan System, 57 

(6) South Metropolitan System, 58 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Bonds, 58 

(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 61 

(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures 61 

(5) Annual Assessments, . 62 

(6) Expenditures for the Different Works, 62 

(7) Detailed Financial Statement 65 

(«) Expenditures and Disbursements, 65 

(b) Receipts 70 

(c) Assets, 70 

(d) Liabilities 70 

VIII. Consumption of Water, 71 

IX. Electrolysis, ' 76 

X. Legislation in the Year 1908, 76 

XI. Recommendations for Additional Water and Sewerage Loans 77 

XII. Future Work, 84 



Report of the Chief Engineer of Water Works, 87 

General Statement, 87 

Organization, 87 

Construction 88 

Wachusett Reservoir and Dam 88 

Soil Stripping 88 

Work at Wachusett Dam 89 

Improvement of Watershed, 89 

New 48-inch Supply Main for the Boston Low-service District 90 

Arlington Pumping Station, 90 

Extension of Mains 93 

Engineering 93 

Maintenance, 94 

Rainfall and Yield, 94 

Storage Reservoirs, 94 

Wachusett Reservoir, 95 

Sudbury Reservoir', 99 

Framingham Reservoir, No. 3, 100 

Framingham Reservoir, No. 2 101 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1 101 

Ashland Reservoir, 101 

Hopkinton Reservoir 101 

Whitehall Reservoir, 102 

Farm Pond, 102 

Lake Cochituate, 102 

Sources from which Water has been taken, 104 

Aqueducts 104 

Wachusett, 104 

Sudbury, 104 

Cochituate 105 

Weston " 106 

Pumping Stations, 106 

Chestnut Hill High Service, ..'..' 108 

Chestnut Hill Low Service, 109 

Spot Pond, 109 

Arlington, Ill 

West Roxbury, 112 

Consumption and Waste of Water, 112 

Quality of the Water 118 

Sanitary Inspection, 120 

Swamp Ditches and Brooks, 125 



CONTENTS. v 

PAGE 

Eeport of the Chief Engineer of Water Works— Concluded. 
Maintenance — Concluded. 

Protection of Supply 126 

Forestry, 126 

Distributing Reservoirs 130 

Weston Reservoir 130 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 130 

Waban Hill Reservoir, 131 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe, 131 

Spot Pond > 131 

Mystic Reservoir, 132 

. Fells and Bear Hill Reservoirs, . 132 

Arlington Standpipe, 132 

Pipe Lines, 133 

Venturi Meters, 134 

Pressure Regulators and Recording Gages, 134 

Electrolysis, 134 

Clinton Sewerage, . . . . . 137 

Engineering, 140 



Report of Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works 141 

Organization, 141 

Metropolitan Sewerage Districts, 142 

Areas and Populations, 142 

Metropolitan Sewers, 143 

Sewers purchased and constructed and their Connections, 143 

Cost of Construction, 144 

Pumping Stations and Pumpage, 145 

Construction, 146 

North Metropolitan System, 146 

Construction at Deer Island Station 146 

Construction at East Boston Station, 147 

South Metropolitan System, 149 

Extension of the High-level Sewer through West Roxbury, Brookline and 

Brighton, 149 

Maintenance 157 

Scope of Work and Force Employed, 157 

Capacity and Results, 161 

North Metropolitan System, 161 

Deer Island Pumping Station 161 

East Boston Pumping Station, . . . 162 

Charlestown Pumping Station 163 

Alewife Brook Pumping Station 164 

South Metropolitan System, 165 

Ward Street Pumping Station, 165 

Quincy Pumping Station, 166 

Nut Island Screen House, 166 

Cost of Pumping, 167 

Change of Pipes at Alewife Brook Pumping Station 170 

South Metropolitan Outfalls, 170 

Material Intercepted at the Screens, 170 



Appendix No. 1. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Water Works made and pending 

during the Year 1908 172 

Appendix No. 2. — Tables relating to the Maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, . 175 
Table No. 1. — Monthly Rainfall in Inches at Various Places on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1908 175 

Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1908, 176 

Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1908, . . . . .177 

Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1908 178 



vi CONTENTS. 

PAGE 

Appendix No. 2 — Continued. 

Table No. 5. — Rainfall in Inches on the Wachusett Watershed, 1897 to 1908, . . .180 

Table No. 6. — Rainfall in Inches on the Sudbury Watershed, 1875 to 1908, . . . .181 

Table No. 7. — Yield of the Wachusett Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile 

from 1897 to 1908 182 

Table No. 8. — Yield of the Sudbury Watershed in Gallons per Day per Square Mile from 

1875 to 1908, 183 

Table No. 9. — Wachusett System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1908, 186 

Table No. 10. — Sudbury System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1908, 187 

Table No. 11. — Cochituate System. — Statistics of Flow of Water, Storage and Rainfall 

in 1908, 188 

Table No. 12. —Elevations of Water Surfaces of Reservoirs above Boston City Base at 

the Beginning of Each Month, 189 

Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been drawn 

for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District, ..... 190 

Table No. 14. — Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 1908, by 

Months 191 

Table No. 15. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 1 and 2 at Chestnut Hill High- 
service Pumping Station for the Year 1908, 192 

Table No. 16. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 3 at Chestnut Hill High-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1908, 193 

Table No. 17. — Statement of Operations of Engine No. 4 at Chestnut Hill High-service 

Pumping Station for the Year 1908, 194 

Table No. 18, — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 5, 6 and 7 at Chestnut Hill Low- 
service Pumping Station for the Year 1908, 195 

Table No. 19. — Statement of Operations of Engines Nos. 8 and 9 at Spot Pond Pumping 

Station for the Year 1908, 196 

Table No. 20. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns 

supplied Wholly or in Part by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . 197 

Table No. 21. — ( Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water from the Low-service 

System 197 

Table No. 22. — (Meter Basis) Average Daily Consumption of Water from the High- 
service and Extra High-service Systems, 198 

Table No. 23. — Average Daily Consumption of Water in Cities and Towns supplied from 

Metropolitan Works, as measured by Venturi Meters in 1908, . . .199 

Table No. 24. — (Pump Basis) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan Water District, 
as constituted in the Year 1908, the Town of Swampscott and a Small 
Section of the Town of Saugus, from 1893 to 1908, 202 

Table No. 25. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Wachusett Reservoir, Clinton, 203 

Table No. 26. — Chemical Examinations of Water from the Sudbury Reservoir, . . 204 

Table No. 27. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Spot Pond, Stoneham, . . . 205 

Table No. 28. — Chemical Examinations of Water from Lake Cochituate, .... 206 

Table No. 29. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Tap at the State House, Boston, 207 

Table No. 30. — Averages of Examinations of Water from Various Parts of the Metro- 
politan Water Works in 190S, 208 

Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston from 1892 to 

1908 209 

Table No. 32. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water Works in 

1908, 210 

Table No. 33. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1908, 211 

Table No. 34. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan Water 

Works in 1908 212 

Table No. 35. — Table showing Length of Main Lines of Water Pipes and Connections 
owned and operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, and 
Number of Valves set in Same, Dec. 31, 1908 213 

Table No. 36. — Statement of Cast-iron Hydrant, Blow-off and Drain Pipes owned and 

operated by Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board, Dec. 31, 1908, . 214 

Table No. 37. — Length of Water Pipes, Four Inches in Diameter and Larger, in the 

Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, 215 



CONTENTS. vii 

PAGE 

Appendix No. 2 — Concluded. 

Table No. 38. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the Several Cities 

and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, . . . - . 216 
Table No. 39. — Average Maximum and Minimum Monthly Heights, in Feet, above Bos- 
ton City Base, to which Water rose, at Different Stations on the Metro- 
politan Water Works, 217 

Appendix No. 3. — Water Works Statistics for the Year 1908, 219 

Appendix No. 4. — Contracts relating to the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, made and pend- 
ing during the Year 1908, . . . .... . . .222 

Appendix No. 5. — Financial Statement presented to the General Court ou January 18, 1909, 227 
Appendix No. 6. — Legislation of the Year 1908 affecting the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board, 231 



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS. 

Wachusett Reservoir — Water flowing from Full Reservoir over Waste-weir, . . Frontispiece. 
Laying New 48-inch Main across the Riverway in Boston and Brookline, . . . .8 

Overflow from Reservoir down the Waste Channel, 17 

Water running down Waste Channel into River below the Dam, 17 

Forestry at SVachusett Reservoir — Three-year-old Pines in Nursery, . . . . . 29 

Forestry at Wachusett Reservoir— Nine year-old Pines planted in Pasture Land, . . . 30 

East Boston Pumping Station after Fire of April 12, 1908 — Outside and Inside, . . . 50 

Construction of High-level Sewer Extension in Brookline, 52 

Diagram showing Average Rate of Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan District in 

1908 during the Entire Day and between the Hours of 1 and 4 at Night, .... 72 
Making Connection between New 48-inch Main and Boston Water Works Main in Beacon 

Street, Brookline, : ... 90 

New Engine at Arlington Pumping Station, 92 

Diagram showing Average Rate of Consumption in Metropolitan Water District and Aver- 
age Temperature of Air at Chestnut Hill Reservoir for Each Week during 1908, . . 116 
Alewife Brook Sewerage Pumping Station — Change in Location of Brook Channel, . . 170 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



To the Honorable the Senate and House of Representatives of the Common- 
wealth of Massachusetts in General Court assembled. 

The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board established under the 
provisions of chapter 168 of the Acts of the year 1901, has already 
presented to your Honorable Body an abstract of the account of its 
doings, receipts, expenditures, disbursements, assets and liabilities 
for the fiscal year ending on November 30, 1908, and now, in ac- 
cordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of the year 
1906, it presents a detailed statement of its doings for the calendar 
year ending on December 31, 1908, being its 

EIGHTH ANNUAL EEPOET 

made since the consolidation of the Metropolitan Water Board and 
the Board of Metropolitan Sewerage Commissioners on March 20, 
1901. 

I. ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION. 

(1) Board, Officers and Employes. 

The term of office of Henry P. Walcott, M.D., expired on March 
21, 1908, and he was reappointed for the three years next succeed- 
ing. The membership of the Board has consequently remained as 
in the preceding year: Henry H. Sprague, chairman, Henry P. 
Walcott, M.D., and James A. Bailey, Jr. William N. Davenport 
has continued as secretary and in charge of the auditing department. 
Alfred F. Bridgman has been the purchasing agent, and Miss Bertha 
M. Briggs continued as bookkeeper until October 1, 1908, when 
she resigned and Miss Alice G. Mason was appointed to fill the 
vacancy. 

There are also employed in the administrative office a paymaster, 
an assistant in auditing, two general clerks, three stenographers 
and clerks, a telephone operator, a messenger, and a janitor with 
two assistants, one of whom acts as watchman. 



2 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

George D. Bigelow has been in charge of the conveyancing work, 
and he has been assisted by Miss Alline E. Marcy, title examiner. 
They have performed such general conveyancing work and made 
such further investigation of real estate titles in the different coun- 
ties as has been called for during the year, for the general purposes 
of the Board and for use in pending suits. 

The consulting engineers of the Board are Joseph P. Davis, 
Hiram E. Mills and Erederic P. Stearns, who are called upon for 
services when matters arise which require such consideration. 

Dexter Brackett has been Chief Engineer of Water Works, with 
supervision of the various departments. William E. Eoss and Al- 
fred 0. Doane have continued as Division Engineers and Benjamin 
E. Hancox as Assistant in charge of the Drafting Department. 
Samuel E. Ivillam served as Office Assistant until October 1, when 
he was succeeded in that position by William E. Whittaker. 

There has been a reduction in the engineering force employed in 
construction upon the Water Works, but a considerable addition 
has been required in the number employed upon the maintenance 
and operation of works. The average force in construction and 
maintenance during the year has included, in addition to the Chief 
Engineer, 4 department superintendents, 2 division engineers, 6 
assistant engineers, and 30 others in various engineering capacities 
and as sanitary inspectors, clerks, stenographers and messengers, 
the total force numbering 42. The maximum engineering force em- 
ployed at any one time during the year on both construction and 
maintenance was 46. 

A maintenance force, in addition to those engaged in engineering 
capacities as above mentioned, numbering upon the average during 
the year 251, has been required at the pumping stations, upon reser- 
voirs, aqueducts, pipe lines, and upon minor construction work. At 
the end of the year this force numbered 233. 

Day laborers have in addition been employed from time to time 
in connection with the regular force as their services were required. 

William M. Brown has continued in charge of both construction 
and maintenance of the Sewerage Works. He has been assisted 
during the year by Frank I. Capen, Seth Peterson and Frederick 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 3 

D. Smith, Division Engineers, who have been in supervision of 
both construction and maintenance departments, by 4 assistant en- 
gineers, and 28 others employed in various engineering capacities, 
and by 2 clerks and stenographers. 

The maximum engineering force employed at any one time during 
the year on construction and maintenance of Sewerage Works was 
34. 

The regular maintenance force required in addition for the opera- 
tion of the pumping stations, the care and inspection of the sewers 
and for other parts of the Sewerage Works, exclusive of the engi- 
neers and day-labor forces, has upon the average numbered 145. 

The whole regular force of the Sewerage Department at the end 
of the year numbered 173, of whom the Chief Engineer and 27 
assistants and draftsmen were engaged in general upon the works, 
and, of the remainder, 87 were employed upon the North System 
and 58 upon the South System. 

Day-labor forces under the supervision of the engineers and the 
immediate direction of foremen have been employed in the construc- 
tion of the pneumatic tunnel on Section 80 of the High-level Sewer 
extension in West Roxbury, in extending the piping for the salt 
water supply to the condensers at the Alewife Brook pumping sta- 
tion, in making temporary repairs to the East Boston pumping 
station, following the Chelsea fire of April 12, and in the construc- 
tion of foundations, new channels and connecting chambers in prepa- 
ration for the extension of the buildings and plant at the Deer 
Island pumping station. 

The maximum number of men employed upon contracts and upon 
day-labor construction on the Sewerage Works during the year 
was for the week ending April 5, when the number amounted to 514. 

(2) Offices and Buildings. 

The offices of the Board and of the secretary, the auditing and 
conveyancing departments, and the main engineering offices of both 
Water Works and Sewerage Works are located in the buildings 
numbered 1 and 3 Ashburton Place, at the corner of Somerset 
Street, in Boston. 

A branch office for the Wachusett Department of the Water Works 
is maintained at Clinton, and for the Sudbury Department at South 
Framingham. Headquarters of the maintenance force of the Water 



4 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Works for the northern part of the Metropolitan District are main- 
tained in the Glenwood pipe yard in Medford, where there are 
offices, shops, store-rooms and stables ; and the maintenance force 
for the southern part of the District has headquarters in like build- 
ings at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

Branch headquarters of the maintenance and repair forces of 
the Sewerage Works are maintained for the North Metropolitan 
System near the East Boston pumping station, and for the South 
Metropolitan System at the Ward Street pumping station and at 
the storage yard at Hough's Neck. 

(3) Conveyancing. 

The settlements made by the Board calling for the revision and 
bringing up to date of titles to real estate and the preparation of 
various instruments have been 20 in number. The settlements on 
account of Water Works were 16, and they aifected 595.371 acres. 
Of the Water Works settlements, 5 were for damages for deprecia- 
tion to land in Boylston, West Boylston and Sterling, comprising 
482.12 acres, and 11 were for land purchased, 112.098 acres being 
purchased in fee, and easements being acquired in 0.253 of an acre. 

Nearly the whole area of the land and easements acquired were 
about the Waushacum ponds in Sterling. After the settlements 
were effected takings were made of most of the lands acquired. 

There were 4 settlements, affecting 1.062 acres, on account of 
the Sewerage Works, 1 for the High-level Sewer in Quincy and 
3 for the Belmont extension sewer. 

Other deeds and indentures have been prepared by the convey- 
ancers, and they have been called upon from time to time to make 
investigations in answer to the inquiries from the engineering de- 
partment and also for the Attorney-General's department in connec- 
tion with suits. 

II. METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. 

The Metropolitan Water District now comprises the cities of 
Boston, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Melrose, Newton, 
Quincy and Somerville, and the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Hyde 
Park, Lexington, Milton, Nahant, Revere, Stoneham, Watertown 
and Winthrop, — in all, 9 cities and 10 towns. The District has 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 5 

an area of 171.7 square miles, and its population, as of the date of 
July 1, 1908, the date upon which calculations for the Water Works 
are based, is estimated at 989,090. 

The town of Swampscott, having an estimated population of 
5,640, although it is outside of the Metropolitan Water District, 
is supplied with water under a contract made with the Board, 
terminating on December 31, 1908. 

The city of Newton and the town of Hyde Park, however, though 
belonging to the District, do not take water from the Metropolitan 
sources, but still depend upon their own sources of supply. 

III. METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS — CONSTRUCTION. 

The total amount expended for construction, including real estate 
and other property acquired, and payment of claims on account of 
the Water Works, during the calendar year 1908, was $217,129.47. 
Of this amount, $116,581.36 was expended on account of the Wachu- 
sett Dam and Reservoir; $2,098.65 on account of the Weston Aque- 
duct and Reservoir; $4,430.54 for the improvement of the Wachusett 
watershed; $52.55 on account of the diversion of the waters of the 
South Branch of the Nashua River; $74,931.18 for construction 
in the Distribution Department; and the remainder, $19,035.19, 
for administration and other expenses. The total amount expended 
on account of construction since the beginning of the Water Works 
in the year 1895 has been $40,684,637.51. 

(1) Wachusett Dam and Reservoir. 

(a) Wachusett Dam. 

The construction work which has been done in connection with 
the Wachusett Dam during the past year has not been of great 
amount. 

In the earlier part of the year the stop-planks required for use 
on the waste-weir were made ; a railway track was laid on the 
bridge over the waste-weir ; and a small hand car was supplied for 
transporting the stop-planks when required for use. The work of 
filling and pointing the joints of the ashlar facing of the up-stream 
side of the dam was completed to elevation 405, or 10 feet above 
the full-reservoir level. 



(3 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(b) Wachusett Reservoir. 

The work of repairing and reinforcing the North Dike had been 
substantially completed in the preceding year, there remaining to 
be placed only about 600 cubic yards of riprap on the slope of the 
dike. This was accomplished in January, and in the early spring 
the final grading and seeding of the portion of the dike which had 
been repaired was done by the day-labor force. The total cost of 
repairing and reinforcing the dike was $5Y,950.82. 

The reservoir was for the first time filled to the high-water mark 
on May 10, and subsequently, on May 30, during a heavy rain, the 
water rose to the elevation of 395.31, or a little more than 6 inches 
above the regular high-water level. For portions of a few days 
water flowed over the waste-weir. 

The caving of the banks of the reservoir, especially along the 
south shore between the southerly end of the South Dike in Boyl- 
ston and Worcester Street in West Boylston, and along a portion of 
the north shore in West Boylston and Boylston, when the reservoir 
was filling with water, required considerable additional stripping and' 
removal of soil. This stripping was made for an aggregate length 
of 12,240 feet of shore line and from an area of about 3 1 /? acres. 

(c) Clinton Catholic Cemetery. 
The Board has been unable to bring to a termination the agree- 
ment made with the Roman Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of 
Springfield and the St. John's Catholic Cemetery Association, by 
which the land occupied by the old cemetery in Clinton was taken 
and the bodies removed to a new site purchased for the purpose of 
the Association in Lancaster. The Board has performed all the 
stipulations of the agreement so far as it has been able and has 
repeatedly declared its readiness, in accordance with the terms of 
the agreement, to pay to the Association the balance of the money, 
amounting to $32,096.83, due from the Commonwealth, and also 
to convey to the Association the lands in Lancaster, to which the 
Commonwealth holds title, on receipt from the Bishop of a con- 
veyance of the old cemetery lot and the release of all claims for 
damages. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 7 

(2) Improvement of Wachusett Watershed. 

The appropriation for the improvement of the Wachusett water- 
shed was limited to $5,000, and consequently no work of large im- 
portance has been undertaken. 

The buildings and dams on the sites of two mills upon the Still- 
water and Quinepoxet rivers, which had been purchased by the 
Board, have been torn down, the ponds have been drained and the 
grounds have been cleaned and graded. Four dwelling houses in 
Clinton and West Boylston upon lands which had been taken by 
the Board have also been leveled, and the premises occupied by the 
various buildings near West Waushacum Pond in Sterling have been 
cleared and graded. Some cesspools and diverting ditches have been 
built in West Boylston and Sterling in order to prevent the entrance 
of objectionable drainage into the brooks tributary to the reservoir. 

Surveys and plans have been made for improving the channel of 
the Stillwater River and also for draining a considerable tract of 
swamp land adjacent to the river in the town of Sterling. Record 
plans have been made in order to show the location of the ditches 
which have been constructed in swamps upon the watershed. 

(3) Distribution System. 
(a) Arlington Pumping Station. 

Although the Arlington pumping station had been completed in 
the preceding year, various small additions have been required in 
order to put the station into working order. The grounds about 
the station have also been graded and planted with shrubbery. 

The Allis-Chalmers pumping engine which had been installed in 
the previous year has been in constant use, but the official duty 
trials were had but recently. The duty developed by the engine 
was less than guaranteed, so that a considerable sum was deducted 
from the contract price, but the engine is entirely satisfactory for 
the purposes for which it is required. 

The second engine, of the Blake & Knowles pattern, was installed 
in the station early in the year and has since been in operation. 
The official tests show that the required duty has been attained. 



8 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(b) New 48-inch Supply Main for Boston Low-service District. 

The Legislature of 1908, in accordance with the recommendation 
of the Board, authorized the laying of a new 48-inch main from a 
point near Chestnut Hill Reservoir through Beacon Street, Harvard 
Street and Longwood Avenue, to the boundary line between the town 
of Brookline and the city of Boston, for which an appropriation of 
$190,000 was made. 

A contract for the necessary pipe was made in the latter part 
of the summer, and later one was made for the laying of the main. 
The work under the contract for pipe laying was directly begun, 
and at the end of the season the portion of the line extending from 
the Riverway near Longwood Avenue in Boston to Coolidge Corner 
in Brookline, a distance of 3,471 feet, had been laid and connected 
with the Boston pipes. The work upon the main will be resumed 
as early as possible in the current year, and its completion to the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir is expected by the end of the summer. The 
sum of $64,569.27 was expended during the year under the appro- 
priation for this work. 

(4) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Lands 

Acquired. 

The Board acquired during the past year 110.587 acres in fee, 
and easements in 0.253 of an acre. Of the land acquired in fee 
82.50 acres were situated about the Waushacum ponds in Sterling. 
8.73 acres about the Wachusett Reservoir in Clinton and West Boyl- 
ston, and 0.137 of an acre near the Sudbury Reservoir in South- 
borough. The easements acquired were in land situated in South- 
borough. 

The total area of all the lands acquired for the Metropolitan 
Water Works since the beginning of operations in the year 1895 
amounts to 16,944.417 acres, or 26.47 square miles. The number 
of takings of land made during the year was 5, all of lands supposed 
to have been already acquired by deed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



9 



List of Takings for Metropolitan Water Works for the Year 19.08. 



No. 


Location and Description. 


Former Owner. 


Recorded. 


Purpose of Taking. 








1908. 




122 


Westborough, — - southeast of East 
Main Street and both sides of the 
Boston & Albany Railroad, with 
right of way to East Main Street. 
Area, 14.96 acres in fee. 


William T. Forbes. 


April 30. 


Improvement of Cedar 
Swamp. 


123 


Boylston and Berlin, — location of 
railroad, extending easterly from 
location already taken in Boyl- 
ston to new location in Berlin. 
Area, 5.02 acres in fee, and the 
right, title and interest of railroad 
companies in 12 acres. 


Central Massachu- 
setts Railroad and 
Boston & Maine 
Railroad. 


July 13. 


Wachusett Reservoir. 


124 


Sterling, — on Waushacum Street, 


Henry B. Stone and 


July 24. 


Improvement of Wa- 




and the Sterling Center road, and 


Alice Harlow. 




chusett watershed. 




Stillwater River. Area, 81 . 79 










acres in fee. 








125 


Brookline, — from Chapel Street 
across the railroad location to the 
Brookline Parkway. Area, ease- 
ments in 0.018 acre. 


Boston & Albany 
Railroad. 


Sept. 8. 


Pipe line. 


126 


Southborough, — 10 parcels adjoin- 
ing or near the Sudbury Reser- 
voir, previously conveyed to the 
city of Boston or to the Common- 
wealth. Area, 114.869 acres in 
fee. 


Nahum F. Brewer, 
city of Boston, 
town of Southbor- 
ough, Noah Wil- 
lard, De Clinton 
Nichols, Nancy L. 
Ransom, Edna R. 
Hess, Charles A. 
Woods, James F. 
Shaw, James F. 
Chickering and 
Robert M. and 
Harry Burnett. 


Dec. 31. 


Sudbury Reservoir. 



Settlements under purchases and takings of land, for all purposes 
of the Water Works, have been effected in the past year in 9 cases, 
and for an aggregate of 113.012 acres, with the buildings thereon. 
Of these cases, 1 was on account of the Wachusett Reservoir, 1 on 
account of the Weston Aqueduct, 3 for the improvement of the 
Wachusett watershed, 1 for the Northern Extra high-service pumping 
station in Arlington, 1 on account of the Sudbury Reservoir and 1 
for the improvement of Lake Cochituate. The sums paid in all 
these settlements during the year 1908 have amounted to $18,448.39. 
In 1 of these cases the settlement has been the result of suit, and 
the total amount paid in this, the only court settlement during the 
year 1908, was $1,763.39. 

Since the beginning of operations upon the Metropolitan Water 
Works, the number of settlements effected on account of the acquisi- 
tion of lands for the purposes of the Water Works, including the 



10 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

works of water supply acquired from the city of Boston on January 
1, 1898, has amounted to 890, and under them the Board has 
acquired rights, in fee or easements, in 16,651.128 acres, or 26.017 
square miles, for which an aggregate of $18,276,297.11 has been 
paid. Only 52 of these cases have been settled by judgments ob- 
tained in court, and the total amount paid under these judgments 
has been $1,392,033.54, or less than 8 per cent, of the whole amount 
paid. 

Settlement has been effected with all owners, who have made 
claims for damages within the time allowed by the statute, of lands 
acquired either in fee or in easement for the Metropolitan Water 
Works since the beginning of operations in 1895, except in 3 cases, 
involving 1.176 acres. The settlements do not include the 69.75 
acres in Lancaster, the title to which stands in the Commonwealth 
and which the Board stands ready to convey to the St. John's 
Catholic Cemetery Association, or 40 acres in 2 parcels, owners of 
which are unknown, and 12.882 acres in 8 parcels for which the 
owners have made no claim within the time allowed by the statute, 

ISTot including the settlement with the city of Boston, which was 
effected by agreement out of court, and the settlement with the 
cities of Maiden, Medford and Melrose for Spot Pond and sur- 
rounding lands, which was made upon the basis of an award by 
commissioners, the Board has obtained settlement by voluntary agree- 
ment with 1 %8 of all the owners of the lands acquired, and almost 
1 %4 of the total amount of money paid in settlements was under 
voluntary agreement with the owners. 

The above purchases and takings do not include settlements for 
diversion of water, depreciation and other damages connected with 
lands not acquired, and in which no fee or easement has been taken. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



11 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works to December 31, 1908. 





For the Year 


1908. 


From Beginning 


of Work. 


LOCATION. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Wachusett Reservoir. 














Berlin, ..... 


- 


1 




16.700 






Boylston, .... 


- 






4,003.116 






Clinton, .... 
Holden, .... 


1.000 


1 


$950 00 


1.277.284 
167.000 


• 442 


$2,959,309 10 


Sterling, .... 


- 






797. 9S7 






West Boylston, 


- 


. 




1,683.497 


J 




Total, . . . 


1.000 


1 


$950 00 


7,945.584 


442 


$2,959,309 10 


Improving Wachusett Watershed. 














Holden, .... 


- 


1 




151.340 


1 




Sterling, .... 


94.500 


\ 3 


$12,820 90 


332.240 


1 M 


$148,890 00 


West Boylston, 


7.730 


J 


1,550 00 


72.160 


J 




Total 


102.230 


3 


$14,370 00 


555.740 


14 


$148,890 00 


Wachusett Aqueduct. 














Berlin, . . 


- 






47.815 


• 




Clinton, .... 


- 






12.310 






Marlborough, 


- 


• 


- 


51.530 


• 70 


$81,677 08 


Northborough, 


- 






89.000 






Southborough, 


- 


. 




108.660 


. 




Total 


- 


- 


- 


309.315 


70 


$81,677 08 


• Sudbury Reservoir. l 














Marlborough, 
Southborough, 


.450 
.137 


1 

} 2 

J 


$675 00 


752.430 
2,019.217 


1 


$658,993 75 


Total, .... 


.587 


2 


$675 00 


2,771.647 


155 


$658,993 75 


Improving Sudbury Watershed. 














Ashland, 


- 


- 




.630 






Marlborough, 


- 






.800 






Northborough, 

Sherborn, .... 


- 


• 


- 


178.049 
1.000 


41 


$16,522 16 


Southborough, 


- 






4.829 






Westborough, 


- 


. 




205.487 






Total, . 


- 


- 


- 


390.795 


41 


$16,522 16 



1 Including settlements made by city of Boston. 



12 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Summary of Land Settlements for Water Works, etc. — Continued. 









For the Yeak 1908. 


From Beginning 


of Work. 


LOCATION. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Clinton Sewerage System. 














Clinton, .... 
Lancaster, .... 


— 


1 


- 


5.315 

129.835 


1 

f 36 


$37,794 40 


Total 


- 


- 


- 


135.150 


36 


$37,794 40 


Weston Aqueduct. 














Framingham, 


- 






107.335 






Newton, 




- 






1.308 






Southborough, 




- 


1 


$1,763 39 


.810 


• 91 


$188,925 35 


Way land, 




1.960 1 






75.259 






Weston, 




- 


J 




295.915 


. 




Total, 


1.960 


1 


$1,763 39 


480.627 


91 


$188,925 35 


Distribution System. 














Arlington, .... 


.015 


- 




1.911 


• 




Boston, 






- 






1.359 






Brookline, 






- 






.051 






Maiden, 






- 






.158 






Medford, 
Newton, 






- 


1 


$90 00 


3.251 
5.147 


• 36 


$172,806 85 


Quincy, 






- 






5.224 






Revere, 






- 






.404 






Somerville, 






- 






.009 






Stoneham, 






- 






19.409 


. 




Total, 


.015 


1 


$90 00 


36.923 


36 


$172,806 85 


Improving Lake Cochituate. 














Natick, .... 
Wayland, .... 


2.630 
4.590 


] 


$600 00 


5.580 
4.590 


1 

) 2 


$2,200 00 


Total 


7.220 


1 


$600 00 


10.170 


2 


$2,200 00 


Spot Pond Water Works (Taking 
of January 1, 1898). 














Medford, .... 
Stoneham, .... 


- 


1 

} ' 


- 


.630 
216.000 


i ■ 


$1,214,523 63 2 


Total 


- 


- 


- 


216.630 


1 


$1,214,523 63 





















1 Does not include temporary rights in .480 acre. 

2 Includes $749.71 paid city of Maiden for supplies not part of award. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



13 



Summary 


of Land Settlements for Water Wo 


r ks, etc. - 


- Concluded. 




For the Year 1908. 


From Beginning of Work. 


LOCATION. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Area in 
Acres. 


Number 
of Settle- 
ments. 


Payments. 


Spot Pond Improvement (Takings 
of August 5, 1S99, and June 2, 
1902). 














Medford, .... 
Stoneham, .... 


_ 


1 
J 


- 


41.447 
13.100 


1 


$25,705 99 


Total, .... 


- 


- 


- 


54.547 


1 


$25,705 99 


Boston Water Works 1 (Taking of 
January 1, 18b8). 














Arlington, . . ." . 


- 


1 




1.586 






Ashland, 








- 






652.124 






Boston, 








- 






160.630 






Framingham, 








- 






663.460 






Hopkinton, 








- 






654.729 






Marlborough, 








- 






30.552 






Medford, 








- 






25.140 






Natick, 








- 






436.223 






Needham, 
Newton, 








- 


- 


- 


31.695 
78.308 


1 


$12,768,948 80 2 


Sherborn, 








- 






40.385 






Somerville, 








- 






12.426 






Southborough, 








- 






17.168 






Wayland, 








- 






177.875 






Wellesley, 








- 






139.115 






West borough, 








- 






545.912 






Winchester, . 








- 






76.094 






Woburn, 








- 


. 




.578 


. 




Total, . 


- 


- 


- 


3,744.000 


1 


$12,768,948 80 


Aggregates, 








113.012 


9 


$18,448 39 


16,651.128 


890 


$18,276,297 11 



1 Estimated areas. 



2 Includes interest. 



The settlements above enumerated include all lands acquired for 
which a complete settlement has been made, Abont 116.22 acres 
of the lands acquired and settled for have been subsequently sold 
and conveyed by the Board. 

The tables of settlements for lands acquired do not include 50.77 
acres previously owned by the Commonwealth and the areas of 
streets. 



14 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(5) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Business. 

For injury to business caused by the carrying out of the Metro- 
politan Water Act in the towns of Boylston and West Boylston and 
in portions of the towns of Sterling and Clinton, settlements were 
made during the year in 5 cases, the amount paid being $2,070. 

The number of claims of this class settled since the beginning 
of the Metropolitan Water Works has been 331, and the total 
sum paid on account of such claims has been $156,049.18. All of 
these claims except 24 have been settled outside of the courts. 

(6) Claims and Settlements for Loss of Employment. 

l\To claims for loss of employment by residents of West Boylston 
have been filed during the year. This class of claims seems to be 
finally disposed of. 

The whole number of settlements for such claims effected since 
the beginning of the operations of the Board has been 477. The 
total amount paid on account of these claims has been $85,959.65. 
All of the claims with the exception of 3 were settled without 
resort to the courts. 

(7) Claims and Settlements for Depreciation of Real Estate. 

Settlements for depreciation in the value of real estate not taken 
by the Board were effected in 5 cases : 2 on account of lands situated 
in the town of West Boylston amounting to $533.33, 1 on account 
of lands situated in Boylston amounting to $150, 2 on account of 
lands situated in Sterling amounting to $6,500, making a total for 
the year of $7,183.33. The two Sterling and one West Boylston 
cases were settled in court by voluntary agreement. The Boylston 
and one of the West Boylston cases were settled by agreement out 
of court. 

The total number of claims for depreciation settled up to Decem- 
ber 31, 1908, has been 287, and the total amount paid thereunder 
has been $285,988.24. All of these claims except 45 were settled 
out of court. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 15 

(8) Claims on Account of Diversion" of Water. 

There have been no claims settled during the year for damages 
for the diversion of water. The total sum paid under settlements 
and judgments arising under claims made on account of the di- 
version of water, since the beginning of the construction of the 
Water Works, has been $1,138,069.67. 

The sums enumerated as paid in these and in the preceding cases 
do not include amounts paid for expert services and court expenses. 

IV. WATER WORKS — MAINTENANCE. 

Dexter Brackett, the Chief Engineer of the Water Works, has 
had the general supervision not only of construction but also of the 
maintenance and operation of all of the Water Works in the Metro- 
politan System. Under his direction there have been employed as 
his assistants : Elliot R. B. Allardice, Superintendent of the Wachu- 
sett Department; Charles E. Haberstroh, Superintendent of the 
Sudbury and Cochituate Works and of the portion of the Weston 
Aqueduct above the Weston Reservoir; William E. Eoss, Division 
Engineer having special charge of matters connected with pipe lines ; 
Alfred O. Doane, Division Engineer in special charge of work at 
pumping stations. George E. Wilde, Superintendent in charge of 
the Weston Reservoir and the remainder of the Weston Aqueduct 
and of all the reservoirs and pipe lines within the Metropolitan 
District, died in July, having faithfully served the Board since the 
operation of the Water Works- began on January 1, 1898. Samuel 
E. Killam was promoted from the engineering force to fill the va- 
cant position. Arthur E. O'Neil has continued to act as Superin- 
tendent of the several pumping stations. 

(1) Operation of Works. 
The Board is now maintaining five pumping stations, two at 
Chestnut Hill, one each at Spot Pond, Arlington and West Rox- 
bury, the two sewerage pumping stations, one upon the Pegan Brook 
at Natick and the other at Clinton, the ten storage reservoirs in the 
Cochituate, Sudbury and Wachusett watersheds, ten distributing 
reservoirs and standpipes within the Metropolitan District, the Co- 
chituate, Sudbury and Wachusett aqueducts, the Clinton, Marlbor- 



16 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



ough, Pegan and Sterling filter-beds, and the 84.65 miles of distribut- 
ing main pipes. Attached to these are the various pipe yards, gate- 
houses, siphon and terminal chambers and other structures, dwellings 
for attendants and various other buildings used or held for operating 
purposes. The Mystic pumping station and Mystic Aqueduct have 
not been in active operation during the year. 



(2) Storage Reseevoies. 

3 th 
water collected for the Metropolitan Water District 



The following are the reservoirs maintained for 



Cochituate watershed : — 

Lake Cochituate, including Dudley Pond, 
Sudbury watershed : — 

Sudbury Reservoir, . 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2, 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, 

Ashland Reservoir, . 

Hopkinton Reservoir, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Farm Pond, 
Wachusett watershed : — 

Wachusett Reservoir, 

Total, .... 



the storage of 



Capacity in 
Gallons. 

2,242,400,000 

7,253,500,000 

287,500,000 

529,900,000 

1,180,000,000 

1,416,400,000 

1,520,900,000 

1,256,900,000 

167,500,000 

64,968,000,000 
80,823,000,000 



These reservoirs have a total normal capacity of 80,823,000,000 
gallons. Individual reservoirs have at certain periods actually held 
in storage quantities exceeding their normal capacities. The larg- 
est quantity held in storage at any one time during the year by all 
of the reservoirs was 80,542,000,000 gallons. 

The heavy rains at the end of the preceding year had made the 
quantity of water in storage at the beginning of the year 1908 much 
larger than at any previous time, the reservoirs then containing 
65,856,900,000 gallons. During the earlier months of the year 
there was a continual gain in the quantity in storage, so that from 
May 1 until June 1 all the reservoirs w T ere practically full, the 
maximum quantity of 80,542,000,000 gallons having been reached 
on May 24. Owing to the small amount of rainfall during the suc- 
ceeding seven months of the year there was a continual loss in 
storage, amounting to 21,547,000,000 gallons, so that on January 








J_lJ_J-. i— i— 4 




OVERFLOW from RESERVOIR down the Waste Channel. 






WATER running down WASTE CHANNEL into River below the Dam. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 17 

1, 1909, the total quantity was but 58,890,300,000 gallons, or 6,966,- 
600,000 gallons less than that contained in the reservoirs at the 
beginning of the year. This smaller quantity of water in storage 
on January 1, 1909, would, however, be sufficient, even at the pres- 
ent rate of consumption, to supply, without additional rainfall, the 
demands of the District for a period considerably exceeding one year. 

At the beginning of the year the Wachusett Reservoir had been 
filled up to a height 10.69 feet below the high-water level, but there 
was a continuous rise in the elevation of the water during the early 
months and the high-water level was attained on May 10. By the 
use of flashboards the elevation of 395.31 was reached, when the 
reservoir contained 65,197,200,000 gallons. On some days between 
March 10 and June 2 water was allowed to run over the waste-weir 
and down the waste channel into the river below the dam. After- 
wards the water was almost constantly drawn down, and on Decem- 
ber 31 the reservoir contained only 46,176,000,000 gallons, having 
an elevation of 379.87, or 15.13 feet below the high-water level. 

Various improvements have been effected in connection with the 
maintenance work upon the reservoir. Additional pipe wells have 
been driven through the soil of the North Dike and into the under- 
lying sand in order to obtain measurements of the ground water in 
different parts of the dike. Portions of the slopes of both the north 
and south dikes have been given dressings, or plowed and seeded with 
grass. Considerable cleaning was done on that portion of the reser- 
voir bottom which was above the water level of 1907, and the bushes 
and roots and other organic matter, which had been left remaining, 
were removed as the water subsided. The strong action of the 
waves had impaired the riprap along portions of the shore and also 
some of the higher embankments which skirted the reservoir, so 
that considerable protection and reinforcement of riprap has been 
found necessary. It was found that the embankments of the rail- 
road which passes through the extreme upper end of the reservoir 
at Oakdale had suffered a considerable settlement by being sub- 
merged on the filling of the reservoir. The restoration of the em- 
bankments and of the tracks to grade was done by the Boston & 
Maine Railroad under an arrangement with the Board, the expense 
being borne by the Commonwealth. 

At various places on the marginal land fences have been built 
upon the line between the Commonwealth's land and that of the 



18 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

adjacent owners, each side paying one-half of the expense. The 
various dwelling houses and other buildings connected with the res- 
ervoir work and the Clinton filter-beds have required considerable 
repairs. 

The sale of the standing grass upon the lands of the Common- 
wealth surrounding the reservoir yielded the sum of $2,442.75. 

Sudbury Reservoir was, by the introduction of the water from 
the Wachusett Aqueduct, kept nearly full or overflowing during all 
but about a month and a half of the year, when the water was drawn 
down somewhat for a special purpose. During the larger part of 
the months the water was permitted to flow over the crest of the 
dam into Framingham Reservoir No. 3. 

By arrangement made with the selectmen of the town of South- 
borough an earth dam was built across an arm of the reservoir, which, 
400 feet in length with a maximum width of 60 feet, is situated 
east of Maple Street and on the northeasterly portion of the reser- 
voir, in order to afford a swimming pool for the inhabitants of the 
town. Water is admitted to the pool from the reservoir and is 
carried by a pipe to a filter-bed, whence it flows into a brook lead- 
ing to Framingham Reservoir No. 3. The town purchased the land 
for the location of the filter-beds and paid the expense of all pipes 
and other materials used in building the pool and filter-beds. This 
action was taken by the Board in consideration of the fact that the 
waters of this town had been entirely taken for the Metropolitan 
Water Works. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3, which receives the overflow from 
the Sudbury Reservoir, was kept full or nearly full during the year. 

The water in Lake Cochituate was kept at nearly high-water mark 
during the first half of the year, and subsequently was but little 
drawn down, the water standing at the end of the year only 2.58 
feet below high water. The replacing of land bounds which had 
been removed and the setting of bounds in the places where none 
had existed, in order to mark the line of the Commonwealth's prop- 
erty surrounding the lake, was completed, so that now the marginal 
line is throughout well marked by stone bounds, although fences 
have not been erected between the Commonwealth's lands and those 
of private owners. 

Various minor repairs and improvements have been effected in 
the different storage reservoirs. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



19 



An average of 107,502,000 gallons of water per day was drawn 
from the Wachusett Reservoir, but all of this was conveyed through 
the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sudbury Reservoir, from which 
and from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 (which receives the over- 
flow from the Sudbury Reservoir) the waters of the Wachusett sys- 
tem and of this portion of the Sudbury System are conveyed into 
the Metropolitan District. An average of 29,965,000 gallons per 
day was drawn directly from the Sudbury Reservoir through the 
Weston Aqueduct, and from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 an aver- 
age of 94,256,000 gallons per day was drawn through the Sudbury 
Aqueduct. In addition, an average of 4,027,000 gallons per day 
was drawn from Lake Cochituate through the Cochituate Aqueduct. 
The Spot Pond drainage area also furnished 82,570 gallons per day. 

No drafts to supply the district were made during the year from 
Framingham Reservoir No. 2 and the Ashland,. Hopkinton and 
Whitehall reservoirs, a small quantity drawn from Framingham 
Reservoir No. 2 being used in cleaning the Sudbury Aqueduct. All 
of these reservoirs were kept substantially full throughout the year, 
although their water was not used for the district, the water re- 
ceived from the other sources being of a preferable quality. Fram- 
ingham Reservoir No. 1 and Farm Pond are seldom used for the 
direct supply of the District, though the town of Framingham, dur- 
ing the greater part of the year, has drawn a large portion of its 
supply from the filter gallery built in connection with Farm Pond. 



(3) Distributing Reservoirs. 
There are eight distributing reservoirs and two 
situated within the Metropolitan District, having a 
of 2,381,230,000 gallons, as follows: — 



Spot Pond, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 
Weston Reservoir, 
Fells Reservoir, . 
Mystic Reservoir, 
Waban Hill Reservoir, 
Forbes Hill Reservoir, 
Bear Hill Reservoir, 
Arlington Standpipe, . 
Forbes Hill Standpipe, 

Total, . 



standpipes, all 
total capacity 



Capacity in 
Gallons. 

1,791,700,000 

300,000,000 

200,000,000 

41,400,000 

26,200,000 

13,500,000 

5,100,000 

2,450,000 

550,000 

330,000 

2,381,230,000 



20 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

These reservoirs are kept substantially full, not only for facili- 
tating the distribution of water to the various portions of the Metro- 
politan District, but also in order to afford protection in case of 
emergency. If, from accident or otherwise, the storage reservoirs 
were all cut off from connection with the District there would be 
held in storage seldom less than 15 or 16 days' supply. 

There have been the ordinary repairs as well as the regular main- 
tenance work upon all of the reservoirs and the buildings and 
grounds which are connected with them. The large number of 
people who visit the grounds of the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, espe- 
cially on evenings, Sundays and holidays, necessitated larger ex- 
penditures for the keeping of these grounds in order and for main- 
taining them in a sanitary and orderly condition, as well as in a 
condition which shall afford a proper use by- the public. Consider- 
able improvements have been required in the house occupied by the 
Superintendent of Pipe Lines and Reservoirs, near the Mystic pump- 
ing station. 

The presence of large numbers of gulls and ducks upon the reser- 
voirs, especially Spot Pond and Chestnut Hill Reservoir, has become 
threatening to the purity of the water. The attempts which have 
been made to drive away these birds have not been successful, and 
the matter has been referred to the attention of the Legislature, 
as appears in the report to the Legislature already presented. 

(4) Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct and the Sudbury Aqueduct have been 
in operation during the year, having been closed as necessary for 
cleaning the aqueducts. The former was in operation on 310 days 
during the year and the Sudbury Aqueduct on 360 days. The 
Weston Aqueduct was in service on every day of the year, no clean- 
ing having been required. The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 
on 108 days. 

Owing to the disintegration by frosts and to other causes, some- 
what extensive repairs were required upon the masonry of the 
Waban bridge, which supports the Sudbury Aqueduct, the bridge 
having been constructed over thirty years ago. There has been the 
ordinary maintenance work performed upon the aqueducts and the 
grounds which are occupied in connection therewith. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 21 

(5) Pumping Stations. 

All the water supplied to the Metropolitan District through the 
Sudbury and Cochituate aqueducts is pumped at the high and low 
service pumping stations at the Chestnut Hill Reservoir. The re- 
mainder of the water supplied was delivered to the District by 
gravity through the Weston Aqueduct. Thus 76 per cent, of the 
water supplied is pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir and the remaining 24 per cent, is supplied by gravity 
either to Spot Pond or to the main pipe lines. Erom the Chestnut 
Hill low-service station water is pumped not only to the lower por- 
tions of the District but also to Spot Pond, and from the Spot Pond 
station as well as from the Arlington and West Roxbury stations 
water is pumped into the higher regions embraced within the Dis- 
trict. 

The total quantity of water pumped during the year was 39,210,- 
596,400 gallons, which was 2.6 per cent, more than the quantity 
pumped during the preceding year. The total cost of operating 
all the stations was $119,201.12, or $3,044 per million gallons 
pumped, — an increase of $0,107 over the cost of the preceding 
year. A part of this increase is due to the larger amount paid for 
labor, the increase in wages made in the preceding year having 
applied only to a portion of the year. The cost of fuel was also 
slightly greater than in the preceding year. 

The total amount of coal purchased during the year for use at 
the various stations was 12,675.02 gross tons. Of this total, 
8,536.65 tons were bituminous, 382.99 tons anthracite, 2,988.95 
tons buckwheat anthracite, and 766.43 tons were anthracite screen- 
ings. The average price per gross ton for the bituminous coal at 
the several stations varied, chieflv on account of differences in cost of 
transportation, from $3.93 to $5. The average cost of the anthracite 
coal was $7 per gross ton, of the buckwheat anthracite $2.77, and 
of the anthracite screenings $2.33. 

Tests are constantly made at the different stations not only to 
determine the heating value of the coals and the percentage of 
volatile matter and ash contained, but also to determine the vis- 
cosity, specific gravity and burning point of the oils which are used. 
During the year 134 samples of coal and 32 samples of oil were thus 
tested. 



22 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc, 

The cost per million gallons of water raised one foot was, for 
the Chestnut Hill high-service station, $0.030 ; for the Chestnut 
Hill low-service station, $0,032; for the Spot Pond station, $0,037; 
for the Arlington station, $0,114; and for the West Roxbury sta- 
tion, $0,205. The average cost at all the stations of raising one 
million gallons of water one foot high has been $0.0351, — an in- 
crease of nearly 7 per cent, over the average cost of the previous 
year. There has been a considerable increase in the quantity of 
water pumped at all of the stations except that at Spot Pond, where 
there was a considerable decrease, owing to the decreased consump- 
tion of water in Melrose and in other portions of the high-service 
district. 

As the new Blake engine was not until February 15 delivered 
and put into operation in the new Arlington pumping station build- 
ing, the engine in the old station was kept ready for use until that 
date. Subsequently the old station was torn down and the grounds 
graded and seeded. There was a large increase, amounting to more 
than 20 per cent., in the quantity of water pumped at this station 
during the year, an increase which was almost entirely due to the 
increase in the quantity consumed in the high-service district of 
Arlington. 

There has been an increase of more than 7% per cent, in the 
quantity pumped at the West Roxbury pumping station. It has 
been necessary at times to operate both of the pumps at this station 
to their full capacity in order to supply the demands made upon 
this portion of the system. It was originally contemplated that the 
high-service district not only of West Roxbury and of Milton but also 
of Hyde Park and Newton would have to be provided for, and it has 
been expected that for the permanent supply of these districts a pump- 
ing station will have to be erected. As no supply has been called 
for by either Hyde Park or Newton the arrangement was made 
temporarily with the city of Boston by which a small pumping sta- 
tion and machinery in West Roxbury belonging to the city should 
be leased and operated by the Board. The present pumping plant is 
now taxed to its utmost safe capacity. As the arrangement must 
necessarily last some time longer, it is proposed to construct a small 
addition to the present pumping station and to install there the engine 
formerly used by the city of Melrose at Spot Pond, which is now 
stored by the Board, and to supply a new boiler. It is estimated that 
the entire expenditure will not exceed $7,000. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 23 

(6) Pipe Lines. 

The pipe lines maintained by the Board, through which the water 
is distributed to the various cities and towns, aggregated in length 
at the end of the year 84.65 miles, and the length of the various 
mains 4 inches and more in diameter connected with the Metropoli- 
tan system, but owned and operated by the several cities and towns 
which were supplied by the works, was 1,484.2 miles. 

There were two breaks during the year, one upon the high-service 
main in West Roxbury and the other in a main in Somerville. 
Both of the breaks seem to have been due to a settlement of the 
pipes where they had been laid in trenches and not properly pro- 
tected, so that the pipe was allowed to rest upon points of a rocky 
ledge. In both cases considerable volumes of water escaped and 
the surfaces of the streets in the vicinity were washed. There were 
20 smaller leaks in the pipe lines maintained by the Board, due to 
defective leaded joints. 

It has been necessary to relocate the 36-inch main crossing Wash- 
ington Street at Forest Hills in West Roxbury, on account of the 
construction work of the Boston Elevated Railway Company, but 
the cost of this work, amounting to $2,473.51, was paid by the Com- 
pany. 

The ordinary general repairs have been required during the year, 
and some additional pressure regulators and recording gages have 
been called for. The care and readings of the Venturi meters and 
of the various gages required to determine and regulate the con- 
sumption and flow of water in the different municipalities add 
considerable to the work of maintenance. 

(7) Seweeage and Filtration Works. 
(a) Clinton Sewerage Works. 
The quantity of sewage received at the Clinton pumping station 
from the Clinton sewers was less by about 9 per cent, than that 
received during the preceding year, the decrease in quantity being 
undoubtedly due principally to the smaller amount of rain which 
fell during the year, inasmuch as after heavy rainfalls great quanti- 
ties of ground water reach the sewers of the town. The total quan- 
tity of sewage pumped upon the filter-beds was 787,000 gallons. 



24 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The character of the effluent from the filter-beds has not been 
satisfactory for several years, and during the past two or three years 
investigations and experiments have been conducted under the super- 
vision of the State Board of Health for the purpose of increasing 
the efficiency of the filters. It seemed probable that the quantity 
of sewage applied to individual beds had been too great to permit 
the proper oxidation of the sewage, so that organic matter had ac- 
cumulated in the interstices of the filtration material. Other causes 
of the inefficiency were thought to be the uneven distribution of 
sewage on the surface of the beds and the insufficient underdrainage. 
An attempt has been made to remedy these troubles during the year. 
The eight settling basins into which the sewage is first pumped 
have been used continuously in rotation during a part of the time, 
two of the basins being used together for four weeks and at other 
times for one week. The filter-beds have been used in rotation 
continuously, each receiving sewage for about one-half hour once in 
two days. The laying of additional underdrains has been begun, 
while portions of the old underdrains have been cleaned and relaid. 
The area of the filter-beds is also to be increased by utilizing about 
three acres of additional ground. 

The total cost of pumping the sewage was $3,158.87, which is 
considerably less than the cost of last year, — a reduction due not 
only to the smaller quantity of sewage, but also to the fact that 
fewer repairs were found necessary. The cost per million gallons 
pumped was $10.96, as against $14.47 last year, and the cost per 
million gallons of sewage raised one foot was $0.22, as against 
$0.28 last year. There was, however, a slight increase in the cost 
of maintenance of the filter-beds, which amounted to $3,147.87, 
the cost per million gallons treated being $10.92. 

The sludge accumulating in the settling basins was in the earlier 
portions of the year, as heretofore, given to the neighboring farm- 
ers, but later it was used as a fertilizer upon the lands about Wachu- 
sett Reservoir and upon the slopes of the South Dike. 

(6) Marlborough Filter-beds. 
The basin and filter-beds which have recently been constructed 
to receive any overflow which might come from the Marlborough 
main sewer during freshets showed a successful operation, and there 
was no overflow from them or from the Marlborough Brook filter- 
beds into the reservoir during the year. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 25 

(c) Pegan Filtration Works. 

The total quantity of water pumped upon the Pegan niter-beds 
was 265,725,000 gallons, of which 173,448,000 gallons were received 
from the Pegan Brook and 92,279,000 gallons from the intercepting 
ditch which collects the water formerly draining into that part of 
Lake Cochituate which was called the Pegan Brook Meadow. The 
pumping station was in operation on 179 days and the amount of 
sewage daily pumped was 766,000 gallons. 

An improvement was effected in the receiving reservoir, and the 
pumping station was given a complete painting. 

The cost of operating the pumping station and of the maintenance 
of the filter-beds, grounds and ditches was $2,740.08, a cost per 
million gallons treated of $10.31, which is a slight increase over 
the cost of last year, owing to the more thorough cleaning which 
was required. 

(8) Sanitary Inspection and Work. 

William W. Locke, C.E., has had the help of two assistants in 
the sanitary inspection of the watersheds. In addition, a force, 
varying according to the time of the year from 3 to 12 men, has 
been employed to patrol the several reservoirs in order to protect 
the property of the Commonwealth and to enforce the regulations of 
the Board for the prevention of the pollution of the water. 

There were but 4 cases of typhoid fever reported in the several 
towns upon the Wachusett watershed, and upon the Sudbury and 
Cochituate watersheds there were 24 cases of typhoid fever, the 
number in all the watersheds being less than that of last year. 
There was an epidemic of dysentery, however, in Natick, which re- 
sulted in 20 deaths out of 118 cases. There were 3 cases, but no 
deaths, reported in South Framingham. In all of the cases precau- 
tions were at once taken to prevent any pollution of the water sup- 
ply, and no such pollution resulted so far as known. 

The number of premises upon the Wachusett watershed inspected 
during the year was 1,458. These premises were inspected for the 
purpose of ascertaining the number of cesspools and the condition 
of the cesspools and of the privies, sink drainage, manure heaps and 
manufacturing wastes. Of the total number of premises inspected 
1,363 were reported as satisfactory at the end of the year and 95 
cases pronounced " unsatisfactory." The term unsatisfactory was 



26 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

applied not only to cases producing a pollution of the water supply, 
but also to cases where, under most unfavorable conditions, there 
might be wash from privies or direct sink drainage or entrance of 
manufacturing wastes, including cases where attempts had been 
made for purification. Remedies for defects which were found 
were effected in 17 cases and 7 cases were partially remedied. 

The number of cases inspected upon the Sudbury and Cochituate 
watersheds was 7,542. Of these, 7,224 were found to be in satis- 
factory condition and 318 were reported u unsatisfactory " at the 
end of the year. Upon the Sudbury watershed 51 cases were reme- 
died by sewer connection, and 71 upon the Cochituate watershed 
were so remedied. Remedies were effected in 10 other cases upon 
the two watersheds, and partial remedies were made in 22 cases, 
while there were 106 cesspools abandoned on account of sewer con- 
nections. 

An arrangement was entered into with the selectmen of the town 
of Eramingham for the construction of a covered channel in place 
of the open ditch which had been formerly used for the flow of 
water from Farm Pond to Beaver Dam Brook, and also for cleaning 
out and improving the brook channel for a distance of 2,700 feet. 
This work of removing a sluggish ditch which had during recent 
years collected much objectionable refuse, and also of improving 
the channel of Beaver Dam Brook, w T as substantially completed, and 
under the arrangement the Board has agreed to pay $2,500 on its 
part toward accomplishing the desired results. 

The drainage ditches in the swamps, having on the three water- 
sheds a length exceeding 36 miles, have been cleaned, and where 
required have been repaved and otherwise repaired. As a result 
of the construction and operation of these ditches the color of the 
water flowing from the larger swamps has greatly improved. 

A lot of land in South Eramingham, which had been for several 
years used as a dump for refuse material, had required constant in- 
spection for the purpose of preventing the dumping of objectionable 
matter in proximity to Beaver Dam Brook, although the dump was 
about two miles from the outlet of the brook into Lake Cochituate. 
Arrangements have finally been made with the owners of the land 
by which no objectionable material will be dumped in the immediate 
vicinity of the brook where any pollution would be caused. 

Eor the cutting of ice on Eramingham reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 27 

and upon the Sudbury and Whitehall reservoirs and Dudley and 
Waushacum ponds permission is made necessary, and a . notice of 
the time and place of the cutting proposed is required. Agents of 
the Board are detailed to inspect the work, and a fee not exceed- 
ing $5 a day is imposed. This fee, however, may be divided between 
various parties who are doing the work at the same time and at 
places near together. 

Samples of water collected from the various storage and dis- 
tributing reservoirs and their various feeders are sent at semi- 
monthly or monthly periods to the State Board of Health for 
chemical analysis. The water from the various reservoirs is also 
examined microscopically and for color, odor, taste and turbidity at 
the laboratory of the Water and Sewerage Board as often as once 
a week, and a monthly examination is in like manner made of the 
water from the various main feeders of the water system. Constant 
biological examinations are also made in the laboratory of the water 
taken from the various sources of supply. The laboratory of the 
Board has made during the past year 2,459 microscopical, 1,215 
biological and 8 chemical examinations. 

In accordance with the policy adopted in the year 1906 and con- 
tinued in 1907, boating was permitted during the past year upon 
the southerly and middle sections of Lake Cochituate under restric- 
tions and regulations for the protection of the water from consequent 
pollution. No boating or fishing, however, was allowed upon the 
northern section of the lake, from which the water is delivered di- 
rectly into the Cochituate Aqueduct. A further condition was made 
that neither the owner of the boat registered nor any licensee should 
use the boat in connection with any camp or tent or any structure 
temporarily set up on land adjacent to the marginal land of the 
Commonwealth. It was provided that boats might be used not only 
by the owner who received the registration but also by such relatives 
as properly constituted members of the owner's family. No such 
licenses for use of a boat were granted to children under the age of 
sixteen years. It was distinctly made a condition of the registra- 
tion that in all cases the owner or a licensee should be in charge of 
the boat when in use, although the rule did not prohibit others from 
accompanying the owner or licensee. It was also determined to 
grant no licenses to motor or sail boats unless they had received regis- 
tration the previous years. As in previous years, registration was 



28 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

granted only to residents of Natick and of the village of Cochituate 
in Wayland, the towns in which the lake is situated, and the owners 
or licensees of cottages whose ownership or leasehold interest was 
prior to March 1, 1906. 

Applications for registration of boats were received to the number 
of 172, and of these, 152 registrations were granted. Of those 
whose applications were granted 118 were residents of Natick, 14: 
residents of Cochituate and 20 owners or licensees of cottages. The 
boats for which registration was granted included 13 motor boats, 
3 sail boats, 66 row boats and 70 canoes. Twenty-one applications 
were rejected for reasons that the applicants were residents of towns 
not situated on the lake, or not possessed of cottages prior to March 
1, 1906, or because applications were for motor or sail boats not 
previously registered, or because registration had been granted to 
other members of the same family. Permission was given for 3 
tenders to be used only in connection with the sail and motor boats. 
No request for registration, except in one instance where the ap- 
plication was made after the time of filing applications had expired, 
was refused to residents of the territory immediately surrounding 
the lake or to those who were owners or licensees of the adjacent 
cottages prior to March 1, 1906. There were, in addition, 218 
licenses granted under the regulations for the use of boats in connec- 
tion with the owners. The registrations of 4 boats were revoked 
because the owners violated the conditions under which the licenses 
were issued by permitting the boats to be used in charge of un- 
licensed persons. 

The Board has maintained a motor boat, which has been of great 
service in patrolling the lake and in seeing that the regulations 
adopted by the Board were complied with, as well as generally pro- 
tecting the lake from pollution. Careful inspection and patrolling 
have been provided as well upon the shores. All owners of cottages 
on land surrounding the lake were strictly required to keep the 
premises abutting the shore margins in good sanitary condition. 

During the year 8 new cottages were built on the adjacent land, 
while 1 was burned and 2 joined together, so that the number lo- 
cated around the lake at the end of the year was 65. 

The Board was forced to adopt restrictions upon the use of the 
lake by the public on account of the rapid increase of boating, its 
use for boat races, the building of club houses, the occupancy of the 





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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 29 

nearer lands for camping and the attempted sale of lands near the 
lake for picnic resorts and the sale of small lots for summer cottages, 
causing a permanent menace to the purity of the waters for a water 
supply. It had sought, so far as it seemed possible or practicable, 
to permit those who had before naturally used the lake for boating 
to continue such use under inspection and strict regulations for the 
prevention of pollution. The Board could have deprived the people 
of the towns and the summer cottagers of the practical enjoyment of 
the lake by prohibiting them from crossing the marginal lands be- 
longing to the Commonwealth, but no such restrictive action has 
ever been taken. It has not only sought to prevent the vicinity of 
the lake from becoming a summer and picnic resort, but has been 
making constant improvements in the sanitary conditions of the 
surroundings of the lake and the various streams which flow into it. 
So far it is believed by the Board that its waters have been kept 
from such condition as would injure their use for the purposes of a 
water supply. 

Considerable improvements are, however, contemplated to be made 
in order to ensure the waters against any objectionable condition in 
the future. 

Boating, however, upon reservoirs from which the water is drawn 
more or less directly for a water supply is generally recognized as 
undesirable and among the menaces which threaten the purity of the 
water, and it is not permitted in a considerable proportion of other 
large systems of water supply. 

Notwithstanding all the means provided for rendering boating on 
Lake Cochituate as little harmful as possible, it becomes more and 
more doubtful to the Board, from its experience and from the ad- 
vice which is given it, whether it can continue to permit, on a 
reservoir so directly furnishing a water supply, a practice which is 
pronounced to be hazardous to the health of the people of the Metro- 
politan District. 

(9) Forestry. 
An area of 212 acres of land around the Wachusett Reservoir 
was planted during the year, there being used for this planting 
253,610 white pines, 2,080 Norway spruces and 8,285 locusts. Ow- 
ing to the greater distance of these areas from the nurseries, and the 
larger proportion of swamp and sprout land, which is not so favor- 



30 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

able for planting, the cost was somewhat larger than in previous 
years, the cost of removing trees from the nurseries and planting 
them having averaged $5.50 per thousand trees, or $6.40 per acre. 
It is found that the circumstances are more favorable to the growth 
of pines than other trees, so that a much larger proportion of pines 
are now planted. 

Considerable work has been done in the cutting out of undesirable 
and mature trees and brush, in order that the growth of the young 
pines may not be interfered with. 

The brush and weeds on the 40-foot marginal fire guard and on 
the various forest roads have been mowed and burned. 

The Elagg nursery, on the south side of the reservoir, now con- 
tains 64,200 white pines and 28,300 arbor vitse. In the Lamson 
nursery, on the north side of the reservoir, there are 154,200 arbor 
vita?, 4,000 sugar maples, 2,800 ashes, 2,600 locusts, 2,170 white 
oaks, 1,150 walnuts and 54 catalpas. The transplanting of the 
maples, oaks and walnuts has not been found successful. 

Of the 3,380 acres of land belonging to the Commonwealth around 
the reservoir, 1,475 acres were forested when acquired, but of these, 
209 acres have since been improved. Trees have been planted upon 
1,330 acres, of which 488 were also cleared. There is an area of 
39 acres which it is still proposed to plant. The open area com- 
prises 536 acres, of which 197 acres are embraced in the marginal 
strip along the shores of the reservoir. 

About 4,300 pine trees have been planted on the lands around the 
Sudbury Reservoir and a few maples have been placed along the 
road leading to the Sudbury Dam. Some pine trees have been 
planted at the Weston Reservoir and at points along the Weston 
Aqueduct. 

(10) Moth Suppression and Tree Protection. 

The work done under the direction of the Board has during the 
past year been directed not only to the destruction of the gypsy and 
brown-tail moths but also to the protection of the trees from the 
ravages of the elm-leaf beetles and the pine-tree weevils. 

Owing undoubtedly to the efforts of the past few years, the num- 
ber of the gypsy moths has decreased. They are still found, how- 
ever, in large numbers about Spot Pond and along the line of the 




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No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 31 

Cochituate, Sudbury and Weston aqueducts, particularly in Newton 
and Weston. Considerable numbers were also found about Lake 
Cochituate, more generally in the vicinity of the summer camps. 
The gypsy moths have for the first time been discovered about Fram- 
ingham reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3 and about the Whitehall Reservoir in 
Hopkinton, but they have not yet infested the Wachusett watershed. 

The brown-tail moths have increased in comparison with the previ- 
ous year. They have been found not only at Spot Pond and around 
the Sudbury Reservoir, but also in increasing numbers in the vicinity 
of the Wachusett Dam and even at the upper end of the Wachusett 
Reservoir in West Boylston. 

The methods followed for the suppression of moths have been the 
same as in previous years, painting the egg clusters of the gypsy 
moths with a mixture of creosote and fuel oil, cutting off and burning 
the nests of the brown-tail moths, banding the trees with tanglefoot 
early in the spring to prevent the caterpillars from ascending the 
trees, spraying with arsenate of lead all trees which are found to 
be infested with moths, banding with burlap the trees in places 
where moths are known or suspected to be present, and destroying 
the full-grown caterpillars which have collected under the burlap. 

The elm-leaf beetles have been discovered in increasing numbers, at- 
tacking the large elm trees, especially in the vicinity of Southborough. 
Trees infested with elm-leaf beetles were sprayed with arsenate of 
lead, and the trunks were scraped from the ground to a height of 
eight or ten feet. 

The young pine trees on lands around the Wachusett and Sudbury 
reservoirs, of which about 1,000,000 have been planted during the 
past six years, were in the middle of the summer found to be in- 
fested with the pine-tree weevil, which cuts off the young shoots, 
generally the leader at the top of the tree. The weevils were de- 
stroyed by cutting off and burning the affected shoots. 

(11) Quality of the Water. 
The examinations of the water supplied to the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict during the past year, made both in the laboratory of the Board 
and by the State Board of Health, indicate an improvement in the 
quality of the water in almost every respect, and the results of these 
examinations show that the water supplied has been better than for 



32 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

many years previous. The number of organisms bas somewhat 
increased, but they have not generally been of an objectionable 
character. Those found in Lake Cochituate did afford a disagree- 
able odor and taste, although not unwholesome, and during the larger 
portion of the year the water from the lake was not supplied to the 
District. The water in the various distributing reservoirs has been 
generally free from the objectionable organisms. 

(12) The Water Supply. 

The rainfall on all the watersheds and the consequent yield of 
water has for the fifth consecutive year been below the average 
recorded for years during which records have been kept. The rain- 
fall on the Sudbury watershed was 36.15 inches, which is 9.55 inches 
below the average for thirty-four years, and the lowest of record ex- 
cept in the year 1883, which was known as the " dry year." The 
rainfall on the Wachusett watershed was 37.83 inches, which is 
10.23 inches below the average of the past twelve years recorded. 
During the last seven months the yield has been especially small. 

The city of Newton and the town of Hyde Park have obtained 
their supply of water from their own sources, which so far have 
proved adequate for their uses, but all the other cities and towns 
constituting the Metropolitan District have been supplied with water, 
and, in addition, under special arrangements, the town of Swamp- 
scott, a small portion of the town of Saugus and the United States 
Government reservation on Peddock's Island. 

The average daily quantity of water furnished, as determined by 
measurement at the pumping stations and by the flow through the 
Weston Aqueduct, including the estimated yield of Spot Pond, was 
127,301,000 gallons, which is an increase in the daily supply. of 
2,230,000 gallons over the preceding year. 

V. WATER WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, disbursements, assets and 
liabilities of the Board for the State fiscal year, beginning with De- 
cember 1, 1907, and ending with November 30, 1908, was, in ac- 
cordance with the requirements of chapter 255 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, presented to the General Court in January last, and a. 
copy of this financial abstract is printed as Appendix No. 5. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 33 

The more detailed statement of its doings required by said chap- 
ter, for the calendar year 1908, in relation to the Metropolitan Water 
Works, is herewith presented. 

The Metropolitan Water Loans authorized for the construction 
and acquisition of works have amounted to $40,898,000. To this 
sum are added the proceeds from the sale of certain property by the 
Board, and these amounted on January 1, 1909, to $162,566.87. 
The total amount, therefore, which the Board has been authorized 
to expend is $41,060,566.87. The amount of expenditures approved 
by the Board for payment out of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund 
was, for the year 1908, $217,129.47, and the total amount so ap- 
proved for payment since the beginning of the work up to January 
1, 1909, has been $40,684,637.51. There was accordingly a balance 
remaining at the beginning of the year 1909 amounting to $375,- 
929.36. 

The Treasurer of the Commonwealth has issued from time to time, 
on the request of the Board, bonds to the amount of $40,500,000. 
These bonds were issued for terms of thirty-nine and one-half and 
forty years from the date of issue, and bear interest at the rate of 
3 per cent, and 3% per cent, per annum. The sinking fund estab- 
lished for the payment of the bonds at maturity amounted on Janu- 
ary 1, 1909, to $6,419,283.28. 

The amount approved by the Board for the maintenance and op- 
eration of the Water Works for the year 1908, which was paid out of 
the annual assessments, was $389,584.54. 

The assessments for the year 1908, for the payment of interest on 
the bonds, for the sinking fund requirements, and for the expenses 
of operation and maintenance of the Water Works, which were 
levied upon the various cities and towns in the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict, amounted to $2,271,151.53. 

The detailed financial statement regarding the Metropolitan Water 
Works is as follows : — 

(1) Metropolitan Water Loans, Receipts and Payments. 

The loans authorized for the construction and acquisition of the 
Metropolitan Water Works, the receipts which are added to the 
proceeds of these loans, the expenditures for the construction and 
acquisition of works, and the balance available on January 1, 1909, 
have been as follows : — 



34 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Loan under chapter 488 of the Acts of 1895, . 

Loan under chapter 453 of the Acts of 1901, . 

Loan under chapter 367 of the Acts of 1906, . 

Loan under chapter 558 of the Acts of 1908, . 

Proceeds from the sales of property applicable to the construc- 
tion and acquisition of works (of which $4,158.76 is for the 



S27,000,000 00 

13,000,000 00 

500,000 00 

398,000 00 

840,898,000 00 



year 1908), 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board for payments to December 31, 1908 (of which $217,- 
129.47 is for the year 1908), 

Balance January 1, 1909, . . . 



162,566 87 
$41,060,566 87 



40,684,637 51 
$375,929 36 



(2) Issues of Metropolitan Water Loan Bonds. 
The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority given 
him to issue from time to time, on the request of the Board, nego- 
tiable bonds to an amount not exceeding $40,898,000, to be desig- 
nated the " Metropolitan Water Loan," has sold bonds as follows : — 



Date of Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Rate of 

Interest 

(Per 


Price 
received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 




Cent.). 










Sept. 25, 1895, 


85.000,000 


34 


110.67 


July 1, 


1935, 


§533,500 00 


Nov. 23, 1896, 






2,000,000 


3* 


106.76268 


Julv 1, 


1935, 


135.253 60 i 


Feb. 8, 1897, 






6,000,000 


3* 


107.82 


July 1, 


1935, 


469,200 00 


Jan. 13, 1898, 






2,000,000 


34 


113.176 


Jan. 1, 


1938, 


263,520 00 


Mar. 2, 1898, 






2,000,000 


34 


112.877 


Jan. 1, 


1938, 


257,540 00 


June 15, 1899. 






3,000,000 


3" 


100.64 


July 1, 


1939, 


19,200 00 


June 28. 1900, 






1,000,000 


3 


102.78* 


July 1, 


1939, 


27,800 00 


Mar. 5, 1901, 






3,000,000 


3 


102.155 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


64,650 00 


July 24, 1901, 






100,000 


3 


100.375 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


375 00 


July 24, 1901, 






150,000 


3 


100.10 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


150 00 


July 30, 1901, 






205,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan., 1, 


1941, 


512 50 


July 31, 1901, 






50,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


125 00 


Aug. 7, 1901, 






50,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


250 00 


Aug. 8, 1901, 






300,000 


3 


100.10 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


300 00 


Aug. 8, 1901, 






200,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


500 00 


Sept. 17, 1901, 






3,100,000 


34 


106.71 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


20S,010 00 


Oct. 1, 1901, 






1,345,000 


3" 


100. 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


— 


Oct. 24, 1901, 






1,500,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 


1941, 


- 


Feb. 26, 1902, 






500,000 


34 


109.13 


Jan. 1, 


1942, 


45,650 00 


Feb. 26, 1902, 






3,000,000 


34 


109.13 


Jan. 1, 


1942, 


273,900 00 


April 7, 1903, 






250,000 


34 


106.725 


Jan. 1, 


1943, 


16,812 50 


April 17, 1903, 






1,250,000 


3* 


106.1329 


Jan. 1, 


1943, 


76,661 25 


Jan. 15, 1904, 






500,000 


34 


104 . 60 


Jan. 1, 


1943, 


23,000 00 


Jan. 15, 1904, 






2,000,000 


3* 


104.60 


Jan. 1, 


1944, 


92,000 00 


Mar. 24, 1905, 






650,000 


3* 


105.761 


Jan. 1, 


1945, 


37,446 50 


June 28, 1906, 






943,000 


3^ 


103.09 


Jan. 1, 


1946, 


29.13S 70 


June 28, 1906, 






100,000 


3* 


103. 09 2 


Jan. 1, 


1946, 


3.090 00 


June 28, 1906, 






307,000 


34 


103.09 2 


Jan. 1, 


1946, 


9.4S6 30 








-540,500,000 


S2,58S,071 35 



1 Including 818,673.60 from readjustment of rate made by the Treasurer in 1897, 

2 Not issued or delivered until 1907. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



35 



Prior to May 1, 1906, all premiums received from the sales of 
bonds were applied to the payment of the current charges in re- 
duction of the annual assessments, but since that date, under the 
provisions of chapter 33 7, Acts of 1906, they have been paid into the 
sinking fund. 

(3) Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Eund. 
The sinking fund established by the Treasurer of the Common- 
wealth has amounted at the end of each year to sums as follows : — 



December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 
December 31 



1895, 
1896, 
1897, 
1898, 
1899, 
1900, 
1901, 
1902, 
1903, 
1904, 
1905, 
1906, 
1907, 
1908, 



$226,286 05 
699,860 70 
954,469 00 
1,416,374 29 
1,349,332 97 
1,573,619 72 
1,662,426 95 
2,256,803 81 
2,877,835 59 
3,519,602 92 
4,207,045 69 
4,897,822 62 
5,643,575 69 
6,419,283 28 



53, were re- 



(4) Annual Assessments and Receipts. 
Assessments for the year, amounting to $2,271,151. 
quired for the payment of the interest on the bonds issued by the 
Commonwealth, the sinking fund requirements, and the expenses of 
operation and maintenance of the Water Works. The requirements 
were: for interest, $1,433,517.91 ; for the sinking fund, $519,581.23; 
and for maintenance and operation, $318,052.39. These assess- 
ments were made by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth upon the 
various municipalities as follows : — 



Arlington, 


. $16,552 50 


Everett, 


. $42,428 56 


Belmont, 


6,832 38 


Hyde Park, . 


1,261 26 


Boston, 


. 1,789,315 84 


Lexington, . 


6,845 05 


Chelsea, 


58,288 06 


Maiden, 


38,049 53 



36 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Medford, 


$36,955 49 


Somerville, 


Melrose, 


28,693 90 


Stoneham, 


Milton, 


14,713 89 


Watertown, 


Nahant, 


4,282 55 


Winthrop, 


Newton, 


6,259 58 




Quincy, 


49,285 01 




Revere, 


21,842 32 





$108,691 08 

9,727 88 

15,639 86 

15,486 79 

2,271,151 53 



The comparatively smaller sums assessed upon the city of Newton 
and the town of Hyde Park were owing to the fact that neither of 
these municipalities had reached the safe capacity of its own sources 
of water supply, and neither had been furnished with water. 

The proceeds from the operations of the Board, exclusive of the 
proceeds from sales of property and of water, are required by statute 
to be applied to the payment of the interest, the sinking fund re- 
quirements and expenses of maintenance and operation of works. 
These for the year 1908 amounted to $6,361.93. 

The amount approved by the Board for the maintenance and opera- 
tion of the Metropolitan Water Works was, for the year 1908, $389,- 
584.54. 



(5) Supplying Water to Cities and Towns outside of Dis- 
trict and to Water Companies. 

Sums have been received during the year 1908, under the pro- 
visions of the Metropolitan Water Act, for water furnished, as fol- 
lows : — 



Town of Framingham, 
Town of Swampscott, 
Town of Revere, 
United States Government, 



$429 39 

4,800 00 

550 00 

1,615 22 

£7,394 61 



The sums so received, prior to March 23, 1907, were annually 
distributed among the cities and towns of the District, but since 
that date, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 238 of the 
Acts of 1907, the sums so received have been paid into the sinking 
fund. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



37 



(6) Expenditures for the Different Works. 

The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



Construction and Acquisition of 
Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 



Administration applicable to all parts of the 
construction and acquisition of the works, 
Wachusett Dam and Reservoir: — 

Wachusett Dam, 

Power plant, .... 

North Dike, .... 

South Dike, .... 

Removal of soil, 

Relocation of railroads, 

Roads and bridges, 

Real estate, .... 

Damages, real estate not taken, business 
and loss of wages, . 

Other expenses, . . 

Improving Wachusett watershed, . 
Wachusett Aqueduct, . 
Sudbury Reservoir, . . 

Protection of Sudbury supply, 
Improving Sudbury watershed, 
Protection of Cochituate supply, 
Improving Cochituate watershed, . 
Improving Lake Cochituate, . 
Pipe lines, Dam No. 3 to Dam No. 1, 
Pipe line, Rosemary siphon, . 
Weston Aqueduct: — 

Aqueduct, .... 

Reservoir, .... 

Supply pipe lines, 

Real estate, taxes and other expenses, 

Distribution system: — 
Low service: — 

New 48-inch main, Section 31, 
Pipe lines and connections, 
Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 
Reservoir, Spot Pond, .... 

Gate house and connections, Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir, ...... 

Real estate and other expenses, 

Amounts carried forward, 



$91,910 04 

1,495 00 

17 45 

301 78 

3,825 00 

240 45 

9,263 31 

9,253 33 

275 00 



$8 10 

163 76 

163 40 

14,283 39 



$64,569 27 
18 92 



3 50 



$5,219 14 



116,581 36 
4,430 54 

688 50 

5 30 

600 00 



14,618 65 



$64,591 69 $142,143 49 



$274,187 56 



52,377,009 24 

118 00 

791,965 68 

137,074 55 

2,536,516 15 

881,847 45 

547,420 78 

3,205,214 04 

527,997 07 

8,547 92 



11,013,710 88 

211,837 07 

1,797,946 85 

2,923,133 71 

129,190 36 

95,489 84 

9,000 00 

8,860 68 

104,137 29 

48,471 48 

23,142 98 



$2,352,192 76 
289,001 82 
584,803 11 
221,926 51 



3,447,924 20 



$64,569 27 

1,752,892 00 

462,572 19 

582,188 73 

65,480 88 
91,725 56 



$3,019,428 63 $20,087,032 90 



38 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Construction and Acquisition of 


For the Year ending 


From Beginning of Work 


Works. 


December 31, 1908. 


to December 31, 1908. 


Amounts brought forward, 


$64,591 69 $142,143 49 


$3,019,428 63 $20,087,032 90 


Distribution system — Concluded. 






Northern high service: — 






Pipe lines and connections, 


34 48 


440,575 26 


Spot Pond pumping station, . 




- 


291,829 35 


Fells Reservoir, Stoneham, 




- 


141,392 94 


Bear Hill Reservoir, Stoneham, 




- 


38,267 70 


Real estate and other expenses, 




- 


14,838 05 


Southern high service: — 








Pipe lines and connections, 




677 75 


515,810 05 


Pumping station, Chestnut Hill, 




152 53 


247,081 49 


Forbes Hill Reservoir, Quincy, 




- 


90,003 49 


Waban Hill Reservoir, Newton, 




- 


61,592 11 


Real estate and other expenses, 




- 


10,226 36 


Northern extra high service, 




10,688 31 


82,717 44 


Southern extra high service, 




- 


22,830 67 


Meters and connections, 




1,532 23 


78,570 56 


Improving Spot Pond Brook, 




- 


3,991 23 


Glenwood pipe yard, . 




- 


33,100 59 


Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 




- 


11,311 26 




77 fi7fi OQ 


C 1*V} CfiT io 




i i,o<o yy 


0,11/0,00* 10 


Diversion of water, South Branch of Nashua 






River, 1 ..... 


52 55 


1,363,684 31 


Acquisition of existing water works: — 






Reimbursement city of Boston, partially con- 






structed Sudbury Reservoir, . 


- 


$1,157,921 59 


To Boston, for works taken January 1, 1898 


- 


12,768,948 80 


To Maiden, Medford and Melrose for taking 






of Spot Pond, .... 


- 


1,240,229 62 


To Newton, for Waban Hill Reservoir, 




60,000 00 


Transfers of works acquired and other prop- 


$15,227,100 01 


erty to accounts for special works, . 




1,240,262 50 




$13,986,837 51 


Engineering, conveyancing, etc., 


$2 25 

O OF 


73,128 47 

1 \ o^o nr^ on 




z zo 


i , ±,uoy,yoo yo 


Pipes, Valves, Castings, etc., sent first to Storage 


$219,875 28 




Yards, and afterwards transferred as needea 






to Different Parts of the Work. 






Sent to storage yards, .... 


$966 85 


$2,093,362 91 


Transferred from storage yards to works, anc 






included in costs above, 


3,712 66 


2,022,975 77 






*u,oo< a 


Deduct excess of transfers over amount 






purchased during year 1908, 


2,745 81 




Total for constructing and acquiring oi 










works, ...... 


$217,129 47 


$40,684,637 51 



1 Of the total expenditures from the beginning of the work, the sum of $150,938 .89 is for Clinton 
sewerage system. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



39 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Administration, 
General supervision, 
Taxes and other expenses, 
Wachusett Reservoir Department: - 

Superintendence, . 

Reservoir, .... 

Forestry, .... 

Protection of supply, 

Buildings and grounds, 

Wachusett dam, . 

Wachusett aqueduct, . " 

Clinton sewerage system: — 
Pumping station, 
Sewers, screens and filter-beds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Swamp drainage, . 



Sudbury Department: — 

Superintendence, Framingham office, 

Ashland Reservoir, 

Hopkinton Reservoir, . 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Framingham Reservoirs, 1, 2 and 3, 

Sudbury Reservoir, 

Lake Cochituate, . 

Marlborough Brook filters, 

Pegan filters, 

Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds, 

Sanitary inspection, 

Cochituate Aqueduct, . 

Sudbury Aqueduct, 

Weston Aqueduct, 



Distribution Department: — 

Superintendence, ..... 

Arlington Pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill low-service pumping station, pumping service, 

Chestnut Hill high-service pumping station, pumping serv: 

Spot Pond pumping station, pumping service, 

West Roxbury pumping station, pumping service, 

Arlington standpipe, 

Bear Hill Reservoir, 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

Fells Reservoir, . . 

Forbes Hill Reservoir, . 

Mystic Lake, conduit and pumping station, 

Mystic Reservoir, 

Waban Hill Reservoir, . 

Weston Reservoir, 



Amounts carried forward, 



$6,061 04 

14,081 46 

7,453 94 
2,560 06 

3,042 23 

6,962 32 

3,251 46 

3,394 64 

6,826 43 

1,642 09 

2,138 05 



$7,604 05 
1,633 79 
2,078 54 
836 43 
5,753 49 
8,720 26 
6,222 49 
2,389 09 
2,628 51 
922 10 
3,005 84 
5,811 35 

12,194 80 
4,684 89 



$4,844 56 

9,238 43 

35,080 60 

52,437 73 

16,117 14 

7,393 20 

364 13 

249 40 

10,468 00 

385 68 

1,045 11 

3,953 98 

1,248 95 

442 32 

2,166 94 



513,247 35 
29,395 92 
35,714 97 



57,413 72 



64,485 63 



$145,436 17 $200,257 59 



40 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Maintenance and Operation. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Amounts brought forward, . 

Distribution Department — Concluded. 
Spot Pond, .... 
Buildings at Spot Pond, 
Pipe lines: — 

Low service, 

Northern high service, 

Southern high service, 

Supply pipe lines, 
Buildings at Chestnut Hill, 
Chestnut Hill pipe yard, 
Glenwood pipe yard and buildings,. 
Stables, 

Waste prevention, 
Venturi meters, 
Measurement of water, . 
Arlington pumping station, buildings and grounds, 



Total for maintaining and operating works, 



$145,436 17 



7,722 59 
145 02 

7,814 43 
2,756 37 
6,223 58 

385 08 
1.775 62 
1,642 86 
3,995 56 
7,377 63 

119 42 
1,240 03 
1,068 36 
1,624 23 



,257 59 



189,326 95 



$389,584 54 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement under Metropolitan 

Water Act. 
The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the require- 
ments of the Metropolitan Water Act, a detailed statement of the 
expenditures and disbursements, receipts, assets and liabilities for 
the year 1908. 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 

The total amount of the expenditures and disbursements on ac- 
count of construction and acquisition of works for the year beginning 
January 1, 1908, and ending December 31, 1908, is $217,129.47, 
and the total amount from the time of the organization of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Board, July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1908, is 
$40,684,637.51. 

For maintenance and operation the expenditures for the year have 
been $389,584.54, and from the beginning of the work, $3,413,880.85. 

The salaries of the commissioners, and other expenses of admin- 
istration, have been apportioned to the construction of the works and 
to the maintenance and operation of the same, and appear under each 
of those headings. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



41 



The following is a division of the expenditures according to their 
general character : — 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition 
by Purchase or Taking. 

A dministration. 
Commissioners, 
Secretary and auditor, . 
Clerks and stenographers, 
Legal services, 
Travelling, . 
Stationery and printing, 
Postage, express and telegrams, 
Furniture and fixtures, . 
Alterations and repairs of buildings, 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of 

building, ..... 

Rent and taxes, main office, . 
Miscellaneous expenses, .... 

Engineering. 
Chief engineer and department engineers, 
Principal assistant engineers, 
Engineering assistants, .... 

Consulting engineers, .... 

Inspectors, ...... 

Architects, ...... 

Railroad and street car travel, 

Wagon hire, ..... 

Stationery and printing, 

Postage, express and telegrams, 

Engineering and drafting instruments and tools 

Engineering and drafting supplies, . 

Books, maps and photographic supplies, 

Furniture and fixtures, .... 

Alterations and repairs of buildings: — 

Main office, ..... 

Sub-offices, ..... 
Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of 
buildings: — 

Main office, .... 

Sub-offices, .... 
Rent and taxes, main office, . 
Rent of sub-offices and other buildings, 
Field offices and sheds, 
Clinton office building, . 
Unclassified supplies, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Amounts carried forward, 



52,333 33 

750 00 

1,735 00 



28 20 



271 53 
83 33 
17 75 



$300 00 

1,609 62 

8,559 72 

825 00 

664 74 

12 35 

269 00 

140 52 

5 35 

30 
36 74 



796 58 

2 80 

250 00 



1 95 



,219 14 



13,474 67 



$18,693 81 



$114,976 91 

49,092 03 

59,184 16 

2,359 00 

3,640 89 

11,223 96 

2,807 17 

4,280 89 

5,784 27 

11,402 37 
4,940 34 
4,495 57 



$207,471 36 

157,213 51 

1,032,025 69 

24,415 07 

290,882 13 

36,161 19 

26,817 26 

45,297 78 

26,136 29 

7,729 18 

19,308 03 

24,962 01 

6,968 46 

14,978 46 

14,107 86 
2,939 36 



24,873 39 
19,625 12 
14,589 45 
4,526 74 
1,274 49 
9,866 87 
8,240 53 
8,926 27 



$274,187 56 



2,029,336 50 



$2,303,524 06 



42 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 


Amounts brought forward, 




$18,693 81 




$2,303,524 06 


Construction. 










Preliminary work (borings, test pits and other 








investigations): — 










% Advertising, ..... 


$36 58 




$6,342 80 




Other preliminary work as given in detail ir 


i . 








preceding annual report, 


. 


36 58 


155,457 41 


161,800 21 








Contracts, Wachusett Reservoir: — 










Contracts completed and final payment 


3 








made prior to January 1, 1908, 


. 




$5,314,738 30 




McBride & Co., Stillwater improvement, 


. 




23,314 67 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, 


. 




3,476 60 




McArthur Bros. Co., in settlement of clain 


1 








under item 26 of Contract 195, 


$88,200 00 




88,200 00 




McArthur Bros. Co., in settlement of claim or 


i 








account of building Sect. 2 of the relocatior 


i 








of Central Massachusetts Railroad, Con 










tract 195a, ..... 


3,800 00 


92,000 00 


3,800 00 


5,433,529 57 








Contracts completed, improving Wachuset 


t 








Watershed: — 










Sterling filter-beds, .... 




- 




11,893 75 


Contracts completed, Wachusett Aqueduct, 




- 




1,447,208 55 


Contracts completed, Sudbury Reservoir, 




- 




1,545,028 33 


Contracts completed, protection Sudbury Sup 










ply: — 










City of Marlborough, main sewer, 




- 




9,000 00 


Contracts completed, improving Lake Cochit 










uate, ...... 




- 




60,657 45 


Contracts completed, protection Cochituatf 










Supply: — 










Town of Framingham, low-level sewer, 




- 




9,000 00 


Contracts completed, Rosemary siphon, . 




- 




5,916 96 


Contracts completed, pipe line, Dam No. 3 tc 


> 








Dam No. 1, . 




- 




17,240 22 


Contracts completed, Clinton sewerage system 




- 




66,878 22 


Contracts, Weston Aqueduct: — 










Contracts completed and final payments 


3 








made prior to January 1, 1908, 


- 




$1,781,564 31 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 2 


- 




201,827 74 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, 


- 




2,911 80 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 3 


- 




126,420 70 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, 


- 




4,214 78 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 6 


- 




108,933 26 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, 


- 




7,013 05 




Shanahan, Casparis & Co., . . Sect. 12 


- 




138,151 78 




Sundry bills paid under this contract, 


- 




3,339 77 


2,374,377 19 






$ 


Amounts carried forward, 


$110,730 39 


13,446,054 51 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



43 



General Character op Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 


From Beginning of Work 




December 31, 1908. 


to December 31, 1908. 


Amounts brought forward, 


. 


$110,730 39 


$13,446,054 51 


Construction — Con. 








Contracts, Distribution System: — 








Contracts completed and final payments 


3 






made prior to January 1, 1908, 


. 




$4,423,966 12 


The Blake & Knowles Steam Pump Works 








for furnishing and erecting pumping engine 








at Arlington pumping station, 


$5,240 00 




5,240 00 


Coffin Valve Co., for water valves for ne"w 


r 






48-inch main, Section 31, 


1,370 20 




1,370 20 


Bruno & Petitti, for laying water pipes foi 


r 






new 48-inch main, Section 31, 


9,239 70 




9.239 70 


Warren Foundry and Machine Co., for fur 








nishing cast-iron pipes and special castings 


3 






for new 48-inch main, Section 31, 


43,296 96 




43,296 96 


Allis-Chalmers Co., pumping engine, 


458 00 


59,604 86 


4,895 00 








Deduct value of pipes, valves, etc., included ir 


L 




$4,488,007 98 


above list, transferred to maintenance 








account December 31, 1900, . 


~ 




3,139 77 

A W i QCP Of 




4,$o4,000 &1 


Additional work: — 








Labor, ...... 


$5,557 45 




$757,744 34 


Professional services, medical services, analy- 








ses, etc., ..... 


50 00 




1,907 99 


Travelling, ..... 


20 




2,744 20 


Rent, ...... 


- 




3,611 73 


Water rates, ..... 


- 




1,454 77 


Freight and express, .... 


75 14 




13,019 65 


Jobbing and repairing, 


18 05 




9,686 13 


Tools, machinery, appliances, and hardware 








supplies, ..... 


3,471 11 




77,413 88 


Electrical supplies, .... 


437 13 




5,361 81 


Castings, ironwork and metals, . 


2,634 08 




82,047 79 


Iron pipe and valves, 


1,082 58 




61,450 27 


Blasting supplies, .... 


1 20 




1,936 88 


Paint and coating, .... 


37 08 




4,353 51 


Fuel, oil and waste, .... 


2 38 




10,515 15 


Lumber and field buildings, 


749 22 




86,037 14 


Drain pipe, ..... 


13 43 




9,163 80 


Brick, cement and stone, . 


111 00 




26,499 79 


Sand, gravel and filling, 


7 10 




6,902 16 


Municipal and corporation work, 


119 53 




209,007 43 


Police service, ..... 


- 




210,801 74 


Sanitary inspection, .... 


7 00 




13,107 09 


Judgments and settlements for damages, 


- 




52,624 26 


Unclassified supplies, 


152 06 




17,257 41 


Miscellaneous expenses, 


24 30 


14,550 04 


5,953 40 






1,670,602 32 


Amounts carried forward, 


$184,885 29 


$19,601,525 04 



44 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 


Amounts brought forward, 




$184,885 29 


$19,601,525 04 


Construction — Con. 








Legal and expert: — 








Legal services, . . . . 


- 




$4,668 82 


Expert services, ..... 


- 




1,862 66 


Court expenses, ..... 


$150 00 




1,317 20 


Miscellaneous expenses, .... 


- 




185 80 






150 00 


<? ft°i ii 






o,Uo-± *±o 


Real Estate. 








Legal and expert: — 








Legal services, ...... 


- 




$4,736 31 


Conveyancer and assistants, 






$731 00 




110,042 97 


Experts, .... 






- 




17,871 58 


Appraisers, 






- 




22,332 75 


Court expenses, 






- 




11,139 43 


Counsel expenses, 






- 




43 25 


Conveyancing supplies, 






16 00 




3,181 53 


Conveyancing expenses, 






27 65 




5,937 54 


Miscellaneous expenses, 






130 34 




4,326 15 


Settlements made by Board, . 






16,685 00 




3,387,872 84 


Judgments, .... 






1,763 39 




170,445 63 


Taxes and tax equivalents, 






- 




68,182 41 


Care and disposal, 






2,125 97 




86,866 06 






21,479 35 


o ono f)7°L IK 






o,oyi,y/o to 


Damages to Real Estate not taken, to Business 








and on Account of Loss of Wages. 








Legal and expert: — 








Legal services, ...... 


- 




$1,130 67 


Expert services, 






- 




2,857 62 


Court expenses, 






$1,236 50 




15,394 34 


Miscellaneous expenses, 






125 00 




125 00 


Settlements, 






483 33 




414,813 65 


Judgments, .... 






8,770 00 




113,183 42 






10,614 83 


=117 'ifil 7fl 






Of/, out l\j 


Claims on Account of Diversion of Water. 








Legal and expert: — 








Legal services, ...... 


- 




$3,774 98 


Expert services, 






- 




19,339 69 


Court expenses, 






- 




20,775 49 


Miscellaneous expenses, 






- 




1,289 58 


Settlements, 






- 




917,350 00 


Judgments, .... 






- 




220,719 67 








1 1QO OIQ 11 






i,ioo,.i-±y a 


Purchase of Existing Water Works. 








Legal and expert: — 








Legal services, ...... 


- 




$1,878 89 


Expert services, ..... 


- 




13,569 82 


Amounts carried forward, 


- 


$217,129 47 


$15,448 71 $25,233,292 08 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



45 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 


Amounts brought forward, 

Purchase of Existing Water Works — Con. 
Legal and expert — Con. 

Court expenses, ..... 

Miscellaneous expenses, .... 
Settlements and judgments, .... 


- $217,129 47 


$15,448 71 $25,233,292 08 

29,728 38 

1,470 94 

15,227,100 01 

ic 070 740 r\A 


Relocation Central Massachusetts Railroad. 
Settlements, ...... 


- 


177,597 39 


Total amount of construction expenditures, 


. $217,129 47 


$40,684,637 51 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Maintenance and Operation of Works. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, ...... 

Secretary and assistants, .... 

Postage, printing, stationery and other supplies, 
Travelling, ....... 

Telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 

Alterations and repairs of building, 

Rent and taxes, office building, 

Miscellaneous expenses, .... 

Supervision and general superintendence: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, ..... 

Postage, printing, stationery, office and laboratory supplies 

Telephone, heating, lighting and care of offices, 

Travelling and incidental expenses, 

Alterations and repairs of buildings, 

Rent and taxes, main office, .... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . .... 



Pumping service: — 
Labor, 

Fuel, .... 
Oil, waste and packing, . 
Repairs and renewals, . 
Small supplies and expenses, 
Rent, West Roxbury pumping station, 



Amount carried forward, 



$4,666 67 

4,286 33 

2,586 26 

559 01 

357 28 

21 22 

689 73 

80 85 



$22,852 80 

1,277 97 

2,146 16 

553 73 

79 25 

2,069 25 

416 76 



164,507 45 

46,077 67 

1,886 15 

4 V 950 07 

2,059 40 

786 36 



$13,247 35 



29,395 92 



120,267 10 



$162,910 37 



46 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Amount brought forward, ..... 

Maintenance and Operation of Works — Con. 
Superintendents and assistant superintendents, 
Engineering assistants, 
Sanitary inspectors, 

Recording and scientific instruments and supplies, 
Labor and teaming, 
Tools, machinery and appliances, 
Lumber and hardware supplies, 
Jobbing and repairing, 
Travelling, .... 
Horses, vehicles and stable expenses, 
Fuel, lighting and telephone, 
Municipal and corporation work, 
Alteration and repairs of building, 
Unclassified supplies, 
Miscellaneous expenses, 
Conveyancer and assistants, 
Taxes and tax equivalents, 
Contracts and agreements, 
Contracts for pipes, valves, etc., bought from construction work since 
January 1, 1908 



Total expenditures for maintenance and operation, 



$6,189 88 
7,964 20 
4,008 00 

442 75 

129,311 15 

1,039 70 

2,680 20 

665 60 
3,444 80 
9,160 23 
5,042 70 

574 15 

460 39 
6,981 96 
5,566 36 

131 64 

35,483 33 

6,880 03 

647 10 



$162,910 37 



226,674 17 



,584 54 



(b) Receipts. 

The total amount of receipts from the operations of the Board 
and from sales of property for the year beginning January 1, 1908, 
and ending December 31, 1908, is $19,395.46; and the total amount 
from the time of the organization of the Metropolitan Water Board, 
July 19, 1895, to December 31, 1908, is $543,832.34. The general 
character of these receipts is as follows : — 



General Character op Receipts. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 


For distribution hack to District: — 
Fees for admission to District, 
Water furnished to cities and towns outside 
of District, ...... 

Water furnished to water companies, . 


- 


$92,265 00 

90,454 77 
37,145 88 








Amount carried forward, 


.... 


$219,865 65 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



47 



General Character op Receipts. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 



Amount brought forward, 

To the credit of the loan fund: — 

Real estate and buildings, .... 
Tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

To the credit of the maintenance fund: — 
Tools, supplies and reimbursements, 

To the credit of the sinking fund: — 

Water furnished to cities and towns outside 

of District and to water companies, 
Forfeiture for contracts awarded but not 

executed, ...... 

Rents, ....... 

Land products, ..... 

Unclassified receipts and interest, . , . 



Total receipts, 



$639 06 
3,519 70 



$1,480 16 



$7,394 61 



1,307 00 
4,805 15 

249 78 



1,158 76 



1,480 16 



13,758 54 



$19,395 46 



$35,000 52 
127,566 35 



$1,480 16 



$14,551 04 

500 00 

91,328 99 

50,407 26 

3,132 37 



$219,865 65 



162,566 87 



1,480 16 



159,919 66 



$543,832 34 



The foregoing receipts have been credited to the various objects 
or works, as follows : — 



Sources op Receipts. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 


Admission into Metropolitan Water Distric 


t 








(Quincy, Nahant, Arlington, Stoneham 










Milton and Lexington), 


. 




$92,265 00 




Supplying water to cities and towns outside o 


f 








Water District (Swampscott, Revere, Lex 










ington, Wakefield, Cambridge, Framingham 










and U. S. Government), and to water com 










panies (Framingham, Milton and Revere), 


$7,394 61 


$7,394 61 


142,151 69 


$234,416 69 








Construction and acquisition of works: — 










Administration, .... 


$59 28 




$169 39 




Wachusett Dam, 




75 00 




6,759 48 




Wachusett Reservoir, 




895 25 




135,009 03 




Wachusett Aqueduct, 




- 




5,204 70 




Weston Aqueduct, 




125 00 




5,137 63 




Sudbury Reservoir and watershed, 




60 00 




7,795 42 




Distribution system, . 




1,777 48 




73,359 33 




Diversion of water, Clinton sewerage system 


- 




1,367 94 




Purchase of existing water works, 


474 55 


3,466 56 


18,044 08 


252,847 00 








Amounts carried forward, 




$10,861 17 


$487,263 69 



48 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Sources of Receipts. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 


Amounts brought forward, 




$10,861 17 




$487,263 69 


Maintenance and operation of works: — 










Administration, ..... 


$102 83 




$102 83 




General supervision, . 








311 97 




311 97 




Wachusett Aqueduct, 








262 85 




4,379 66 




Wachusett Reservoir, 








4,234 52 




23,288 35 




Sudbury system, 








1,790 68 




13,603 65 




Distribution system, . 








1,383 94 




10,504 41 




Clinton sewerage system, . 








447 50 




4,377 78 








8,534 29 




55,568 65 
















$19,395 46 


$543,832 34 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Water Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; police supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; 
machinery, tools and other appliances and supplies; real estate connected 
with works not completed; completed works, including real estate and 
buildings connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 
There are liabilities as follows : — 

Due on monthly pay rolls, .... 



,383 90 



The amount has been agreed upon in the following case, but the 
deed has not yet passed: town of West Boylston, $800. 

On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the amounts 
due for land damages, water rights and claims for damages to estab- 
lished business, as no sums have been agreed upon and suits are 
now pending in court for the determination of most of them : — 

Patrick Bradley, Thomas H. Burgess, Lucy A. Wood, Elwin I. 
Chace, Henry F. Keyes, James E. Welch, Bridget M. Joyce, Byron 
D. Allen, J. Frank Wood et al., Asa Knight, Mary J. Fyfe, estate 
of William E. Fyfe, George M. Plummer, Edward F. Merriam, 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 49 

estate of Charles H. Hastings, George R. Hastings, William ' H. 
Hastings, Everett and Oliver S. Kendall, Sanford C. Kendall, es- 
tate of William H. Yickery, James H. and Hannah S. Wood. Ase- 
nath M. Bartlett, estate of Charles I. Longley, estate of Daniel M. 
Marsh, Erancis W. M. Good ale, George W. Shattuck, Nellie M. 
Kirby, Willis A. Fuller, Boston & Albany Railroad Company. 



VI. METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE WORKS. 

The North Metropolitan System provides for an area situated 
in the Mystic River valley and for the larger part of the Charles 
River valley which lies north of the Charles River, and embraces 
the cities of Cambridge, Chelsea, Everett, Maiden, Medford, Mel- 
rose, Somerville and Woburn and parts of the city of Boston, and 
the towns of Arlington, Belmont, Revere, Stoneham, Wakefield, 
Winchester and Winthrop and part of the town of Lexington, — 9 
cities and 8 towns. The district has an area of 90.50 square miles. 
It has an estimated population, as of December 31, 1908, based upon 
the census of 1905, of 499,940; and it is estimated that of . this 
number 424,050, or 84.8 per cent., contribute sewage to the North 
Metropolitan System. 

The South Metropolitan System provides for the areas situated 
in that part of the Charles River valley lying south of the Charles 
River, a small portion of the valley north of the Charles River, and 
also a portion of the Neponset River valley ; and embraces the 
cities of Newton, Quincy and Waltham, portions of the city of 
Boston, and the towns of Brookline, Hyde Park, Milton, W^ater- 
town and part of the town of Dedham, — 4 cities and 5 towns. 
This district has an area of 100.87 square miles. It has an esti- 
mated population, as of December 31, 1908, of 340,490, of which 
number it is estimated that 201,595, or 59.2 per cent., contribute 
sewage to the South Metropolitan System. 

(1) North Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

Extension of Deer Island and East Boston Pumping Stations. 

Owing to the necessity of providing additional sewerage pumping 
facilities for the North Metropolitan System, the Legislature of the 
year 1908, upon the recommendation of the Board, authorized the 



50 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

enlargement of the Deer Island and East Boston pumping stations 
and the installation and equipment of additional plants in these 
stations. A sum not exceeding $195,000 was appropriated for the 
Deer Island station, and a sum not exceeding $250,000 for the East 
Boston station, these sums to be expended in the three years begin- 
ning with 1908. 

(a) Deer Island Pumping Station Extension. 

The Board proceeded at once in the enlargement of the Deer 
Island station. The foundations for the enlargement have been 
built by day labor, under the direction of the Chief Engineer of 
the Sewerage Works, and plans have been made for the superstruc- 
tures which are to be built for the engine and coal houses. The 
engine house extension will be 50 feet long and 46 feet wide, and 
that of the coal house will be 103 feet long and 35 feet wide, both 
buildings to be constructed in harmony with the architectural lines 
of the present station. The granite wall of the highway in front 
of the station has been extended so as further to protect the road 
■j> against the action of the tides. A contract has been made with the 
Allis-Chalmers Company of Milwaukee, Wisconsin, for furnishing 
at this station a pumping engine, with boilers and other appurte- 
nances, of the capacity of 100,000,000 gallons, to be of a type 
similar to that of the engines already installed at the station. It 
is expected that the construction of the engine will require a period 
of about two years. 

(b) East Boston Pumping Station Extension. 
The great fire which destroyed a large portion of the city of 
Chelsea on April 12, 1908, extended across the Chelsea Creek, and 
the flames set fire to the East Boston pumping station, which is lo- 
cated on the East Boston side of the creek. The roof, windows and 
doors of the station and the coal house and wharf were destroyed, 
and most of the iron and steel girders and piping were twisted and 
made useless, and the engines and boilers were largely impaired and 
entirely put out of commission. Immediate action was necessarily 
taken to provide for the sewage which was forced through the sta- 
tion by the pumping engines, and the greatest possible expedition 
was necessary in order that the interruption of sewage disposal should 
not injuriously affect the health of portions of the District. By 




-- . 





EAST BOSTON PUMPING STATION after Fire of April 12, tqos 

Outside and Inside 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 51 

the adjustment of gates and valves the undiluted sewage from the 
separate systems connected with the works and some sewage from the 
other more offensive connections were temporarily provided for and 
arrangements were made by which necessary overflows should be 
as little troublesome as possible. 

By carrying on the work with all possible expedition both night 
and day, one of the engines was started in just two weeks after the 
date of the fire, so that thereafter the service became normal. The 
second engine was started one week later, and the third engine was 
ready for service on June 3. It is believed that very little dis- 
turbance was experienced in any part of the Sewerage System, and 
great credit is due to the Chief Engineer and his assistants for their 
prompt and efficient work. 

A temporary wooden roof and temporary windows and doors have 
been placed in the station and the whole put into proper working 
order. A special appropriation of $40,000 for the restoration of 
the station and its equipment was authorized by the Legislature, 
and the larger part of the sum was expended during the year, but 
leaving some of the work to be done after permanent plans have 
been adopted. 

The occurrence of the fire, however, induced the Board to defer 
for a time the construction of the enlargement of this station and 
to enter into a careful investigation as to the future requirements 
of the North Metropolitan System. This investigation has been 
made by Messrs. Mills and Stearns, consulting engineers of the 
Board, in connection with the Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works, 
Mr. Brown. It is probable that the work of enlargement of this 
station will be entered upon in the early spring. 

(c) Stable and Locker Buildings. 
The fire at Chelsea also caused the destruction of the group of 
small buildings used for stable, locker and general purposes for 
the North System, which were situated on the East Boston side of 
Chelsea Creek on Chelsea Street, opposite the station lands. The 
Board had called the attention of the Legislature to the necessity of 
erecting permanent buildings in place of the temporary structures 
upon the lot. After the fire, however, it was believed that it was 
desirable to make other arrangements, and, a favorable opportunity 
occurring, it was determined advisable to sell this lot with the im- 



52 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

provements which had been made. This sale was accordingly made 
and the sum of $17,500 was received. Under the special act of last 
year, which was passed after the fire, the Board was authorized to 
use any money received from the sale for the purchase of land and 
the erection of stable and locker buildings thereon. In the mean- 
time, temporary arrangements have been made, and the selection of 
a site and the construction of new buildings have been deferred until 
a final determination is reached in regard to the enlargement of the 
East Boston pumping station. 

(2) South Metropolitan Sewerage System — Construction. 

The extension of the High-level Sewer from the corner of Center 
and Perkins streets in Jamaica Plain through West Roxbury, Brook- 
line and to Oak Square in Brighton, was authorized in the year 
1906, and the work of construction has since been in progress. The 
entire length of the line of the extension is 5.64 miles, the sewer 
varying in size from 7 feet to 5 feet in diameter. The work was 
divided into seven sections, involving the making of thirteen con- 
tracts. Portions of two sections, however, were, for reasons given 
in the preceding report, constructed by day labor under the direct 
supervision of the Chief Engineer of the Sewerage Works. 

All but 145 feet of the whole length has been completed and the 
work will be finished early in the current year. There are two un- 
completed contracts. The most difficult part of the construction 
was in the vicinity of Jamaica Pond, which involved the building 
of a tunnel 2,919 feet in length under pneumatic processes. It was 
especially necessary to adopt means by which there should be no 
disturbance of the waters of the pond. This work was accordingly 
performed by day labor, and the Chief Engineer had the immediate 
assistance of a tried expert in this class of construction. The tunnel 
has been successfully completed at an expense considerably below 
the estimate. The entire extension has involved a large amount of 
rock excavation, and considerable difficulties have been encountered 
in other places in order to create as little disturbance as possible in 
residential districts. 

The sum of $559,166.41 was expended on this work during the 
year, making a total since the beginning of $1,037,919.10. There 
is no doubt that the extension will be completed within the amount 
originally estimated and for which loans were authorized. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



53 



(3) Acquisition of Lands and Settlements for Lands 

acquired. 
There lias been but a single taking during the year of land or 
easements for the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, and this was for 
the purpose of the extension of the High-level Sewer, as follows : — 





List of Takings for Metropolitan Sewerage Works for the Year 1908. 


No. 


Location and Description. 


Former Owner. 


Recorded. 


Purpose of Taking. 


21 


Brighton, — in Washington Street, be- 
tween Lake Street and Oak Square. 
Area, easements in 4.88 acres. 


Public street. 


1908. 

May 11. 


Section 86, South Met- 
ropolitan System. 



During the year 1908 settlements on account of the takings made 
in the North Metropolitan District have been effected in 2 cases, 
involving a payment of $460 ; and also in 2 cases in the South 
Metropolitan District settlements have been effected, under which 
payments have been made amounting to $2,170. 

Of the 4 sewerage settlements, 2 were on account of the sewer 
extensions to Maiden and to Belmont, 1 on account of the extension 
of the High-level Sewer in Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, and 1 on 
account of an early taking for the High-level Sewer in Quincy. 



Summary of Land Settlements for the Year 1908. 



Location. 


Area in Acres. 


Number of 
Settlements. 


Payments. 


North Metropolitan District. 
Maiden, 

Cambridge, ...... 

South Metropolitan District. 
Quincy, . 

Boston, ...... 


.018 
.058 

.712 
.231 


1 
1 

1 

1 


$250 00 
210 00 

120 00 
2,050 00 


Aggregate, 


1.019 


4 


$2,630 00 



54 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(4) North Metropolitan System — Maintenance. 

The main sewers now maintained in the North Metropolitan 
System are 58.57 miles in length and with them are connected 
639.50 miles of local sewers. The number of connections, public 
and special, with the North Metropolitan System is 672. 

The East Boston and Charlestown districts of Boston and the 
cities of Everett, Cambridge, Somerville and Chelsea still maintain 
both separate and combined sewers, but all of the other municipali- 
ties in the North Metropolitan System maintain separate sewers, 
admitting sewage, but not directly admitting any rain water. 

There have been pumped at the Alewife Brook pumping station 
3,627,000 gallons of sewage per day, with an average lift of 12.87 
feet, at a cost of $0,466 per million gallons per foot lifted; at the 
Charlestown station 31,300,000 gallons per day, 8.15 feet lift, at a 
cost of $0,179 per million gallons per foot lifted ; at the East Boston 
station 57,800,000 gallons per day, 15.83 feet lift, at a cost of 
$0,094 per million gallons per foot lifted; and at the Deer Island 
station 59,800,000 gallons per day, 10.50 feet lift, at a cost of 
$0,106 per million gallons per foot lifted. 

The total amount of coal, all of which is bituminous, which was 
purchased for use at the various stations, was 6,497.789 gross tons. 
The contract price per gross ton varied from $3.69 to $4.98. 

During the year 9 public and 25 special connections from local 
sewers have been made with the system, and 14.76 miles of local 
sewers have been added to those already connected with its works. 

The average amount of sewage discharged daily from the outfall 
off Deer Island was 59,800,000 gallons. The maximum daily rate 
of discharge for the year was reached on February 27, when it was 
for a short period about 138,500,000 gallons. The amount of sew- 
age in the District averaged 141 gallons per day for each person, 
taking the estimated population of the district contributing sewage. 
The fact that a portion of the sewers in the District are combined 
sewers, directly admitting in part rain water, considerably increases 
the per capita amount. 

There has been a decrease in the amount of sewage pumped at all 
of the stations. This decrease ite largely due to the small rainfall, 
which was much below the normal amount. Some of the decrease 
was caused by the interruption in the sewage disposal on account of 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 55 

the East Boston fire. There was consequently an increase in the 
cost per million gallons raised one foot. 

The regular cost of maintenance of the North Metropolitan Sys- 
tem during the past year was $141,465.29, which is but slightly in 
excess of the cost of maintenance during the preceding year. To 
this amount, however, is to be added the sum of $22,050.31, which 
was expended for the restoration of the East Boston pumping sta- 
tion under the special appropriation and charged to maintenance. 

(5) South Metropolitan" System — Maintenance. 

In the South Metropolitan System the number of miles of main 
sewers maintained is 42. 78, with which are connected 492.86 miles 
of local sewers, having 117 connections with the Metropolitan Sys- 
tem. 

The Back Bay, Roxbury, West Roxbury, Brighton and Dorches- 
ter districts of Boston and the towns of Brookline and Milton still 
maintain both separate and combined sewers, but all the other dis- 
tricts contributory to this system maintain separate sewers. 

There has been pumped at the Ward Street station an average of 
22,300,000 gallons of sewage per day, with an average lift of 40.73 
feet, at a cost of $0,083 per million gallons per foot lifted; and at the 
Quincy station 3,687,000 gallons, 21.04 feet lift, at an average cost 
of $0,242 per million gallons per foot lifted. 

The total amount of coal, all of which is bituminous, which was 
purchased for use at the various stations, was 2,727.303 gross tons. 
The contract price per gross ton varied from $4.20 to $5.25, the 
prices in this District exceeding those in the North District on ac- 
count of the greater cost of transportation. 

An average of 37,800,000 gallons of sewage has been discharged 
daily from the outfalls into the outer harbor. The maximum rate 
of discharge per day, which was 107,000,000 gallons, was reached 
for a period of about three hours on January 8. 

The average discharge of sewage in the South Metropolitan Sys- 
tem was at the rate of 187 gallons per day per person of the esti- 
mated number contributing sewage in the district. This larger per 
capita discharge is in part because the greater size of the High-level 
Sewer permits the admission of some storm water at periods of 
heavy rainfall. 

All the sewage of the South Metropolitan System is now disposed 



56 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of through the outfall pipes off Nut Island, with the exception of 
that from a small area in the districts of Dorchester and Milton, 
which is so low that its sewage cannot be carried into the High-level 
Sewer except by pumping. The sewage of this area consequently 
is disposed of by the city of Boston through its main Drainage 
Works, and for this service a rental is paid to the city. 

The expenditures for maintenance of the South Metropolitan Sys- 
tem for the past year were $97,945.60, a slight increase over the total 
required for last year. 



VII. SEWERAGE WORKS — FINANCIAL STATEMENT. 

The financial abstract of the receipts, expenditures, disburse- 
ments, assets and liabilities of the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board for the fiscal year of the Commonwealth ending with the 
thirtieth day of November, 1908, was, as stated in connection with 
the Water Works, presented to the General Court in January, in 
accordance with the requirements of chapter 235 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, and a copy of this financial abstract is in part printed 
as Appendix No. 5. 

The following statement of its financial doings, in relation to 
the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, for the calendar year 1908, is 
herewith presented, in accordance with the provisions of the Act of 
1906, as a part of the annual report of the Board. 

The Metropolitan sewerage loans authorized for the construction 
of the Sewerage Works of the North Metropolitan System have 
amounted to $6,573,865.73, to which are added receipts from vari- 
ous sources amounting to $35,883.21. The amount of expenditures 
approved by the Board for payment for the year 1908 was $25,- 
141.96 and the total amount of expenditures approved to January 
1, 1909, was $6,171,165.12. The balance remaining on January 1, 
1909, was $438,583.82. 

The loans authorized for the construction of the various parts of 
the South Metropolitan System have amounted to $8,867,046.27. 
The receipts applicable to the loan fund have been $11,406.82. 
The amount of expenditures approved for payment in the year 1908 
was $559,288.41. The total amount of expenditures approved for 
payment from the beginning of the works has been $8,741,869.20. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 57 

The balance remaining for the South Metropolitan System on Jan- 
nary 1, 1909, was $136,583.89. 

The bonds issued on account of the loans have been for varying 
periods, not exceeding forty years, and bear interest at the rate of 
3 per cent, and 3% per cent. The premiums received on account 
of the sale of bonds on the North Metropolitan System have amounted 
to $175,518.65, and those received on account of the South Metro- 
politan System have amounted to $410,132.03. 

The amount expended for maintenance of the North Metropolitan 
System in the year 1908 was $163,515.60 and for the South Metro- 
politan System $97,945.69, a total for both systems of $261,461.29. 

The assessments made to meet interest, sinking fund require- 
ments and maintenance and operation of the North Metropolitan 
System amounted in the year 1908 to $426,267.84 and the assess- 
ments for the South Metropolitan System amounted to $450,741.38. 

The following is a detailed financial statement regarding the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Works : — 

(1) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans, Receipts and Payments. 
The loans authorized for the construction of the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Works, the receipts which are added to the proceeds of 
these loans, and the expenditures for construction, have been as 
follows : — 

(a) North Metropolitan System. 

Loans under various acts of the Legislature (given in detail in 

report for the year 1901), . . . . . .$5,605,865 73 

Loans under chapters 242, 336 and 399, Acts of 1903, . . 500,000 00 

Loan under chapter 319, Acts of 1906, . . . . . 55,000 00 

Loan under chapter 556, Acts of 1908, . . ' . . . 413,000 00 

$6,573,865 73 
Proceeds from sales of property and from other sources to De- 
cember 31, 1908 (of which $18,729.81 is for the year 1908), . 35,883 21 

$6,609,748 94 
Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and 

the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment to 

December 31, 1908 (of which $25,141.96 is for the year 1908), 6,171,165 12 



Balance, North Metropolitan System, January 1, 1909, . $438,583 82 



58 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

(&) South Metropolitan System. 

Loans under the acts of the years 1889 and 1900 (Charles River 

Valley Sewer), $800,046 27 

Loans under various acts of the Legislature (given in detail in 

report for the year 1901, Neponset River Valley Sewer), . 900,000 00 
Loan under chapter 315 of the Acts of 1903 (Neponset River 

Valley Sewer), 4,000 00 

Loan under chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, .... 4,600,000^00 

Loan under chapter 356 of the Acts of 1903, .... 996,000 00 

Loans under chapters 230 and 246 of the Acts of 1904, . . 392,000 00 

Loan under chapter 406 of the Acts of 1906, . . . 1,175,000 00 
Proceeds from sales of property and other sources to December 

31, 1908 (of which $1,300.22 is for the year 1908), . . . 11,406 82 



^,878,453 09 



Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and 
the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board for payment to 
December 31, 1908 (of which $559,288.41 is for the year 1908), 8,741,869 20 



Balance, South Metropolitan System, January 1, 1909, . . $136,583 89 

(2) Issues of Metropolitan Sewerage Loan - Bonds. 
The Treasurer of the Commonwealth, under the authority of the 
successive statutes, has from time to time issued bonds designated 
" Metropolitan Sewerage Loan," as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



59 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, North System. 
Bonds issued. 





Date op Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Rate of 
Interest 

(Per 
Cent.). 


Price 
received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 


Apr. 2, 


1890, . 


$500,000 


3 


102.40 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


$12,000 00 


Apr. 2, 


1890, . 








500,000 


3 


103.02 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


15,100 00 


Apr. 2, 


1890, . 








500,000 


3 


103 . 62 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


18,100 00 


Apr. 2, 


1890, . 








500,000 


3 


102.327 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


11,635 00 


Apr., 


1890, . 








200,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


6,000 00 


Feb., 


1891, . 








50,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


1 


Mar., 


1891, . 








300,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


\ 35,130 30 1 


Mar., 


1891, . 








18,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


J 


Jan., 


1892, . 








35,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


- 


Feb., 


1892, . 








29,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


- 


Mar., 


1892, . 








50,000 


3 


101. 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


500 00 


June, 


1892, . 








436,000 


3 


101.50 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


1 


July, 


1892, . 








150,000 


3 


101.50 


Jan. 1, 


1930, 


V 11,060 00 1 


Aug., 


1892, . 








150,000 


3 


101.50 


Jan. 1 


1930. 


\ 


Nov., 


1892, . 








3,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


15 00 


Nov., 


1892, . 








200,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Jan., 


1893, . 








35,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


175 00 


Jan., 


1893, . 








25,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


125 00 


Feb., 


1893, . 








20,000 


3 


101. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


200 00 


Feb., 


1893, . 








5,000 


3 


100.50 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


25 00 


Feb., 


1893, . 








400,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


1,000 00 


Mar., 


1893, . 








94,000 


3 


100.25 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


235 00 


May 1 


1894, . 








464,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Oct., 


1894, . 








4,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Oct., 


1894, . 








1,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Nov., 


1894, . 








15,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Nov., 


1894, . 








10,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Dec, 


1894, . 








6,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Apr., 


1895, . 








300,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


Dec, 


1896, . 








30,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


- 


June, 


1897, . 








70,000 


3* 


106.243 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


1 5,084 80 i 


June, 


1897, . 








10,000 


34 


106.243 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


Apr., 


1898, . 








5,000 


3 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


1 


June, 


1898, . 








155,000 


3* 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


> 22,843 75 1 


June, 


1898, . 








60,000 


34 


100. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


1 


Apr., 


1900, . 








265,000 


3 


103.948 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


10,462 20 


May, 


1903, . 








200,000 


34 


104.9797 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


9,959 40 


May, 


1903, . 








50,000 


34 


106.2424 


Jan. 1 


1943, 


3,121 20 


July, 


1903, . 








250,000 


34 


104.419 


July 1 


1943, 


11,047 50 


June, 


1906, . 








55,000 


34 


103.09 


July 1 


, 1943, 


1,699 50 












$6,150,000 


$175,518 65 



1 Readjustment of Treasurer. 



60 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Metropolitan Sewer Loans, South System. 
Bonds issued. 



Date of Sale. 


Amount 

of Bonds 

sold. 


Rate of 

Interest 

(Per 

Cent.). 


Price 
received. 


Date due. 


Premium. 


Apr., 


1890, . 


$100,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


$3,000 00 


Apr., 


1890, 










400,000 


3 


103. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


12,000 00 


May, 


1890, 










300,000 


3 


104. 


Jan. 1 


1930, 


12,000 00 


Aug., 


1895, 










300,000 


3 


100.585 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


1,755 00 


Feb., 


1896, 










50,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


- 


Dec, 


1896, 










135,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


- 


Dec, 


1896, 










15,000 


3 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


- 


June, 


1897, 










300,000 


34 


106.98 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


20,940 00 


June, 


1898, 










35,000 


3i 


100. 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


4,088 00 i 


June, 


1899, 










25,000 


3 


100.64 


Mar. 1 


1936, 


160 00 


June, 


1899, 










1,000,000 


3 


100 . 64 


July 1 


1939, 


6,400 00 


Sept. 


1900, 










10,000 


3 


100 . 79 


July 1 


1939, 


79 00 


Sept. 


1900, 










912 


3 


100. 


July 1 


1939, 


- 


Apr., 


1901, 










40,000 


3 


100.915 


Mar. 1 


1936, 


366 00 


Sept. 


, 1901, 










2,000,000 


34 


106.71 


July 1 


1940, 


134,200 00 


Sept. 


1902, 










14,000 


3 


100. 


July 1 


1939, 


- 


Sept. 


1902, 










500,000 


3* 


107.243 


July 1 


1940, 


36,215 00 


Sept. 


1902, 










150,000 


34 


107.2395 


July 1 


1940, 


10,859 25 


Dec, 


1902, 










200,000 


34 


107.79 


July 1 


1940, 


15,580 00 


Feb., 


1903, 










100,000 


34 


108 . 25 


July 1 


1940, 


8,230 56 1 


Apr., 


1903, 










100,000 


3* 


106.75 


July 1 


1940, 


6,750 00 


Apr., 


1903, 










175,000 


34 


106.75 


July 1 


1940, 


11,812 50 


Apr., 


1903, 










203,000 


34 


106.75 


July 1 


1940, 


13,702 50 


Apr., 


1903, . 










25,000 


34 


106.494 


July 1 


1940, 


1,623 50 


Apr., 


1903, 










133,000 


34 


105 . 9364 


July 1 


1940, 


7,895 42 


May, 


1903, . 










996,000 


34 


106 . 2424 


Jan. 1 


1943, 


62,174 31 


May, 


1903, . 










4,000 


34 


105.5453 


Mar. 1 


1935, 


221 81 


July, 


1904, . 










392,000 


34 


104.929 


July 1 


1944, 


19,321 68 


June, 


1906, . 










154,000 


34 


103.09 


Jan. 1 


1946, 


4,758 60 


June, 


1906, . 










21,000 


34 


103.09 2 


Jan. 1 


1946, 


648 90 


Apr., 


1907, . 










300,000 


34 


101.85 


Jan. 1 


1947, 


5,550 00 


Apr., 


1908, . 










700,000 


34 


101.40 


Jan. 1 


1946, 


9,800 00 














$8,877,912 


$410,132 03 



Readjustment of Treasurer. 



2 Not issued, or delivered until 1907. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



61 



(3) Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking- Fund. 

Under authority of chapter 122 of the Acts of 1899, and section 
14 of chapter 424 of the Acts of 1899, the Treasurer of the Com- 
monwealth was required to consolidate the sinking funds of all the 
Metropolitan sewerage loans into one fund, to be known as the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund. 

The Board received, during the year, from rentals and from other 
sources, to be applied to the sinking fund, $172.41. 

The sinking fund established has amounted at the end of each 
year to sums as follows : — 



December 31, 1899 
December 31, 1900 
December 31, 1901 
December 31, 1902 
December 31, 1903 



$361,416 59 
454,520 57 
545,668 26 
636,084 04 
754,690 41 



December 31, 1904, 
December 31, 1905, 
December 31, 1906, 
December 31, 1907, 
December 31, 1908, 



$878,557 12 
1,008,724 95 
1,146,998 68 
1,306,850 30 
1,492,418 98 



(4) Annual Appropriations, Receipts and Expenditures. 

The annual appropriations for the maintenance of the Metropoli- 
tan Sewerage Works, the receipts of the Board which are added to 
the appropriations for maintenance, and the expenditures for main- 
tenance for the year ending December 31, 1908, have been as 
follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 

Appropriations under chapters 211 and 582 of the Acts of 1908, 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 



$186,000 00 
618 92 



Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 

Balance January 1, 1909, .... 

South Metropolitan System. 
Appropriation under chapter 213 of the Acts of 1908, 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, 

Amount approved by the Board for payment, . 

Balance January 1, 1909, .... 



$186,618 92 
163,515 60 

$23,103 32 1 



$105,000 00 
151 53 

$105,151 53 
97,945 69 

$7,205 84 



1 Of this balance, $17,284.43 is the remaining portion of the special appropriation of $40,000 
made by chapter 582 of the Acts of 1908 for the restoration and equipment of the East Boston 
pumping station, on account of the Chelsea fire of April 12, 1908. 



62 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(5) Annual Assessments. 
Assessments for the year, amounting to $42 6,2 6 7. 84 for the North 
Metropolitan System and to $450,741.38 for the South Metropolitan 
System, were required for the payment of interest and sinking fund 
requirements and the cost of maintenance and operation of works. 
The requirements for the North Metropolitan System were: for 
interest, $191,340.19; for the sinking fund, $54,569.65; and for 
maintenance, $180,358. For the South Metropolitan System the 
requirements were: for interest, $294,682.42; for the sinking fund, 
$54,712.28; and for maintenance, $101,346.68. The assessments for 
the North Metropolitan System were made upon the cities and towns 
in the District in accordance with chapter 369 of the Acts of the 
year 1906, and the assessments for the South Metropolitan System 
were made in accordance with ratios fixed by the Apportionment 
Commissioners appointed under the provisions of chapter 424 of 
the Acts of the year 1899. The respective assessments were as 
follows : — 

North Metropolitan Sewerage System. 



Arlington, 






$9,507 36 


Somerville, . 


$59,602 25 


Belmont, 






5,200 39 


Stoneham, . 


5,343 13 


Boston, 






75,261 26 


Wakefield, . 


8,659 83 


Cambridge, 






99,768 95 


Winchester, . 


9,285 97 


Chelsea, 






28,155 30 


Winthrop, 


7,605 53 


Everett, 






23,092 42 


Woburn, 


11,943 75 


Lexington, 






3,638 02 


Revere, 


11,596 12 


Maiden, 






33,189 92 








Medford, 






20,019 71 


Total, . 


$426,267 84 


Melrose, 






14,397 93 






South Metropolitan Sewerage System. 




Boston, . . $186,834 48 


Quincy, 


. $27,109 15 


Brookline, 






83,757 57 


Waltham, 


26,527 72 


Dedham, 






11,069 82 


Watertown, . 


13,384 05 


Hyde Park, 






14,433 24 








Milton, 






21,451 65 


Total, . 


$450,741 38 


Newton, 






66,173 70 







(6) Expenditures foe the Different Works. 
The following is a summary of the expenditures made in the 
various operations for the different works : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



63 



Construction and Acquisition op 
Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31,1908. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 



North Metropolitan System. 
Original system, main line and branches, 
Lexington branch, 
Everett branch, 
Wakefield branch, 
Stoneham branch, 
Revere extension,. 
Chelsea and Everett outlets, 
Wakefield branch extension, 
Belmont extension, 
Maiden extension: — 

Administration, 

Section 64, 

Land takings, purchase and recording, 



Bulkhead, Chelsea Creek, 
Stable and locker, East Boston, 
North System, enlargement: — 

Administration, .... 

Deer Island pumping station, extensions and 

additions, ..... 
East Boston pumping station, extensions and 
additions, ..... 



Total North Metropolitan System, 

South Metropolitan System. 
Charles River valley sewer, main line, 
Neponset River valley sewer: — 

Main line, .... 

Brookline branch. 

High-level Sewer: — 

Administration, .... 

Apportionment commission, 

Land takings, purchase and recording, 

Quincy force main, 

Quincy pumping station, 

Section 43, Quincy, . 

Section 44, Quincy, . 

Section 45, Quincy, . 

Section 46, Quincy, . 

Section 47, Quincy, . 

Section 48, Quincy, . 

Sections 48 and 49, embankments, Quincy, 

Section 49, Quincy, . 

Section 50, Quincy, . 

Section 51, Quincy, . 

Section 52, Quincy, . 

Amounts carried forward, 



$25 00 



210 00 



$218 75 
250 85 



$661 66 

22,462 34 

1,313 36 



469 60 



24,437 36 



$25,141 96 



$122 00 



$122 00 



$5,383,957 67 
68,585 15 
54,877 12 
35,698 29 
11,574 10 

215,722 79 
71,216 41 

190,081 97 
57,363 06 



$3,610 46 

46,048 69 

4,689 90 



$661 66 

22,462 34 

1,313 36 



$866,595 66 
44,935 80 



$51,621 43 

2,000 00 

355,623 45 

18,351 71 

11,705 68 

411,749 22 

299,543 47 

76,139 36 

62,551 26 

109,786 58 

295,319 29 

81,548 64 

169,020 18 

109,570 35 

87,203 68 

155,800 65 



54,349 05 

3,231 00 

71 15 



24,437 36 



3,171,165 12 



$800,046 27 



911,531 46 



,297,534 95 $1,711,577 73 



64 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Construction and Acquisition of 
Works. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



From Beginning of Work 
to December 31, 1908. 



Amounts brought forward, 


$122 00 


$2,297,534 95 $1,711,577 73 


South Metropolitan System — Con. 






High-level Sewer — Con. 






Section 53, Quincy, ..... 


- 


98,042 42 


Section 54, Quincy, ..... 


- 


101,918 39 


Section 55, Milton and Quincy, . 


- 


305,816 90 


Section 56, Milton, ..... 


- 


105,736 94 


Section 57, Milton, ..... 


- 


68,783 24 


Section 58, Milton, ..... 


- 


94,089 72 


Section 59, Milton, ..... 


- 


104,444 62 


Section 60, Milton, ..... 


- 


60,796 13 


Section 61, Milton, . . 


- 


129,598 76 


Section 62, Milton 


- 


129,612 28 


Section 63, Milton, ..... 


- 


127,142 45 


Section 64, Xeponset River crossing, . 


- 


47,554 40 


Section 65, Hyde Park, .... 


- 


41,333 37 


Section 66, Hyde Park, .... 


- 


253,902 72 


Section 67, Hyde Park, Stony Brook crossing, 


- 


32,298 33 


Section 68, Hyde Park and Roxbury, . 


- 


78,493 62 


Section 69, West Roxbury, 


- 


102,143 68 


Section 70, West Roxbury, 


- 


131,375 55 


Section 71, West Roxbury, 


- 


91,888 22 


Section 72, West Roxbury, 


- 


127,956 76 


Section 73, West Roxbury, 


- 


494,290 42 


Section 74, West Roxbury and Roxbury, 


- 


147,296 69 


Section 75, Roxbury,. .... 


- 


137,192 99 


Section 76, Roxbury, cast-iron force main, . 


- 


80,342 26 


Section 77, Roxbury, Ward Street pumping 






station, ....... 


- 


560,288 31 


Section 78, Roxbury, connecting sewer, 


- 


35,994 69 


Reversion of grade, Huntington Avenue, 


- 


6,503 56 




ion (V) 


- nnr, o-o if 




1ZZ wu 


O,l70—,0 1 & Ol 


High-level Sewer extension: — 






Charles River valley studies, 


- 


$3,893 71 


Administration, ..... 


$6,497 59 


12,829 76 


Section 80, day work, West Roxbury and 






Brookline, ...... 


94,916 02 


294,961 91 


Section 81, Brookline, .... 


118,465 91 


122.6S5 07 


Section 82, Brookline, .... 


21,904 71 


135,927 31 


Section 82, day work, Park street crossing, . 


10 64 


2,030 IS 


Section 83, Brookline, .... 


63,441 91 


93.S1S 87 


Section 84, Brookline and Brighton, 


2,540 30 


47,592 89 


Section 85, Brighton,. .... 


205,260 61 


206,007 24 


Section 85, day work, Brighton, . 


357 01 


66,611 62 


Section 86, Brighton,. .... 


43,598 46 


43,639 46 


Land takings, purchase and recording, 


2,173 25 


7,921 OS 




'lnO 1fifi 11 


1 ftt7 010 10 




ooy,ioo $i 


-l,v*Od,a±l7 1U 


Total for South Metropolitan System, 


. S559.2SS 41 


SS.741.S69 20 


Total for construction for both systems, . 


. $584,430 37 


SI 4.9 13.034 32 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



65 



Maintenance. 


For the Year 

ending 

December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning 

of Work to 

December 31, 1908. 


North Metropolitan System, ..... 
South Metropolitan System, ..... 


$163,515 60 
97,945 69 


$1,429,759 39 
1,212,005 74 


Total for maintenance, both systems, . 


$261,461 29 


$2,641,765 13 



(7) Detailed Financial Statement. 
The Board herewith presents, in accordance with the Metropolitan 
Sewerage Acts, an abstract of the expenditures and disbursements, 
receipts, assets and liabilities for the year ending December 31, 
1908: — 

(a) Expenditures and Disbursements. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Construction of Works and Acquisition by Purchase or Taking. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Original system, main line and branches: — 

Land takings, purchase and recording, ...... 



Administration: — 

Commissioners, . . . . 

Secretary, . . . . . . . 

Clerks and stenographers, ..... 

Travelling, ........ 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, . 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 

Rent and taxes, main office, ..... 

Miscellaneous expenses, . 



Engineering: — 

Chief engineer, ....... 

Engineering assistants, ..... 

Inspectors, ........ 

Travelling expenses, . . . 

Stationery, printing and office supplies, . 
Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 
Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 

Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 
Rent and taxes, ....... 

Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 



Amount carried forward, 



$25 00 



S528 00 

72 49 

53 58 

7 59 



$2,891 96 

54 30 
125 74 

57 03 

162 73 

22 77 

538 14 



$25 00 



661 66 



3,852 67 



$4,539 33 



66 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character of Expenditures. 


For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


Amount brought forward, ...... 






$4,539 33 


North Metropolitan System — Con. 








Advertising, ......... 




- 




Labor and teaming, ........ 




$8,751 68 




Tools, machinery and appliances, ..... 




450 88 




Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses 




10,720 47 


19,923 03 


Contracts: — 




Sundry bills paid under contract 64, .... 




$218 75 




Real estate: — 








Settlements, . . . 




460 00 




Legal, conveyancing and expert, ..... 




85 


679 60 






Total for North Metropolitan System, 


. $25,141 96 


South Metropolitan System. 






High-level Sewer: — 








Administration: — 








Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 


- 






Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 


- 


- 




Engineers, inspectors, rodmen, laborers and others, 


- 




Tools and repairs of same, ..... 


- 






Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies, . 


- 






Teaming and express, ...... 


- 






Land takings, purchase and recording, 


$122 00 


$122 00 










High-level Sewer Extension: — 






$122 00 




Administration: — 








Commissioners, . . 


$3,500 00 






Secretary, ........ 


1,125 00 






Clerks and stenographers, ..... 


1,348 00 






Travelling, ........ 


- 






Stationery, printing and office supplies, . 


115 40 






Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 


196 99 






Rent and taxes, main office, ..... 


212 20 






Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 


- 


$6,497 59 










Engineering: — 








Chief engineer, ....... 


$3,333 33 






Engineering assistants, ..... 


16,677 69 






Inspectors, ........ 


12,433 35 






Travelling expenses, ...... 


701 20 






Stationery, printing and office supplies, . 


409 07 






Engineering and drafting instruments and tools, 


114 54 






Engineering and drafting supplies, .... 


254 22 






Telephone, lighting, heating, water and care of building, 


770 34 






Amounts carried forward, ..... 


$34,693 74 


$6,497 59 


$122 00 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



67 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Amounts brought forward, .... 

South Metropolitan System — Con. 



$34 693 74 



High-level Sewer Extension — Con. 
Engineering — Con. 

Rent and taxes, ........ 756 48 

Miscellaneous expenses, ...... 961 69 

Advertising $105 19 

Labor and teaming, ........ 59,286 87 

Tools, machinery and appliances, ..... 237 32 

Brick, cement, lumber and other field supplies and expenses, 35,419 96 
Contracts: — 

Bruno & Petitti, Section 81, in part 59,307 70 

Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Section 81, in part, . . 50,601 33 

James Driscoll & Son, Section 82, in part, . . . 6,486 39 

Timothy J. O'Connell, Section 82, in part, . . . 6,944 96 

Timothy J. O'Connell, Section 82, in part, . . . 7,536 61 

Chas. G. Craib & Co., Section 83, in part, . . . 3,975 15 

Timothy J. O'Connell, Section 83, in part, . . . 53,855 14 

D. F. O'Connell, Section 84 2,354 82 

Geo. M. Bryne Co., Section 85, in part, . . . 47,661 63 

Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., Section 85, in part, . . 68,485 40 

D. F. O'ConneU Co., Section 85, in part, . . . 75,718 00 

Glenn & Broderick, near Section 86, ... . 6,993 96 

Chas. J. Jacobs Co., Section 86, 29,113 23 

Real estate: — 

Settlements, $2,132 27 

Legal, conveyancing and expert, . . . . . 40 98 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 

Maintenance and Operation of Works. 

North Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, secretary and assistants, . 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 
Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 

General superintendence: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, .... 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 
Miscellaneous expenses, ..... 

Amount carried forward, ..... 



5,497 59 



$122 00 



36,411 91 



514,083 68 



2,173 25 



559,166 41 



559,288 41 



$4,310 52 

699 12 

506 15 

63 03 



$5,578 82 



$4,990 00 

273 95 

1,519 55 

231 98 



7,015 48 



$12,594 30 



68 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



General Character op Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



Amount brought forward, 



North Metropolitan System — 
Deer Island pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
East Boston pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Charlestown pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Alewife Brook pumping station 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, labor, .... 
Supplies and expenses, . 

Horses, vehicles and stable account, . 
Renewal East Boston pumping station, account 
1908, labor, 
Supplies and expenses, 



Total for North Metropolitan System, 



Con. 



Chelsea fire, April 12 



$14,512 92 

9,485 40 

361 15 
1,220 40 

133 21 

1,021 29 

201 30 

580 64 

18,031 58 

11,694 59 

521 92 

1,726 00 

498 21 

2,917 22 

198 85 

1,510 95 

14,399 33 

3,031 90 

278 16 

494 40 

56 42 

362 67 
158 72 
524 00 

7,826 35 
2,156 52 
231 80 
181 56 
58 67 
708 24 
118 33 
146 52 



$23,998 54 
3,915 48 



$4,942 49 

6,939 16 
15,776 41 



$12,594 30 



95,349 22 



27,914 02 



27.65S 06 



$163,515 60 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



69 



General Character of Expenditures. 



For the Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 



South Metropolitan System. 
Administration: — 

Commissioners, secretary and assistants, . 
Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . . . 

General superintendence: — 

Chief engineer and assistants, .... 

Postage, printing, stationery and office supplies, 
Rent, telephone, heating, lighting and care of building, 
Miscellaneous expenses, . . 



Ward Street pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Quincy pumping station: — 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 
Nut Island screen-house: — 

Labor, 

Coal, . 

Oil and waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Repairs and renewals, 

Telephone and office supplies, 

Miscellaneous supplies and expenses, 

Sewer lines, labor, .... 
Supplies and expenses, . 



City of Boston, for pumping and interest, 
Horses, vehicles and stable account, . 



Total for South Metropolitan System, 



3,742 41 

638 82 

498 77 

12 00 



$4,380 93 

116 24 

1,495 60 

341 50 



$19,113 63 
9,648 U 

365 88 
1,359 60 

336 22 
1,119 87 

132 98 
1,081 69 

6,427 00 

1,799 94' 

30 56 

212 70 

88 62 

99 88 

48 24 

411 91 

7,190 50 

983 46 

51 45 

307 82 

36 65 

104 50 

94 30 

2,348 56 



$20,669 17 
1,633 58 



$4,892 00 



6,334 27 



53,394 40 



22,302 75 
7,700 00 
3,322 27 

$97,945 69 



70 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



(b) Receipts. 

The receipts from the sales of property, from rents and from other 
sources, have been credited as follows : — 



Account. 


For Year ending 
December 31, 1908. 


From Beginning 

of Work to 

December 31, 1908. 


North Metropolitan System, — construction, 
South Metropolitan System, — construction, 
North Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
South Metropolitan System, — maintenance, 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund, 


$18,729 81 

1,300 22 

618 92 

151 53 

172 41 


$35,883 21 

11,406 82 

10,033 92 

1,253 71 

1,191 82 


Totals, 


$20,972 89 


$59,769 48 



(c) Assets. 
The following is an abstract of the assets of the Sewerage Works, 
a complete schedule of which is kept on file in the office of the 
Board : — 

Office furniture, fixtures and supplies; engineering and scientific instruments 
and supplies; horses, vehicles, field machinery, etc.; machinery, tools and 
other appliances and supplies; real estate connected with works not com- 
pleted; completed works, including real estate connected therewith. 



(d) Liabilities. 
There are liabilities as follows : — 

Due on monthly pay rolls, 



,081 49 



There are other current bills unpaid, which have not yet been 
received. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



71 



Amounts on Monthly Estimates, not due until Completion of Contracts or until 

Claims are settled. 



Name. 


Work. 


Amount. 


High-level Sewer : — 








National Contracting Co., . 


Sect. 73, 


contract abandoned, 


$5,516 17 ' 


E. W. Everson & Co., 


Sect. 75, 


.... 


1,000 00 


High-level Sewer Extension : — 








Bruno & Petitti, 


Sect. 81, 


in part, 


4,583 82 


Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., 


Sect. 81, 


in part, 




1,605 49 


Timothy J. O'Connell, 


Sect. 82, 


in part, 




60 00 


Geo. M. Bryne Co., . 


Sect. 85, 


in part, 




2,508 51 


Hugh Nawn Contracting Co., 


Sect. 85, 


in part, 




1,946 60 


D. F. O'Connell Co., . 


Sect. 85, 


in part, 




13,362 00 


Glenn & Broderick, . 


Sect. 86, 


in part, 




1,336 67 


Chas. J. Jacobs Co., . 


Sect. 86, 


. . 




5,137 60 


North Metropolitan Construction : — 








T. H. Gill & Co., 


Sect. 64, 


. 


2,425 90 








$39,482 76 



1 Damages claimed by the Commonwealth on account of the abandonment of the contract ex- 
ceed this amount. 

On the claims of the following it is impossible to state the amounts 
due for land and other damages, as no sums have been agreed upon, 
and suits are now pending in the courts for the determination of 
most of them : — 

Anna L. Dunican, Carrie S. Urquhart, N. Jefferson Urquhart, 
Edwin N. Urquhart, Richard Jones, James Doherty, Michael 
Niland, William H. Gibbons, Francis Eormile, George A. Goddard, 
Boston & Albany Railroad Company. 



VIII. CONSUMPTION OF WATER. 

The average daily consumption of water in the cities and towns 
supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works amounted to 127,301,000 
gallons. This was an increase in the total daily consumption over 
that of last year of 2,230,000 gallons. The average daily consump- 
tion per inhabitant during the year was 134.7 gallons, an increase in 
the daily per capita consumption of 0.9 of a gallon. These are the 
amounts as determined at the pumping stations and by the flow 
through the Weston Aqueduct, and include the estimated yield of 



72 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Spot Pond. The average daily quantity of water measured by the 
Venturi meters as delivered to the various municipalities is, owing 
to leakages from the reservoirs and pipe lines and slightly to the 
use of water at the pumping stations, somewhat less than the amount 
above given, the average daily quantity consumed, according to the 
latter measurement, being 125,441,000 gallons, which is equal to 
133 gallons per inhabitant. The consumption of water, therefore, 
increased in a proportion rather closely corresponding to the in- 
crease of the population, the per capita consumption being but 
slightly greater than that in the preceding year. 

The year was, on the whole, favorable to a lesser consumption, 
owing more especially to the circumstance that there were fewer 
considerable periods of continued very cold weather. The extreme 
dry weather of the warm season prevailed largely after the time 
when the demand is made for the sprinkling of lawns and the water- 
ing of vegetable gardens. There was, however, a marked increase 
in the consumption for certain consecutive days or weeks during 
the summer over similar periods in any previous year. 

There was an increase in the daily per capita consumption in 
10 municipalities and a decrease in 8 municipalities. The large 
amount of water which is wasted or unnecessarily consumed is 
again illustrated by the accompanying diagram, which shows the 
average rate of consumption during the entire day, and the average 
rate of consumption at night between 1 a.m. and 4 a.m., the rates 
of consumption in each case being compared with the average rates 
in the preceding year. The quantity of water passing through the 
pipes between the hours of 1 and 4 in the morning- when there 
is certainly a very small quantity used for any legitimate or neces- 
sary purpose, amounts in the entire district to an average daily 
rate of 84,972,000 gallons, which is 68 per cent, of the entire con- 
sumption, and amounts to 90 gallons per inhabitant. The average 
daily consumption during these hours for the coldest week of the 
year, February 1 to February 8, was 151,873,000 gallons, or 21 
per cent, above the average of the year for the entire day. 

These figures are conclusive in showing that a large proportion 
of the water furnished to the District is wasted, and that tin* waste 
occurs to a Great extent on account of leakages in the local water 
pipes and bad plumbing in the houses. 

The meter act, so called, passed by the Legislature in the year 



diagram showing 

Average Rate of Consumption op Water 

in the Metropolitan District in 1908 

DURING THE ENTIRE DAY 

AND 

BETWEEN THE HOURS OF 1 AND 4- AT NI6HT 

_ u-i !— -*■ z 




Daily Average Rate of Consumption I90d WZK 

•• Night .. between 1A.M. and 4 A.M. 1908.^^ 
DailyAverage Rates of Consumption in 1907 shown in Red : 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 73 

1907, went into effect only at the beginning of the year 1903. Its 
provisions required that all water services installed after December 
31, 1907, should be metered, that after that date 5 per cent, of 
the water services which were then unmetered should annually be 
equipped with water meters, and that thereafter each consumer should 
be charged in proportion to the amount of water used. The returns 
furnished to the Board indicate that the provisions of the act have 
been substantially complied with by all of the municipalities of the 
District except the city of Boston and the town of Revere. The 
city of Boston reports that nothing has been done in the way of 
supplying meters under the provisions of the act. In the town 
of Revere there has been a partial compliance with the act, but 
neither all the new services nor the required percentage of old services 
have been installed. 

Several of the cities and towns have been installing meters at 
a much greater rate than is required by the act, apparently with 
the intention that all of the water services shall be metered at an 
earlv date. All the services in the towns of Milton, Belmont and 
Watertown and the city of Melrose are now metered and nearly 
all of the services in the city of Maiden. 

The influence of meters upon the consumption of water is shown 
in a comparison of the per capita consumption in the cities and 
towns where meters are in general use with that of other cities and 
towns where but few meters have been installed. In Milton, 
Maiden, Watertown and Belmont, where the percentages of meters 
installed were at the beginning of the year respectively 100, 96.1, 
100 and 100, the average per capita rate of consumption in the 
month of February, the period of greatest consumption, was 36, 
44, 53 and 57 gallons. In Revere, Everett, Winthrop and Stone- 
ham, where the general conditions are similar but where the per- 
centages of services metered were at the beginning of the year 
respectively 5.57, 2.25, 3.37 and 2.25, the average per capita con- 
sumption in the same month was respectively 99, 104, 110 and 116 
gallons. 

The most notable instance of the influence of the introduction 
of meters is found in the case of the city of Melrose. At the begin- 
ning of the year the percentage of services metered was 30.85. By 
the persistent effort of the city substantially all of the water serv- 
ices had been metered at the end of the year. The daily per 



74 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

capita consumption was reduced during the year from 118 gallons 
to 89 gallons, and in the month of December the daily per capita 
consumption had been reduced to 61 gallons, — a reduction ex- 
ceeding 47 per cent, as compared with the consumption in December 
of the previous year. 

In the city of Boston the daily per capita rate of consumption 
during the past year was 158 gallons, and during a continuous 
period of one month, in which the largest demands were made upon 
the system, the consumption in that city reached a daily average of 
179 gallons per capita. The city of Boston consumes about 78 per 
cent, of the entire quantity of water furnished, and it is necessary 
to make provision to supply sufficient quantities of water to meet 
the requirements for continuous periods of months, if not of weeks, 
rather than for the entire year. 

In this city at the end of the year 1908 there had been installed 
meters on 5,372 services out of a total of 94,960 in use, being 5.7 
per cent, of the whole number of services. Of the 1,177 new serv- 
ices installed in the year only 98 were metered. 

It is true that in Boston the quantity of water used for business 
and manufacturing purposes is large, and the travelling and subur- 
ban population from outside the city, which uses the water, is 
not included in the census population which forms the basis for the 
rate of consumption. These circumstances, however, do not account 
for the very great rate of consumption in that city. That there is 
unnecessary consumption and waste of water is shown from the fact 
that between the hours of 1 and 4 in the morning the rate of con- 
sumption is about 68 per cent, of that for the entire day. 

A comparison of the daily use of water in the various districts 
of the city further shows that the consumption of water for business 
purposes and by travelling and suburban visitors does not account 
for the excessive rate of consumption. For instance, in the Brighton 
high-service district, which is almost entirely residential, the con- 
sumption during the month of May last, which was not exceptional, 
was at the average daily rate of 184 gallons per person, and between 
the hours of 1 and 4 in the morning the lowest rate on any one 
day of .that month was 127 gallons per person. The daily per capita 
rate of consumption in that month was in Brighton 184 gallons, 
and in West Roxbury, also a residential section, was 147 gallons. 

The increasing consumption, especially during the two or three 
months in the year when the greatest demands are made upon the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 75 

supply, has become so great as to equal if uot to exceed the capacities 
of the aqueducts, pipe Hues aud pumpiug facilities. The Board 
has repeatedly urged, not only upon the city of Boston but also 
upon the other cities and towns of the District, the adoption of 
measures which shall check and prevent, through the introduction 
of meters and more rigorous inspection, or otherwise, the waste 
and unnecessary consumption of water which has prevailed to a 
greater or less extent in the different municipalities. It has been 
compelled to seek from the present Legislature appropriations, 
which seem immediately necessary as a matter of safety, for an 
additional supply main to bring water from the terminus of the 
Weston Aqueduct at the Charles River, and for additional pumping 
machinery at Chestnut Hill, at an estimated cost of $900,000. 
These additions might have been deferred for a considerable period 
were it not for the startling increase in recent years in the consump- 
tion of water, which has gone far beyond the original calculations 
made by the State Board of Health of the probable or possible require- 
ments of the District. 

The careful investigations which have been made demonstrate, 
in the opinion of the Board, that at least one-third of the present 
consumption of the District is not only unnecessary but wasteful. 
Unless the present rate of consumption is soon largely decreased the 
time is not far distant when still further works will be required 
and new sources of supply must be acquired, both much in advance 
of the time when it was expected that they would be called for. 

While the expenditures incurred under the appropriations made 
for the Metropolitan Water Supply are returned to the State treas- 
ury by the municipalities of the Metropolitan District, and the 
expenditures are ultimately met by the individual water takers 
through the payment of the water rates, and while the various 
municipalities are themselves peculiarly called upon to use every 
effort to postpone as long as possible extensions to the water system, 
it would seem to be the duty of the Commonwealth to take such 
action as would tend to prevent unnecessary and wasteful consump- 
tion of water, even in' justice to the residents of those other dis- 
tricts in the Commonwealth whose lands must be taken and other 
properties affected in value and whose business interests must be 
impaired when the exigency arises for taking further sources of 
water supply. 



76 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



IX. ELECTROLYSIS. 

Investigations have been continued during the year relative to 
the damages being caused to the water pipes by the electric currents 
maintained by the street railways where their tracks approach the 
main pipe lines. Measurements have been made throughout the 
District of the currents of electricity which have been caused to 
flow along the various pipe lines, and to further this work, and, 
if desired, to control the currents, four more insulating joints have 
been installed. 

The investigations show in several places an increasing current 
of electricity and consequent increasing injury from electrolysis, 
particularly on the westerly low-service pipe line between the Chest- 
nut Hill Reservoir and the Mystic River, the low-service pipe line 
between Chestnut Hill Reservoir and the Maiden River and the 
low-service pipe line in Chelsea and Everett. 

The 48-inch pipe line in Boylston Street, Cambridge, between 
the Charles River and Eliot Street, for a distance of nearly 1,000 
feet has become so affected that it may become necessary to replace 
the pipes during the coming year at a considerable expense. It is, 
of course, difficult in many places to determine the exact condition 
of the pipes, as this cannot be ascertained without excavating the 
trenches. 

X. LEGISLATION IN THE YEAR 1908. 

Acts were passed by the Legislature of the year 1908 making an 
annual appropriation for the maintenance and operation of the 
Metropolitan Water System of $433,000 (chapter 198) ; and like 
appropriations for the N"orth Metropolitan Sewerage System of 
$146,000 (chapter 211) and for the South Metropolitan Sewerage 
System of $105,000 (chapter 213). A special act was also passed 
to authorize the Board to restore the East Boston sewerage pumping 
station and to erect other buildings recently damaged and destroyed 
by fire, and the sum of $40,000 payable from the maintenance fund 
was appropriated (chapter 582). 

The Board was authorized to expend from the Water Loan Fund 
in various sums an amount aggregating $591,500, and further loans 
were authorized to an amount not exceeding $398,000 (chapter 558), 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 77 

The Board was also authorized to construct extensions and addi- 
tions to the Deer Island and East Boston pumping stations and the 
total sum of $445,000 was appropriated, and further loans on account 
of the North Metropolitan Sewerage System were authorized to the 
extent of $413,000 (chapter 556). 

By chapter 560 the Board was authorized, upon the application 

of the town of Swampscott and upon its payment of such sum as 

the Board might fix, to include the town in the Metropolitan Water 

District, and to furnish it with water under the terms prescribed 

. by the Metropolitan Water Act. 

XI. RECOMMENDATIONS FOR ADDITIONAL WATER AND SEWER- 
AGE LOANS. 

The Board, in its abstract of the annual report to the Legislature 
at the beginning of the session of the year 1909, made the following 
statements and recommendations regarding additional water loans 
for necessary construction for the coming year and the discharge 
of liabilities already accrued and existing : — 

" It appears from the foregoing financial statement that on Decem- 
ber 1, 1908, the balance remaining unexpended on account of the 
amount of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund, authorized for the 
construction and acquisition of works, was $393,141.13. 

" The Legislature of last year authorized expenditures on account of 
the Metropolitan Water Works as follows: for a power plant at the 
Wachusett Dam, a sum not exceeding $115,000 ; for concrete walls 
and tile floor at the gate and power house at Wachusett Dam, a sum 
not exceeding $7,000; for a new 48-inch main from Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir to the Boston city line, a sum not exceeding $190,000 ; 
for the completion of the Arlington pumping station and its equip- 
ment, a sum not exceeding $14,500 ; for the construction of sewers, 
cesspools and other improvements necessary on the watershed of the 
Wachusett Reservoir, a sum not exceeding $5,000 ; for settlement of 
suits now pending in the courts and for claims and reserves payable 
on completed contracts, a sum not exceeding $260,000, making a 
total of $591,500. 

i The work of laying the new 48-inch main from Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir has been begun, and the sum of $53,009.26 has been so 
far expended upon it; the sum of $9,453.03 has been expended 



78 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

toward the completion of the Arlington pumping station; and the 
sum of $2,837.88 has been thus far spent upon improvements on 
the watershed of the Wachusett Reservoir. The sum of $114,033.54 
has been expended in the settlement of suits and claims and the 
payment of balances due on uncompleted contracts. There was also 
expended, in connection with the Wachusett Dam and Reservoir, 
the Weston Aqueduct, the Distribution System and for the com- 
pletion of other minor works, the sum of $27,083.62. 

"It is expected that all the work begun under the above-named 
appropriations of last year will be completed within the amounts 
allowed; and, inasmuch as some of the most important suits have 
been settled for less than the amounts claimed, it is estimated that 
the balance of the appropriation made for this purpose will be more 
than sufficient to meet the suits and claims still remaining unsettled. 

" No work has been undertaken under the appropriation for a power 
plant at Wachusett Dam and for the walls and floor of the power 
house, for which payments of $115,000 and $7,000 were respectively 
authorized. The construction of the power plant and the laying 
of the floor in the power house have necessarily been postponed to 
await a determination in negotiations which have been pending with 
the officials of the town of Clinton for the disposal of the power 
to be generated, and for fixing the valuation of the plant for purposes 
of taxation. 

" In addition to completing the work already authorized, it is 
deemed necessary by the Board to continue, in accordance with the 
requirements of the original Metropolitan Water Act, measures for 
removing from the watersheds the more threatening sources of pollu- 
tion and for the purification of the water supplied to the District. 
Much of this work, in order to be accomplished economically, must 
be carried out when the favorable opportunities occur, or must be 
undertaken when the emergencies arise. It is recommended that 
the expenditure of $15,000, in addition to the balance of last year's 
appropriation, be authorized for this purpose. 

" There should also be sums available for small extensions of the 
Distribution System, which are from time to time called for, for 
furnishing supplies of water to the various portions of the Metro- 
politan District in the quantities or at the pressures required under 
their changing circumstances. For this purpose it is recommended 
that authority be given to expend a sum not exceeding $10,000. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 79 

" It has become necessary to construct a new main for supplying 
water to the town of Winthrop. So long as water was furnished for 
the supply of the towns of Revere and Winthrop through the Revere 
Water Company, the water for both towns was delivered to the Com- 
pany at a point in the town of Revere. The town of Revere has 
now, however, acquired the property of the Water Company, and 
water is furnished by the Metropolitan Works directly to the two 
towns. The town of Revere, consequently, owns a small portion of 
the pipe line through which the Metropolitan supply is furnished 
to the town of Winthrop. The Metropolitan Water Act requires the 
Board to supply each city and town by delivering the water into 
a main pipe or reservoir of the city or town; and now, inasmuch as 
the town of Revere is about to require the old main for its own 
purposes, it will be necessary to supply the place of the town's main 
by a new main, at an estimated expense of $14,500. 

" There is the balance of $393,141.13 remaining still unexpended 
for which loans have been authorized, which will cover all sums re- 
quired to complete the operations already undertaken under last 
year's appropriations, to construct and equip the power plant and 
finish the power house at the Wachusett Dam, to satisfy unsettled 
suits and claims, and, in addition, to provide for the proposed 
ajrpropriations above recommended for the ordinary or necessary 
operations of the Board. 

•" There are some larger needs of the District, to which the Board 
is compelled in the present year to call the attention of the Legis- 
lature. The increasing consumption of water in the District neces- 
sitates, in its judgment, the beginning of the construction of some 
additional works of distribution of the water supply which it has 
been hoped might be postponed for some years to come. 

' The present trouble arises not from the lack of water in storage, 
but from the want of sufficient means to bring the necessary supply 
of water from the storage reservoirs into the District. The water 
in the Wachusett and Sudbury reservoirs, the main sources of sup- 
ply, is brought into the District by the Sudbury and Weston aque- 
ducts. The Sudbury Aqueduct is capable of bringing 100,000,000 
gallons of water per clay to the Chestnut Hill Reservoir and pumping 
stations. The new Weston Aqueduct is built with a capacity of 
300,000,000 gallons per day, and extends from the Sudbury Reser- 
voir only as far as the Charles River. From this terminal point 



80 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

of the aqueduct a single main pipe line with a capacity of 30,000.000 
gallons per day has thus far been laid into the District, and it is 
in accordance with the original scheme that additional mains shall 
be laid from this terminus into the District from time to time as 
they shall be required. 

" The other source of supply is Lake Cochituate, from which water 
is brought by the Cochituate Aqueduct, having a capacity when in 
use of 20,000,000 gallons daily. 

" The possible maximum capacity, therefore, of all the aqueducts 
and the pipe line for bringing water into the District is 150,000,000 
gallons per day; but this maximum is for considerable periods re- 
duced to 130,000,000 gallons, because there are times, particularly 
in the winter season, when the consumption is the greatest, when 
the Cochituate water is unsuitable for drinking purposes and is 
shut off. 

" The consumption of water in the District, which is constantly in- 
creasing, has at times already become so great as to equal if not to 
exceed the present capacity of all the aqueducts and pipe line, so as 
to compel at times the drawing down of the distributing reservoirs 
within the District. The present average daily demand for consump- 
tion is 128,000,000 gallons, but during continuous periods of two or 
three months in the winter the average daily consumption reaches 
140,000,000 gallons, and it is estimated that by the time a new pipe 
line can be placed in operation such consumption will reach a daily 
rate of 154,000,000 gallons. Allowing, however, even for a very 
moderate increase in the present consumption, the present facilities 
for furnishing water to the various portions of the District will, by the 
time the new works can be constructed and put into operation, be 
severely taxed. 

" The Board believes it wiser and more economical to lay a 60-inch 
main instead of a 48-inch main ; and it accordingly recommends that 
authority be given to lay such a main from the terminus of the 
Weston Aqueduct at Charles River to make connection with the 
present mains near Chestnut Hill Reservoir, a distance of about 7 
miles, at an estimated cost of $750,000. Such a main will have 
a daily capacity of 47,000,000 gallons. 

" For like reasons the Board deems that it has become necessary to 
provide an additional pumping engine for the high service at the 
Chestnut Hill pumping station. Arrangements were made two years 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 81 

ago for the utilization of the low-service station, in order temporarily 
to provide for emergencies which might arise in the high service. 
The called-for extensions of the high service, as well as the increas- 
ing consumption, are making such demands upon the pumping 
service that the Board is compelled to believe that it is unsafe to 
put off longer the installation of an additional pumping engine for 
the high service. 

" The Chestnut Hill high-service station has at present one engine 
having a capacity for pumping 30,000,000 gallons daily, and three 
small engines having a combined daily capacity of 36,000,000 gal- 
lons. There are periods when the large engine (as well as the smaller 
engines) will by accident or otherwise be put out of service, and 
in such times the total daily pumping capacity of the station is 
reduced to 36,000,000 gallons. The present consumption of the 
district supplied is nearly 38,000,000 gallons daily, and for certain 
continuous periods it now reaches 44,000,000 gallons per day. It 
is estimated that by the time an additional engine can be installed 
the average daily consumption of this district will reach 46,500,000 
gallons, and that the consumption for considerable periods will re- 
quire the daily pumping of 52,500,000 gallons. 

" The Board recommends that authority be given to contract for the 
construction of a new engine, having a daily capacity of 30,000,000 
gallons, at an estimated expense of $150,000. 

" An act was passed by the last Legislature permitting the admis- 
sion of the town of Swampscott into the Metropolitan Water District. 
The town has been supplied with water from the Metropolitan Dis- 
trict for the past ten years, under a contract which has just expired. 
The furnishing of water to that town and to the town of Nahant, 
which was admitted into the District, necessitated supplying water 
to these towns through the main which was originally designed and 
used only for the municipalities of Everett, Chelsea, Revere and 
Winthrop. The large increase in the consumption of all these cities 
and towns has had the effect, at times of great demand, seriously 
to decrease the pressure in both Nahant and Swampscott, which 
are now situated at the end of the pipe line. If the town of Swamp- 
scott shall be admitted into the Metropolitan Water District, as is 
now proposed, it will be necessary to lay an additional main in 
Everett, Chelsea and Revere, for a distance of a little over 2 miles, 
at an estimated cost of $68,000. 



82 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

" The Board accordingly recommends that, in addition to complet- 
ing the works and making the expenditures authorized by the 
Legislature of last year, it be empowered to expend: for the pro- 
tection and purification of the waters of the Wachusett watershed, 
a sum not exceeding $15,000 ; for making small extensions of the 
Distribution System, a sum not exceeding $10,000 ; and for con- 
structing a new main for the town of Winthrop, a sum not ex- 
ceeding $14,500, — for all which the loans already authorized will 
be sufficient. 

" The Board also recommends that authority be given to make ex- 
penditures for the following works : — 

For laying a water main from the terminus of the Weston Aqueduct 
to a connection near the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, a sum not ex- 
ceeding $750,000 

For an additional pumping engine for the high service at the Chest- 
nut Hill pumping station, a sum not exceeding .... 150,000 

For laying a new main in Everett, Chelsea and Revere, a sum not 

exceeding . . . 68,000 

Total, $968,000 

" For accomplishing these purposes, authority will be required for 
issuing additional Metropolitan Water Loans to the amount of 
$968,000." 

It was also suggested that legislation should be adopted for the 
protection of the distributing reservoirs from the large numbers of 
gulls and ducks which make especially Spot Pond and the Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir their resort, as follows : — 

" Much complaint has been made to the Board from time to time 
regarding the numbers of gulls and wild ducks which resort, par- 
ticularly in the spring and autumn months of the year, to the dis- 
tributing reservoirs in the Metropolitan District. The trouble arises 
principally at Spot Pond, where the number of these birds has on 
a single day reached apparently as many as 2,000. The gulls are 
found in rather larger numbers than the ducks. 

" The presence of these birds causes an offensive condition at the 
points in the pond where they particularly congregate, which tends 
to pollute the water, and they are certainly a menace to the public 
health. 

" Various means have been taken to drive the birds from the pond. 
Blank cartridges have been fired to a very considerable extent, both 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 83 

from the shores and from boats, but the relief has been only tempo- 
rary, particularly in the case of the gulls. It would seem that the 
gulls especially, though at first frightened, have quickly learned to 
recognize that the shooting is harmless. It is possible that if pro- 
vision should be made to enable the Board to provide and man a 
motor boat, which should frequently patrol the pond, the birds might 
be kept away from the pond; but the experiments which have been 
made indicate that such a patrol would not prove effective in driving 
away the gulls, at least. 

" Under the statutes of the Commonwealth gulls and certain kinds 
of ducks are protected throughout the year, while other ducks are 
protected during a portion of the year. 

" The Board suggests that some employes of the Board, specially 
authorized thereto, be empowered under proper regulations to shoot 
gulls and ducks when resorting in considerable numbers to the dis- 
tributing reservoirs of the Metropolitan Water Works, so that, in 
case other methods fail, this means of relief may be adopted for the 
protection of the water supply.' 7 

Bills have also been introduced, at the instance of the Board, 
first, to define more clearly the law regarding annual payments in 
lieu of taxes to cities and towns in which lands are held for water- 
supply purposes, and second, to authorize the Board to furnish 
water for the supply of sections of cities and towns in which the 
water-pipe system is owned hj sl city or town within the Metro- 
politan Water District. 

No new appropriations for the Sewerage Works were called for, 
but report was made concerning the expenditures for the enlarge- 
ment of the Deer Island and East Boston pumping stations and the 
High-level Sewer extension. 

' The Board was authorized by the Legislature of the year 1908 to 
proceed in the North Metropolitan System upon the enlargement 
of the East Boston and Deer Island pumping stations and the instal- 
lation of new engines and pumps, and for these purposes was au- 
thorized to expend in the years 1908, 1909 and 1910 the sums of 
$250,000 and $195,000 respectively. 

' The work of enlarging the Deer Island station has been begun, 
and a contract has been awarded for the building of the new engine 
and boilers for the station. There was expended on account of this 
enlargement, during the past fiscal year, the sum of $17,342.59. 



84 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

" The great fire in Chelsea, which occurred in April of last year, 
caused the partial destruction of the East Boston pumping station, 
and the total destruction of the stable, locker and other buildings 
connected with it. It was necessary to repair the station and the 
pumping engines with the greatest possible expedition, in order that 
the interruption in sewage disposal should not injuriously affect the 
health of that portion of the District. Eor this purpose a special 
appropriation of $40,000 was provided, which was made chargeable 
to maintenance. The occurrence of the fire, however, induced the 
Board to defer for a time the construction of the enlargement of 
the station, and to enter upon a careful investigation as to the future 
requirements of the North Metropolitan System. It has finally been 
determined advisable to proceed as contemplated with the plan of 
enlarging the station originally adopted. The work upon these two 
pumping stations does not call for any further appropriations. 

" The land in East Boston on which the stable and locker buildings 
had been erected was sold for the sum of $17,500. The Board was 
authorized by the last Legislature to use the money received from 
this sale for the purchase of land and the erection of stable and 
locker buildings thereon, and this sum is believed to be sufficient 
for the purpose. 

" The Legislature of the year 1906 made provision for the extension 
of the High-level Sewer in the South Metropolitan System through 
portions of Boston and Brookline, for which an appropriation of 
$1,175,000 was made. The work of constructing this extension has 
been continued during the past year with an expenditure of $567,- 
865.15 ; and will probably be completed by the middle of the current 
year. The construction of the extension of the High-level Sewer 
will be accomplished within the amount appropriated." 

XII. FUTURE WORK. 

The maintenance and operation, for the year 1909, of the various 
works for the water supply and distribution of water in the cities 
and towns in the Metropolitan Water District, and of the works 
constructed for the collection and disposal of the sewage in the 
various cities and towns in the North and South Metropolitan 
Sewerage districts, will require, according to the estimates given 
to the State Auditor, a total expenditure of $699,100. The Board 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 85 

has included in this amount the sum of $30,000, which it deems 
necessary to expend in order to carry on the improvements which 
have been made in the Snake Brook branch of Lake Cochituate. 
It is proposed to divert the street washings and other overflows in 
the village of Cochituate and the contents of a small brook which 
flows through the village, so that they shall not be discharged into 
the lake or any of its tributaries. 

The laying of the new 48-inch main from Chestnut Hill to the 
boundary line between the town of Brookline and the city of Bos- 
ton, in order to reinforce the water supply of that city, will be 
continued and finished within the year. 

The increasing consumption of water in the District has com- 
pelled the Board to ask for authority to construct a second main 
from the terminus of the Weston Aqueduct into the District, and, 
if authority is granted, the Board will proceed to lay a 60-inch main 
line for a distance of about seven miles, and will also proceed to 
have built a new pumping engine having a daily capacity of 30,- 
000,000 gallons, to be installed at Chestnut Hill for the high service. 

It is probable that the town of Swampscott will seek admission 
into the Metropolitan Water District in accordance with the terms 
of the act which was passed by the Legislature of last year. In case 
the town shall be admitted into the District, or even in case the 
contract for supplying water to that town, which has just expired, 
shall be renewed, it will be necessary to lay an additional main in 
Everett, Chelsea and Revere for a distance of a little over two miles. 

To fulfil the requirements of the Metropolitan Water Act the 
Board will be obliged in the coming year to lay a new main in the 
town of Winthrop, for a length of about three-quarters of a mile ; 
to take the place of an old main now belonging to the town of Revere, 
and which is required by that town for its own purposes. 

Extensions of the distribution system become necessary each year 
in order to provide for the new connections which are made in differ- 
ent localities of the District. The request has very recently been 
made for an extension of the high-service mains in the town of 
Belmont to a section of that town which the town is about to provide 
with a water supply, and similar necessities are from time to time 
arising in the different parts of the District. 

The Board will also be expected to continue the policy originally 
called for by the report of the State Board of Health in 1895, of 



86 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

gradually removing the more threatening sources of pollution and 
pursuing measures for the purification of the water supply. 

The installation of a power plant at the Wachusett Dam has been 
deferred to await the determination of the town of Clinton regarding 
the valuation for taxation of the proposed plant and the disposal 
of the power which may be produced. 

There still remain for settlement and adjustment suits and claims 
for a considerable amount on account of the construction and acqui- 
sition of works. 

The extension of the High-level Sewer from its connection at 
Jamaica Plain with the main sewer to a point near the boundary 
line in Brighton and Newton will be completed early in the current 
year. 

The work which is already begun will be continued upon the en- 
largement of the Deer Island pumping station in the North Metro- 
politan District, and it is expected that a corresponding enlargement 
of the East Boston pumping station will be entered upon early in 
the year. 

The Board has been making, through its engineers, investigations 
of the future needs of the North Metropolitan System, in which, 
during the twenty years since it was established, there has been 
much increase of population and business. Some of the lines of 
sewers, notably the Mystic valley main sewer, are approaching the 
limits of their capacities, and it is anticipated that the question of 
the future provision for that System will be brought under the 
consideration of the Board during the current year. 

The detailed reports of the Chief Engineer of the Water Works 
and of the Chief Engineer of the Sewerage Works, with various 
tables and statistics, are herewith presented. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HENRY H. SPRAGUE. 
HENRY P. WALCOTT. 
JAMES A. BAILEY. Jr. 

Boston, February 26, 1909. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 87 



REPORT OP CHIEF ENGINEER OP WATER WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the work under the 
charge of the Chief Engineer of the Metropolitan Water Works for 
the year ending December 31, 1908. 

General Statement. 
The work under the charge of the Chief Engineer includes not 
only the construction of new works but also the maintenance and 
operation of the works ; and as the construction work, which was 
begun in 1895, was practically finished in 1906, the work at present 
is principally connected with the maintenance and operation of works 
already built. There has been, however, some construction work 
in progress during the past year, the principal items of which are 
a new 48-inch main for increasing the supply of water in the Bos- 
ton low-service district, an extension of a 16-inch supply main in 
Arlington, the construction of stop-planks and fence at the overflow 
of the Wachusett Dam, the removal of soil from the Wachusett 
Reservoir and the completion and testing of the pumping engines 
at the new Arlington station. 

Organization. 

The position of Superintendent of Pipe Lines and Reservoirs 
in the Distribution Department was made vacant on July 17 by 
the death of George E. Wilde, who had held the office since the works 
were first operated, on January 1, 1898. Samuel E. Killam, who 
had previously been employed in the engineering force, was pro- 
moted to fill the position made vacant by Mr. Wilde's death. 

The principal assistants employed under the direction of the 
Chief Engineer at the close of the year were as follows : — 



88 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Elliot R. B. Allardice, 
Charles E. Haberstroh, 
Samuel E. Killam, . 

Arthur E. O'Neil, . 

William E. Foss, 

Alfred 0. Doane, 

Benjamin F. Hancox, 
William E. Whittaker, 
Arthur W. Walker, . 
William W. Locke, . 



Superintendent, Wachusett Department. 

Superintendent , Sudbury Department. 

Superintendent, Pipe Lines and Reservoirs, Dis- 
tribution Department. 

Superintendent, Pumping Stations, Distribution De- 
partment. 

Division Engineer, specially in charge of electrolytic 
investigations and pipe laying. 

Division Engineer, specially in charge of engineering 
work at pumping stations. 

Assistant in charge of Drafting Department. 

Office Assistant. 

Biologist. 

Sanitary Inspector. 



At the beginning of the year the engineering force, including 
those engaged upon both the construction and maintenance of the 
works, numbered 45, and at the end of the year 40. 

There has also been a maintenance force, exclusive of the engi- 
neers above mentioned, averaging 251, employed in the operation 
of the several pumping stations and in connection with the main- 
tenance of the reservoirs, aqueducts and pipe lines, and in doing- 
minor construction work. 

The number of men employed in the several departments has 
been as follows : — 



Beginning 


End of 


of Year. 


Year. 


48 


40 


46 


62 


66 


70 


58 


61 


218 


233 



Average. 



Wachusett Department, 

Sudbury Department 

Distribution Department, Pipe Lines and Reservoirs, 
Distribution Department, Pumping Service, 



56 
61 
72 
62 



251 



CONSTRUCTION. 
Wachusett Reservoir axd Dam. 

Soil Stripping. 

Additional clearing and grubbing and the removal of soil have 

been necessary at a number of points along the south shore of the 

reservoir between the southerly end of the South Dike in Boylston 

and Worcester Street in West Boylston, also along the north shore 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 89 

at Kendall Cove and Thomas Basin. This work was due to the 
caving away of the banks beyond the limits of the original soil 
stripping or of the additional soil stripping done in the previous 
year. The soil has been stripped for an aggregate length of 12,240 
feet of shore line, for a width varying from 5 to 50 feet, the aggre- 
gate area being 3.43 acres. The total cost of doing this work was 
$1,685.45. 

Work at Wachusett Dam. 

All of the stop-planks required for use on the waste-weir of the 
dam have been made. They are of hard pine, 9 feet 11 inches 
long, 6 inches deep, fitted with a drop-forged steel hook at each end 
for use in placing and removing the planks. One hundred and 
twenty of the planks, for use on the low-level portion of the waste- 
way, are 6 inches thick at the centre, tapering to 4 inches at either 
end where they enter the grooves. The balance, 330 in number, 
are 4 inches thick for their entire length. They were made by the 
maintenance force at a cost, including material, of $1,992.20. 

An industrial railway track with a gage of 21% inches has been 
laid on the bridge over the waste-weir, and a small hand car has 
been made for use in transporting the stop-planks from the storage 
room in the bastion chamber to the waste-weir. 

A 1%-inch pipe-rail fence with 2-inch posts 3 feet high has been 
erected on the up-stream side of the waste-weir bridge for its en- 
tire length, for the protection of the men employed in placing or 
removing the stop-planks. 

At the close of 1907 the work of filling and pointing with Port- 
land cement mortar the expansion cracks in the joints of the ashlar 
facing of the up-stream face of the dam had been completed to 
elevation 384. This work was continued to elevation 405, or 10 
feet above full-reservoir level, during the early portion of the year. 

Improvement of Watershed. 

The dams at the sites of the Tietze Mills in Holden, and the 
Henry E. Stone Mill in Sterling, have been torn down so as to drain, 
the old mill-ponds ; the buildings on the properties have been re- 
moved, cellar holes graded and the grounds cleaned, so as to leave 
them in a neat and sanitary condition. 

Three 1%-story dwelling houses on property formerly owned by 
0. L. Bates in Clinton, a 1%-story dwelling house and barn on 



90 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

property formerly owned by M. W. Houghton in West Boylston, 
and an ice house and store house on the Gates property in Sterling, 
have been torn down and the premises cleared and graded. 

Cesspools and diverting ditches have been built on the property 
of A. A. Wilson in West Boylston, and on the C. E. Boyle estate 
in Sterling, in order to prevent objectionable drainage from entering 
the brooks tributary to the Wachusett Reservoir. 

]STew 48-inch Supply Main for the Boston Low-service 

District. 

An act authorizing the expenditure of $190,000 for laying an 
additional 48-inch main from a point near Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
through Beacon Street, Harvard Street and Longwood Avenue to 
the Boston line, was approved on May 29, 1908. On August 1 a 
contract was made with the W T arren Foundry and Machine Company 
of Phillipsburgh, E". J., for furnishing 4,100 tons of 48-inch pipe, 
60 tons of 36-inch pipe and 130 tons of special castings required 
for the work; on August 26 a contract was made with the Coffin 
Valve Company of Boston for supplying 10 36-inch and 8 12-inch 
valves, and on September 5 a contract was made with Bruno & 
Petitti of Boston for laying the pipes. The work of laying the 
pipes was begun on September 16, and on December 6 the portion 
of the pipe line extending from the Riverway, near Longwood 
Avenue, in Boston, to Coolidge Corner in Brookline, a distance of 
3,471 feet, had been laid and connected with a 48-inch main be- 
longing to the city of Boston, so that this portion of the new line 
can be placed in service as soon as the city completes the work of 
extending the main from the Riverway to Brookline Avenue. Work 
will be resumed as soon as the frost leaves the ground, and it is 
expected that the main will be completed to Chestnut Hill Reservoir 
on August 1, 1909. The amount expended on account of the work 
to December 31 was $64,569.27. 

Arlington Pumping Station. 
At the beginning of the year the pumping station building was 
completed, one engine and two boilers installed and in operation, 
and a second engine completed in the shops of the Blake & Knowles 
Steam Pump Works, ready to be placed in position. This engine 
was delivered, erected and the necessary steam and water connec- 





Making Connection between NEW 48-INCH MAIN and BOSTON WATER 
WORKS MAIN in Beacon Street, Brookline. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 91 

tions made during the month of January, and was first operated on 
February 8. It is of the horizontal, duplex, compound, condensing, 
direct-acting type, with outside packed plungers. The steam cylin- 
ders are 11 inches and 22 inches in diameter and are jacketed on 
both heads and barrels. The pump plungers are 12 inches in di- 
ameter, and both steam pistons and water plungers have a stroke 
of 18 inches. There is a Worthington condenser in the suction 
main near the engine, with a cooling surface of 250 square feet, 
and connected with the exhaust steam pipes a feed-water heater 
fitted with a brass pipe coil, giving 26 square feet of heating sur- 
face. The condensed steam is pumped by an independent air pump 
of the Blake single-acting horizontal type, having 5%-inch steam 
cylinder, 8-inch water cylinder and 7-inch stroke. 

The water pumped at this station is taken under pressure from 
a 20-inch low-service main, and the pressure on the suction side of 
the pumps is about 23.5 pounds. The contract for this engine 
stipulated that it should have a capacity of 1,500,000 gallons in 
twenty-four hours, with a piston speed of not over 95 feet per 
minute. The duty guaranteed was 50,000,000 foot-pounds per 1,000 
pounds of steam when pumping against a total head of 290 feet with 
a steam pressure not exceeding 125 pounds per square inch. The 
final test of the engine was made on May 25 and 26, with the fol- 
lowing results : — 



Duration of trial (hours), 24 

Average head pumped against (feet), 290.12 

Plunger speed (feet per minute), 95.825 

Total quantity pumped : — 

Basis of plunger displacement (gallons), 1,578,865 

Measured by Venturi meter (gallons), 1,551,400 

Steam used by engine, jackets and air pump (pounds), . . 62,853.5 

Duty per 1,000 pounds dry steam (foot pounds), . . . 60,727,400 

Duty per 100 pounds of moist coal (foot-pounds), . . . 52,122,480 
Evaporation of boiler per pound of moist coal from and at 

212° F. (pounds), "... 9.821 

The engine furnished by the Allis-Chalmers Company was erected 
in 1907 and has been in almost constant use during the past year. 
The official duty trials, however, were delayed for various reasons, 
and the final tests were not completed until January 7, 1909. This 
engine is of the horizontal, cross-compound, fly-wheel type, fitted 



92 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



with Corliss valve gear, and operates two horizontal, outside-packed 
plunger pumps. The high and low pressure steam pistons are 14 
inches and 28 inches in diameter, respectively, and the pump plun- 
gers Si/o inches in diameter, all having a stroke of 18 inches. The 
contract stipulated that the engine should have a capacity of 1,500,- 
000 gallons in twenty-four hours when operated at a plunger speed 
of 195 feet per minute against a head of 290 feet, and when operated 
at that rate should show a duty of 120,000,000 foot-pounds per 
1,000 pounds of dry steam; also, that when pumping at the rate 
of 750,000 gallons in twenty-four hours the engine should show a 
duty of 110,000,000 foot-pounds per 1,000 pounds of steam, the 
engine to be supplied with steam under a pressure of 125 pounds 
per square inch. The contract also provided for a bonus of $100 
or a penalty of $200 for each 1,000,000 foot-pounds excess or de- 
ficiency, as compared with the guaranteed duty. The results of the 
trials of this engine were as follows : — 

One-half Capacity Trial, made December 31, 1908-January 1, 1909. 

Duration of trial (hours), ........ 24 

Average head pumped against (feet), . . . . . 290.11 

Plunger speed (feet per minute), 95.905 

Total quantity pumped : — 

Basis of plunger displacement (gallons), .... 771,360 

Measured by Venturi meter (gallons), 763,525 

Steam used by engine, jackets and air pump (pounds), . . 17,671 

Duty per 1,000 pounds of dry steam (foot-pounds), . . . 106,742,470 

Full Capacity Trial, January 6-7, 1909. 

Duration of trial (hours), ........ 24 

Average head pumped against (feet), 290.3 

Plunger speed (feet per minute), ...... 191.346 

Total quantity pumped : — 

Basis of plunger displacement (gallons), .... 1,538,977 

Measured by Venturi meter (gallons), 1,530,986 

Steam used by engine, jackets and air pump (pounds), . . 32,475 

Duty per 1,000 pounds dry steam (foot-pounds), . . . 115,959,370 

Duty per 100 pounds of moist coal (foot-pounds), . . . 90,025,832 
Evaporation of boiler per pound of moist coal from and at 

212° F. (pounds), 9.77 

The duty developed by the engine on both trials was less than 
guaranteed, and there will be deducted from the contract price, in 
accordance with the terms of the contract, the sum of $1,459.63. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 93 

Other work done at this station has been the construction of a 
cast-iron floor around the Allis-Chalmers engine, furnished by the 
G. W. and F. Smith Iron Company of Boston, and erected by the 
regular employes of the station. The steam piping in connection 
with the Blake engine and the tops of the boilers were covered with 
non-conducting covering by the C. W. Trainer Manufacturing Com- 
pany. An electric indicator has been installed for the purpose of 
indicating high and low water mark in the Arlington standpipe. 
The grounds about the station have been graded, seeded and planted 
with shrubbery. 

The principal items of cost of this station, exclusive of engineer- 
ing, are as follows : — 

Building, including chimney and engine and boiler foundations, $33,208 12 

Engines, 14,233 43 

Boilers and setting, . . 6,156 38 

Piping for engines, boilers, heating, etc., . . . . 2,859 31 

Railroad side track, . . . . . . . . . 840 76 

Miscellaneous, including laying of suction and delivery pipes, 

grading grounds and other work, ...... 3,110 31 

$60,408 31 
Extension of Mains. 

The 16-inch high-service main in Massachusetts Avenue in Arling- 
ton has been extended from Brattle Street to Bobbins Boad, a dis- 
tance of 421 feet, and connected with the 6-inch pipe in Bobbins 
Boad, -at a cost of $1,202.49. A 6-inch Venturi meter has been 
installed at Beachmont Square in Bevere, at a cost, including the 
meter register, insulated chamber and necessary connections, of 
$996.33. 

Engineering. 

Preliminary plans and estimates have been made for a 60-inch 
pipe line from the present terminus of the 60-inch line leading from 
the Weston Aqueduct, near the Charles Biver, through the city of 
Newton and a portion of the Brighton district to Beacon Street, 
near Chestnut Hill Beservoir. 

Surveys, plans and estimates have been made for improving the 
channel of the Stillwater Biver for about 1.4 miles, and for drain- 
ing about 200 acres of adjacent swamp land in the town of Sterling. 

Becord plans have been made showing the property owned by the 



94 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Commonwealth in connection with the Wachusett Reservoir and 
Aqueduct, of the Crane swamp property in Westborough with the 
location of swamp ditches, of swamps Nos. 54, 55 and 56 in Holden 
and Princeton showing the location of ditches, of the Wachusett 
Dam, of masonry highway bridges over the Stillwater and Quine- 
poxet rivers at Oakdale, and of the Sterling filter-beds. 

Investigations and estimates have been made for additional pipe 
lines in West Roxbury, Hyde Park, Winthrop, Everett, Chelsea 
and Revere. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Rainfall and Yield. 

The rainfall for the year on all of the watersheds has been very 
much below the average. On the Sudbury watershed it was 36.15 
inches, or 9.55 inches below the average for thirty-four years, and, 
with the exception of the year 1883, the lowest during the whole 
period. On the Wachusett watershed the total rainfall for the year 
was 37.83 inches, or 10.23 inches below the average of the past 
twelve years. During the first five months of the year the yield 
of the Wachusett watershed was but little below the average, but 
for the last seven months the yield was 25 per cent, less than for 
the same period during any one of the past twelve years, and the yield 
for the year was 29 per cent, less than the average for that period. 

Statistics relating to rainfall and yield of watersheds may be 
found in Appendix No. 2, tables 1 to 11. 

Storage Reservoirs. 
The quantity of water stored in all of the storage reservoirs on 
January 1, 1908, was 65,856,900,000 gallons. During the first 
eighteen days of the month of January there was a gain of 4,206,- 
000,000 gallons in the quantity stored. From January 18 to Febru- 
ary 10 there was very little gain in storage, but between the latter 
date and March 30 there was a gain of 8,115,000,000 gallons. All 
of the storage reservoirs were practically full from May 15 until 
June 1. On account of the low rainfall during the last seven 
months of the year there was an almost continual loss of storage 
from June 1 to January 1, 1909, amounting to 21,547,000,000 
gallons. The quantity stored on January 1, 1909, was 6,966,- 
600,000 gallons less than at the beginning of the year. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



95 



The following table gives the quantity of water stored in the 
storage reservoirs at the beginning of each month : — 



Quantity of Water stored 
and Cochituate 



in Wachusett Reservoir, and in Reservoirs on Sudbury 
Watersheds, at the Beginning of Each Month. 



Date. 


In 

"Wachusett 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


In Sudbury 

Reservoir and 

Framingham 

Reservoir No. 3 

(Gallons). 


In All Other 

Storage 
Reservoirs 
(Gallons). 


Total 
(Gallons) . 


January 1, 


1908 


• 






51,267,000,000 


7,944,700,000 


6,645,200,000 


65,856,900,000 


February 1, 










56,378,100,000 


7,114,600,000 


6,970,300,000 


70,463,000,000 


March 1, . 










59,337,400,000 


7,434,200,000 


6,726,100,000 


73,497,700,000 


April 1, . 










63,345,400,000 


8,090,600,000 


6,835,900,000 


78,271,900,000 


May 1, 










64,040,600,000 


8,044,700,000 


6,910,800,000 


78,996,100,000 


June 1, •. 










65,197,200,000 


8,115,200,000 


7,124,900,000 


80,437,300,000 


July 1, 










62,852,500,000 


7,881,000,000 


6,869,600,000 


77,603,100,000 


'August 1, 










59,428,600,000 


7,963,500,000 


6,600,000,000 


73,992,100,000 


September 1, 










57,092,800,000 


7,924,800,000 


6,557,500,000 


71,575,100,000 


October 1, 










53,360,500,000 


7,973,100,000 


6,419,900,000 


67,753,500,000 


November 1, 










51,018,300.000 


6,989,800,000 


6,485,600,000 


64,493,700,000 


December 1, 










50,298,800,000 


4,820,700,000 


6,132,100,000 


61,251,600,000 


] 
January 1, 


1909 


• 






46,176,000,000 


6,495,300,000 


6,219,000,000 


58,890,300,000 



Wachusett Reservoir and Dam. — At the beginning of the year 
the water in this reservoir was at elevation 384.31 and the res- 
ervoir contained 51,267,000,000 gallons. There was a continu- 
ous rise in the elevation of the surface of the reservoir until March 28, 
at which time the water stood at elevation 393.83, or 1.17 feet below 
the normal full-reservoir level. It was held at this elevation until 
the first of May, when it was allowed to rise and reached elevation 
395 on May 10. The highest elevation of the reservoir was 395.31, 
at 11 p.m. on May 30. After the latter date and up to the close of 
the year there was an almost continual fall in the elevation of the 
water in the reservoir, and on January 1, 1909, it stood at eleva- 
tion 379.87 and contained 46,176,000,000 gallons, showing a net 
loss for the entire year of 5,091,000,000 gallons. 

Water was wasted over the waste-weir on sixteen davs be- 
tween March 28 and June 2, the total quantity wasted being 1,705,- 
900,000 gallons. The maximum rate of flow over the waste-weir 



96 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

was on May 31, when for several hours it reached a rate of 688,- 
800,000 gallons per twenty-four hours. 

The average daily quantity supplied to the Lancaster Mills during 
the year was 2,767,000 gallons. 

The work of repairing and reinforcing the North Dike was 
nearly finished in 1907, and was fully described in the report for 
that year. The Hugh Nawn Contracting Company placed about 
600 cubic yards of riprap on the slope of the dike between January 
1 and 14, completing its contract. As soon as the weather per- 
mitted the final grading and seeding of the repaired portion of the 
dike were done by the day-labor force. The total cost of repairing 
the damage done by the slide, together with the cost of reinforcing 
the dike, was $57,950.82. 

For the purpose of observing the elevation of the ground water 
in the different portions of the dike, four additional pipe wells 2 
inches in diameter have been driven through the filled portion of 
the dike into the underlying sand, and for the purpose of obtaining 
a measurement of the quantity percolating through the dike a cul- 
vert through the embankment dividing Coachlace Pond has been 
lowered and measuring weirs have been established. 

About 29.4 acres of land on the back slopes of the North Dike 
have been plowed and sowed with grass seed, and 10 acres of grass 
land on the South Dike have been top-dressed with sludge from the 
settling tanks at the Clinton sewerage filter-beds. 

The final clearing of the reservoir bottom above elevation 385, 
done in 1907, was of necessity not as thoroughly done as that below 
this elevation, on account of the rapidly rising waters of the reser- 
voir and the setting in of freezing weather. Over the greater part 
of the area between elevations 385 and 398 the ground has been 
gone over during the past year, the weeds, bushes and roots pulled 
and the refuse either burned or carted outside the limits of the reser- 
voir. There were cleaned in this manner a total of 333 acres, at a 
cost of $2,221.14. 

The shore at the easterly end of the reservoir, beginning at a 
point 500 feet south of the Wachusett Dam, and extending for a 
distance of 1,250 feet, was orisinallv covered with cobble stones for 
a width of about 20 feet and to a depth of about 9 inches. When 
the reservoir was full this protection proved insufficient, and it has 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 97 

been reinforced with riprap about 3 feet in thickness at the high- 
water line. This work cost $802.87. 

At three points where highway embankments form the shore line 
the wave action caused the original ground to cave away at the ends 
of the slope paving and it has been necessary to protect the em- 
bankments with riprap at these points. 

Through the upper end of the reservoir at Oakdale the Worcester, 
Nashua & Portland Division of the Boston & Maine Railroad passes 
for about 4,800 feet on an embankment having a maximum height 
of about 23 feet, with the finished grade about 5 feet above full 
reservoir level. The embankment gradually settled as the water rose 
in the reservoir, the maximum settlement amounting to about 6 
inches. The work of restoring this embankment and tracks to grade 
has been done by employes of the Boston & Maine Railroad, the ex- 
pense to be borne by the Commonwealth. 

There have been placed in the reservoir 21 spar buoys, to mark 
dangerous shoals and points. 

The grass from 398 acres of land in Clinton, Sterling, Boylston, 
West Boylston and Holden has been sold at auction for $2,442.75. 

It has been the custom each year to mow the weeds and brush on 
the 50-foot margin along the shore of the reservoir and on the 40- 
foot marginal fire guard, but, owing to the fact that the growth has 
become very light, it was decided to alternate between the reservoir 
margin and the fire guard, and during the past season the reservoir 
margin has not been cut. 

Fences, aggregating 3,910 feet in length, have been built between 
property of the Commonwealth and land of Eelix Nugent in Clin- 
ton and of H. P. Newton in Sterling and West Boylston, the adjoin- 
ing owners in each case building one-half of the fence. 

At the Wachusett Dam the maintenance work, consisting of the 
operation of the valves controlling the flow of water, cleaning the 
screens, taking care of the gate-chambers and of the grounds about 
the dam, has been in charge of one keeper, assisted regularly by 
two gate-keepers and one night watchman, and, when necessary, by 
one or two additional laborers. 

The hydraulic gates in the lower gate-chamber, heretofore oper- 
ated by water from the town of Clinton, have been connected so as 
to be operated by the supply from the reservoir. 



98 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The standards placed on the waste-weir in 1905 to support the 
stop-planks and the foot bridge were made of cast iron, the up- 
stream portions of the standards being hollow and filled with Port- 
land cement grout. During the first winter after they were set 
nearly all of the standards on the low-level portion of the waste- 
weir and a few of the smaller ones on the higher level became 
broken or cracked, due either to shrinkage strains in the metal or 
to the freezing of water in the hollow part of the castings. All of 
the standards on the low-level portion, nine in number, have been 
replaced with new standards made of 1-inch mild steel plate rein- 
forced by 4-inch X 4-inch X %-inch and 4-inch X 3-inch X %-inch 
angle irons forming grooves for the stop-planks, together with other 
stiffening plates and connecting angles. The new standards were 
made by the New England Structural Company of Boston, at a cost 
of $893.53, while the cost of dismantling a section of the waste-weir 
bridge, demolishing the old and setting the new standards, less the 
amount received for the material in the old standards, was $289.97, 
making the total cost of repairs $1,183.50. 

The water which fiowed over the waste-weir and down the waste- 
channel in the spring loosened' from the bottom of the channel and 
carried down into the Lancaster Mills Pond about 680 cubic yards 
of stone, which had been shattered by blasting and the action of 
the frost. The stone accumulated in the pond thus far does no injury, 
but if the action continues in the future, as seems probable, it may be 
necessary to remove some of the stone from the pond. 

The heavy wave action upon the paving on the reservoir side of the 
waste-weir and at the southerly end of the dam removed the small 
stones which had been placed in the joints of the paving. The 
joints on an area of about 263 square yards have been treated by 
filling the joints to within about 3 inches of the top of the paving 
with fine gravel and sand packed hard, and covering this to the 
face of the paving with Portland cement mortar into which were 
driven small granite spalls. . 

About 1,500 mountain laurel plants have been transplanted from 
the woods near the Lamson place to the grounds below the dam. 

A boat landing; 51 feet long bv 3 feet wide has been built on a 
ledge outcrop near the westerly end of the waste-weir. 

The fourteen dwelling houses and other connected structures at 
the reservoir and at the Clinton filter-beds have received necessary 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 99 

repairs, including painting the exterior of the Lamson house and 
barn and the Cutting house, painting, papering and whitewashing 
the south tenement of the Lamson house, shingling the roofs of the 
Lamson, Sonia, Fuller and Moisen houses, and building a cesspool at 
the A. McLean house. 

Wachusett Watershed. — In addition to the work described under 
the head of " Construction," in connection with the improvement of 
the Wachusett watershed, all apple trees on the land of the Com- 
monwealth along the Quinepoxet and Stillwater rivers have been 
cut down and worked into shuttle and cord wood. There were se- 
cured 11,500 feet, B.M., of shuttle wood, which was sold for $550.52. 

Sudbury Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water 
in this reservoir was at elevation 259.65, or 0.65 of a foot above the 
stone crest of the overflow. Erom the middle of January to the 
middle of February water was kept from 1 to 1% feet below the crest 
in order to provide storage in case of large yields from the water- 
shed, but from the middle of March to October 23 the water was 
permitted to flow over the stone crest into Eramingham Reser- 
voir No. 3, the amount flowing being controlled by adjustment of 
the flashboards on the dam and by regulation of the quantity enter- 
ing the reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct. After October 
23 the reservoir was drawn down to facilitate work on the South- 
borough swimming pool, until it reached 8.16 feet below the crest 
of the dam, on December 5, after which date the flow in the Wachu- 
sett Aqueduct was increased for the purpose of filling the reservoir, 
and at the end of the year the water stood 3.23 feet below the crest 
of the dam. 

At the gate-house of the dam two steel protection plates were 
placed in one of the outlet pipes to take the place of plates which 
had been torn off by the action of the water. Three new cast-iron 
plates have been placed in the gate-house floor, to replace others 
which had been broken. Twelve new flashboards have been made 
to replace others destroyed by the action of the ice and waves. 

The iron and wood work in the gate-chamber, with the exception 
of the floor plates, the iron and wood work in the meter-chamber 
below the dam, and the manhole covers and iron fences near the 
dam have been painted. 

By the construction of an earth dam across an arm of the reser- 
voir a swimming pool, 400 feet long, with a maximum width of 60 



100 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

feet and from 2% to 6% feet in depth, has been constructed, for 
the use of the inhabitants of Southborough, on land belonging to 
the Commonwealth east of Maple Street, near the Framingham- 
Southborough Road. Water can be admitted to the pool from the 
reservoir and the waste water is carried by a 6-inch Akron pipe 
line 1,457 feet to a sand filter-bed, 50 feet by 30 feet by 3 feet 
deep, through which it passes before entering the brook leading to 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3. The town of Southborough pur- 
chased and now owns the land on which the filter-bed is located, 
and also paid for all pipes, cement and other materials used in 
building the pool and filter-bed. 

The 14 acres of filter-beds which are used for filtering the water 
of Marlborough Brook were cleaned in June, also the reservoir in 
which the brook water is received before passing on to the filter- 
beds. A large amount of silt and mud was removed from this 
reservoir and used in grading a portion of the adjacent ground on 
the east side of the reservoir. In the fall quite a number of cracks 
in the concrete aprons and dams connected with the channels and 
filter-beds were cut out and repointed, the office and shed were 
painted and brush growing around the beds was cut and burned. 
There was no overflow from the beds into the Sudbury Reservoir 
during the year. 

During six days in January and four days in February and 
March there was a small flow of diluted sewage into the filter-bed 
near Farm Road, which receives the overflow from the Marlborough 
main sewer during freshets, and there was a flow of ground water 
into the bed at times during the first five months of the year. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3. — The elevation of the water in 
this reservoir is controlled by drafts from the Sudbury Reservoir. 
Water was allowed to waste into Framingham Reservoir No. 1 for a 
portion of the time during March, April and May, and during the 
remainder of the year was kept on an average about 1 foot below the 
stone crest of the dam. Three screens, made of No. 18 copper wire 
with 1-inch mesh, have been made and placed in the entrance cham- 
bers of the gate-house, for the purpose of preventing the entrance of 
leaves and coarse floating matter. Wooden shutters have also been, 
made, to be placed in the entrance openings from the reservoir into 
the gate-house, to prevent the entrance of cold air when the water in 
the reservoir is below the top of the openings. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 101 

Framingham Reservoir No. 2. — No water was drawn from this 
reservoir for use in the Metropolitan District during the year, and 
the reservoir was full or overflowing for the entire year. Three 
screens were placed in the gate-house, similar to those described in 
connection with Framingham Reservoir No. 3. 

Framingham Reservoir No. 1. — This reservoir was substantially 
full throughout the year. There was a continuous waste over the 
stone crest of the dam from the beginning of the year to May 24, 
and for a large part of the time during November and December. 
From May 23 to June 11 the water was lowered about 2% feet in 
order to facilitate the work of the Boston & Worcester Street Rail- 
way Company in laying paving on the reservoir slope in connection 
with the widening of Worcester Street. In connection with this 
work the abutments of the bridge crossing the reservoir just below 
Eramingham Dam No. 3 have been extended and the bridge rebuilt, 
The paving on the northerly side of the road has been finished, but 
on the southerly side considerable filling and the placing of the pav- 
ing remained to be done at the close of the year. The paving of 
the river channel below the dam having been undermined by the 
current, repairs have been made by widening the channel and lay- 
ing new paving, grouted with Portland cement concrete. About 780 
square feet of paving were laid in doing this work. 

A wooden flume, 20 feet wide and 28 feet long, in the temporary 
dam on the Sudbury River, below Framingham Dam No. 1, has been 
repaired. 

Ashland Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the surface 
of the water in this reservoir was 3.75 feet below the stone crest of 
the overflow, but on January 14 it reached the elevation of the 
crest of the overflow and the reservoir remained practically full 
throughout the year. No water was drawn from the reservoir for 
the supply of the Metropolitan District. The outside of the attend- 
ant's house has been painted. 

Hopkinton Reservoir. — At the beginning of the year the water 
in this reservoir was at elevation 300.66, or 3.34 feet below the 
stone crest, but on January 13 it had risen to the elevation of the 
crest of the overflow, and the reservoir remained full throughout 
the year. No water was drawn from the reservoir for the supply 
of the Metropolitan District. The joints under the coping stones 
of the waste-way were repointed for a distance of 178 feet, nearly 



102 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

all of which was on the west side of the channel. The filter-beds 
below the dam were cleaned once during the year. 

Whitehall Reservoir. — On January 1 the surface of the water 
in this reservoir was only 0.28 of a foot below high-water mark, 
and water was allowed to waste until April 7, when the reservoir 
was 2.29 feet below high water. On account of the small rainfall 
during the remainder of the year the reservoir did not reach high- 
water mark. There was no water drawn from the reservoir for 
the supply of the Metropolitan District. 

Nine cottages were built during the year, making 36 cottages 
now located near the reservoir. There were in use during the sea- 
son on the reservoir 13 motor boats, 3 sail boats, 55 row boats 
and 16 canoes, making 87 boats of different kinds. 

The dam known as the middle dam, situated about 750 feet below 
the main dam, has been repaired by strengthening the retaining 
wall and by rebuilding the waste-way, 7.7 feet long and 14.1 feet 
wide, with chestnut lumber. 

Farm Pond. — No water was drawn into this pond from the 
reservoirs on the Sudbury River, and no water was drawn from 
the pond for the use of the District. The town of Framingham 
has drawn a portion of its supply from the filter gallery alongside 
the pond, and during each month of the year, with the exception of the 
months of May and June, has drawn some water directly from the 
Sudbury Aqueduct. 

Lake Cochituate. — The water in the lake at the beginning of 
the year was only 0.09 of a foot below high water, and the lake 
remained full until the middle of June. A draft for the supply 
of the District from the middle of June until the latter part of 
July lowered the lake about 2 feet, where it remained until Novem- 
ber 14, when it was again drawn upon, lowering its surface about 
1 foot. At the end of the year the water stood at elevation 141.78, 



or 2.58 feet below high water. Four new screens have been placed 
in the effluent gate-house for use in screening the water entering 
the aqueduct. 

The exterior of the house occupied by the foreman has been 
painted. 

Six hundred feet of trussed wire and 1,010 feet of galvanized 
ribbon wire fence have been built along Lake Avenue, and 2,500 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 103 

feet of 4-strand, galvanized, duplex twisted wire fence have been 
built on the line between land of the Commonwealth and Edward 
Hammond on the east side of the lake. 

The work of replacing small land bounds and setting bounds in 
places where none existed, to define the property of the Common- 
wealth around the lake, which was begun in 1907, has been com- 
pleted by the setting of 274 bounds. 

The work of registering boats and patrolling the lake to see that 
the rules of the Board were obeyed has been continued. One hun- 
dred and fifty-two boats were registered, and the registrations of 
4 boats were revoked for disobedience of the rules. Eight new 
cottages were built, 1 burued and 2 joined together, and the num- 
ber located around the lake at the end of the year was 65. 

No water was drawn from Dudley Pond during the year. The 
elevation of the pond has ranged between 1.14 and 3.77 feet below 
high water. One new cottage was built during the year, making 
19 now located on the shore of the pond. 

The surface of Dug Pond has ranged between 0.92 of a foot above 
and 3.43 feet below the invert of the 18-inch overflow pipe. Water 
was wasted through the overflow pipe into the lake at times during 
each of the first six months of the year. 

Water was pumped upon the Pegan filter-beds on 179 days during 
the year. The total quantity pumped was 265,725,000 gallons, 
equivalent to a daily average of 726,000 gallons. Of the total, 
173,446,000 gallons were from Pegan Brook and 92,279,000 gal- 
lons from the intercepting ditch which collects water from the 
brooks formerly draining into Pegan Brook Meadow. The total 
quantity of coal consumed was 160,412 pounds, so that 1,657 gal- 
lons of water were pumped per pound of coal. The cost of oper- 
ating the pumping station, cleaning the filter-beds and caring for 
the grounds was $2,740.08, making the cost per million gallons 
treated $10.31. The channel in the bottom of the Pegan Brook 
receiving reservoir was lowered and paved near the entrance of the 
pipes leading to the suction wells. The filter-beds were cleaned sev- 
eral times, and the ditches in the upper part of the Pegan Brook 
receiving reservoir were cleaned once during the year. Both the 
exterior and interior of the pumping station have been painted. 

Iron stop-plank grooves have been placed at the upper side of 



104 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

the culvert under Kansas Street, in which stop-planks can be placed 
to hold back, in time of freshets, a considerable quantity of water 
which now flows directly into the intercepting ditch, at times in 
larger quantities than can be cared for by the pumps. 

Sources from which Water has been taken. 
An average of 107,502,000 gallons per day was drawn from the 
Wachusett Reservoir through the Wachusett Aqueduct into the Sud- 
bury Reservoir. An average of 29,965,000 gallons per day was 
drawn from the Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct 
into the distribution system of the Metropolitan District. From 
Framingham Reservoir No. 3 an average of 94,256,000 gallons per 
day was drawn through the Sudbury Aqueduct, and from Lake Co- 
chituate an average of 4,027,000 gallons per day was drawn through 
the Cochituate Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. The Spot 
Pond drainage area furnished 82,570 gallons per day. No water 
was drawn from the Ashland, Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs 
nor from Framingham Reservoir No. 2 during the. year, except a 
small quantity used in cleaning the Sudbury Aqueduct. 

Aqueducts. 

The Wachusett Aqueduct has been in use on the whole or a por- 
tion of 310 days during the year. It was cleaned between Novem- 
ber 20 and 25. The usual work of cutting brush and weeds, clean- 
ing out culverts and farm ditches and general repairs along the 
aqueduct and open channel has been done. 

The Sudbury Aqueduct was in use on 360 days of the year for 
conveying water from Framingham Reservoir No. 3 to Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir, the only interruptions to the now having been from 
11 p.m. on November 16 to 4.30 p.m. on November 20, and from 
9 p.m. on November 30 to 3 p.m. on December 4, while the aque- 
duct was being cleaned. 

Extensive repairs have been made to the brick masonry walls of 
the Waban Bridge, which had become disintegrated by the action 
of frost and from other causes during the thirty years since the 
bridge was constructed. In doing this work it was found necessary 
not only to repoint the joints but in some cases to rebuild the ma- 
sonry. Work was commenced on July 30 and finished on Novem- 
ber 25, at a cost of $2,940. The aqueduct embankment between 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 105 

the Waban Bridge and Dover Street, for a distance of 1,300 feet, 
has been covered with loam to a depth of from 1 to 3 inches, and 
fertilized and reseeded. 

The aqueduct land, for a distance of 460 feet westerly from Wal- 
nut Street in Newton, which has been used in past years as a dump 
for debris of various kinds, has been graded so as to present a neat 
appearance, and fences have been built on the property lines for a 
length of 1,176 feet. A 4-strand ribbon wire fence was built on 
the property lines on both sides of the aqueduct for a distance of 
524 feet west and 783 feet east of Speen Street, making, including 
cross fences and passageways for cattle, a total length of 3,000 
feet. Manhole covers along the line and the iron floor in the east 
siphon chamber were painted, also the exterior trimmings of the 
store-house at South Eramingham and the interior finish and walls 
of the office of the sanitary inspectors. Considerable work has been 
done in removing brush and small trees* for the entire length of the 
aqueduct. 

The Cochituate Aqueduct was in use 108 days. It was cleaned 
from Lake Cochituate to the Chestnut Hill pumping station be- 
tween December 10 and 26. Considerable fresh-water sponge was 
found at various points, especially along the bottom of the aqueduct. 
New tongued and grooved kyanized spruce stop-planks have been 
put in position on the overflows from the aqueduct at three waste- 
weirs, to take the place of others which were decayed. Manhole 
covers along the line, the ironwork in the three waste-weirs, in the 
ventilator and in the roof of Dedman's waste-weir were painted. 

A 4-strand, duplex twisted wire fence, 625 feet long, was built 
on the property line north of the aqueduct and easterly of Snake 
Brook channel, to take the place of the stone wall which was 
used for paving a drainage ditch; and a fence 314 feet long was 
built on the property line at the foot of the south slope of the high 
embankment at Cedar Street, Wellesley. The bottom of the south 
slope of the aqueduct at Morse's Pond was roughly paved for a 
width of 9 feet and for a distance of 210 feet for the purpose of 
protecting the embankment, which in places was being undermined 
by the waves when the pond was high in the spring. Eorty land 
bounds have been placed along Morse's Pond and 4 near the Charles 
River, at points where the ground was covered with water when 
the bounds were being set during the previous year. Land bounds 



106 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

are now in position at every angle point along the Cochituate Aque- 
duct. 

The Weston Aqueduct was in service 366 days and was not cleaned 
during the year. The slopes of the embankment over the siphon 
pipes at Happy Hollow, between the road to Wayland and siphon 
chamber JSTo. 4, have been repaired by the application of 136 double- 
team loads of loam and 1 ton of fertilizer, and have been reseeded. 
Some of the joints in the masonry of gaging chamber ~No. 1 and in 
5 of the culverts between Millwood Street and Nobscot have been 
repointed. 

Pumping Stations. 

Seventy-six per cent, of the water supplied to the Metropolitan 
District has been pumped at the two stations at Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir ; the remainder was delivered by gravity. The total quan- 
tity pumped at all of the stations during the year was 39,156,- 
620,000 gallons, which was 2.5 per cent, more than during the 
preceding year. The cost of operating the stations was $119,201.12, 
equivalent to $3,044 per million gallons pumped, or $0,107 more 
than the corresponding cost during the year 1907. There was an 
increase in the cost of labor amounting to $4,144.88, due to the 
effect of a general increase of salaries in 1907, which affected but 
nine months of that year, and to the employment of additional help 
at the Chestnut Hill high-service and Arlington stations. 

The cost per gross ton of fuel used at the Chestnut Hill high- 
service station was $0,135 more, and at the Chestnut Hill low- 
service station $0.01 more, while at the Spot Pond station it was 
$0.07 less than during the preceding year. The average cost at all 
the stations of raising 1,000,000 gallons of water 1 foot high was 
$0.0351, — an increase of nearly 7 per cent, as compared with the 
previous year. 

The coal purchased for use at the several pumping stations has 
been tested to determine the number of British thermal units and 
the percentage of volatile matter and ash which it contained, and 
the cylinder and engine oils have been tested to determine their 
viscosity, specific gravity and burning point. One hundred and 
thirty-four samples of coal and 32 samples of oil were tested. 

Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as fol- 
lows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



107 





Gross Tons. 


Price 
per Gross 

Ton, 
in Bins. 1 




Chestnut 
Hill High- 
service 
Station. 


Chestnut 
Hill Low- 
service 
Station. 


Spot 

Pond 

Station. 


West 
Roxbury 
Station. 


Arling- 
ton 
Station. 


Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 


- 


1,054.82 


- 


- 


- 


$4 34 


Spring Coal Company, bituminous, 


1,911.60 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 18 


E. B. Townsend, bituminous, . 


2,734.54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


4 10 


E. B. Townsend, bituminous, . 


- 


1,325.63 


- 


- 


- 


4 03 


Anderson Coal Mining Company, bitu- 
minous. 
New River Coal Company, bituminous, . 


43.62 
109.11 


— 


_ 


— 


_ 


3 97 
3 93 


E. B. Townsend, buckwheat anthracite, 


23.10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 90 


C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthra- 
cite. 

C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthra- 
cite. 

Locke Coal Company, bituminous, . 


1,818.75 


1,117.35 


306.23 


- 


- 


2 80 
2 70 
5 00 


Davis Coal and Coke Company, bitumi- 
nous. 
Locke Coal Company, screenings, . 


_ 


_ 


699.03 
602.93 


_ 


_ 


4 14 
2 24 


D. J. Cutter & Co., egg, .... 


- 


- 


- 


139.44 


- 


7 28 


J. A. Whittemore's Sons, egg, . 


- 


- 


- 


243.55 


- 


6 83 


Wm. A. Jepson, bituminous, . 


- 


- 


- 


- 


141.83 


4 41 


Davis Coal and Coke Company, bitumi- 
nous. 

C. W. Claflin & Co., buckwheat anthra- 
cite. 

Philadelphia and Reading Coal and Iron 
Company, screenings. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


210.24 

29.75 

163.50 


4 05 
3 01 
2 67 


Total gross tons, bituminous, . 


4,798.87 


2,380.45 


1,005.26 


- 


352.07 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite, 


1,841.852 


1,117.352 


- 


382.99 


29.752 


- 


Total gross tons, anthracite screen- 


- 


- 


602.93 


- 


163.50 


- 


ings. 
Average price per gross ton, bituminous, 


$4 130 


$4 17 


$4 40 


- 


$4 19 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite, 


2 8052 


2 702 


- 


$7 00 


3 012 


- 


Average price per gross ton, anthracite 
screenings. 


- 


- 


2 24 


- 


2 67 


- 



i Includes cost of unloading coal from cars and all expenses incidental to storage of the coal. 
2 Buckwheat. 

The contracts under which bituminous coal has been purchased 
during the past year have specified that the coal furnished should 
contain approximately 14,200 British thermal units, 18 to 20 per 
cent, volatile matter, 8 per cent, ash and 1 per cent, sulphur. Coal 
which when dry contains more than 14 per cent, ash, 23 per cent, 
volatile matter or 1.75 per cent, sulphur is subject to rejection. 

Payments for the coal have been made on the basis of a price 
bid, corrected for variation in the heating value and percentage of 
ash as determined by samples of the coal delivered, an addition be- 



108 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



ing made in cases when the number of British thermal units exceeds 
14,200 and a deduction when the number falls below 14,000, or 
the amount of the ash exceeds 9 per cent. The average results of 
the tests of bituminous coals are given in the following table, includ- 
ing coal purchased for both the Water and Sewerage Works : — 



Kind of Coal. 



Number 

of Samples 

tested. 



British 

Thermal 

Units. 



Percentage of 
Volatile 
Matter. 



Percentage of 
Ash. 



Barnet, 
Carbon, 
Vulcan, 
Davis, 
Georges Creek, 



60 
3 

39 

81 

5 



13,931 
14,088 
14,443 
14,172 
14,039 



15.67 
17.03 
20.14 
21.43 

18.67 



9.97 
8.84 
7.04 
7.94 
8.64 



Chestnut Hill High-service Station. 

At this station water is pumped for use in the high-service dis- 
trict of Boston, the city of Quincy and the towns of Watertown, 
Belmont and Milton. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), . . . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 
Average lift (feet), 



Cost of pumping : — 
Labor, 

Fuel 

Repairs, 

Oil, waste and packing, 
Small supplies, . 
Totals, 



Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



Engines 
Nos. 1 and 2, 



2,814.61 

7,690,000 

4,935,229 

570.31 

121.62 

$7,581 65 

8,592 28 

2,217 46 

324 12 

182 73 



$18,898 24 

$6,714 
.055 



Engine 

No. 3. 



3S1.93 
1,044,000 
409,193 
933.37 
132.94 

$478 12 

718 16 

58 34 

20 44 

11 52 



$1,286 58 

$3,369 
.025 



Engine 

No. 4. 



10,560.93 

28,855,000 

8,895,838 

1,187.18 

131.09 

$14,707 95 

15,388 20 

2,193 50 

628 78 

354 49 



$33,272 92 

$3,151 
.024 



Totals for 
Station. 



13,757.47 

37,589,000 

14,240,260 

966.10 

129.20 

$22,767 72 

24,698 64 

4,469 30 

973 34 

548 74 



$53,457 74 

$3.8S6 
.030 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



109 



The daily average quantity pumped was 1,155,000 gallons in 
excess of the corresponding amount for the previous year. 

The fuel economizer at this station has been thoroughly cleaned 
and repaired, the pump valves of the No. 4 engine overhauled and 
refaced, 6 new tubes placed in the feed-water heater, the smoke flue 
leading from the economizer to the chimney rebuilt, and No. 12 
boiler repaired by replacing rings around the fire doors. The chim- 
ney at this station has been repointed and the lightning rods re- 
paired. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Pumping Station. 

The quantity of water pumped at this station was 3.1 per cent, 
more than during the preceding year. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 
Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 
Total coal used (pounds), . 
Gallons pumped per pound of coal, . 
Average lift (feet), .... 



Engines 
Nos. 5, 6 and 7. 

21,844.65 

59,685,000 

8,507,925 

2,567.56 

50.83 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $19,125 34 

Fuel, 14,279 34 

Repairs, 1,123 23 

Oil, waste and packing, . . . . . . . . 583 44 

Small supplies, 499 09 



Total for station, $35,610 44 



Cost per million gallons pumped, . 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



$1,630 
.032 



The cost per million gallons pumped to the reservoir was $0,039 
less than for the year 1907. The machinery in this station is now 
in good condition. 

Spot Pond Pumping Station. 

As in previous years, the greater part of the work done at this 
station was performed by the 20,000,000-gallon Holly engine, but 
the smaller Leavitt engine was used during the greater part of the 
month of December, while repairs were being made to the Holly 
engine. 



110 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 8 operated (hours), . 

Engine No. 9 operated (hours), . 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 8 (million gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 9 (million gallons), 



3,040.51 

8,307,000 

2,706,751 

1,123.31 

129.91 

301 

3,628 

131.08 

2,909.43 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $8,568 97 

Fuel, 4,774 85 

Repairs, 516 02 

Oil, waste and packing, ........ 267 36 

Small supplies, 289 55 



Total for station, $14,416 75 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot high, 



$4,742 
.036 



The daily average quantity pumped was 646,000 gallons less than 
during the previous year, — a reduction of 7.2 per cent. This 
was due to reduced consumption of water in Melrose, and in the 
high-service districts of Somerville, Medford, Chelsea, Maiden and 
Everett. The cost per million gallons pumped to the reservoir was 
$0,382 more than for the previous year. There was an increase of 
$0,127 in the cost of repairs, and of $0,196 in the cost of labor, 
the latter due to a reduction in the quantity pumped without a cor- 
responding reduction in the cost of labor, which was almost exactly 
the same during the two years. 

Three new valve stems have been made for the 10,000,000-gallon 
Leavitt engine. On the 20,000,000-gallon Holly engine a new joint 
was made between the bottom of the high-pressure cylinder and the 
cylinder head, four low-pressure valve operating levers refaced, and 
the boiler feed-pump plunger repaired and at the same time en- 
larged from 1% inches to 1% inches in diameter. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



Ill 



Arlington Pumping Station. 

At this station was pumped all the water supplied to the town 
of Lexington and to the high-service district of the town of Arling- 
ton. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 



Total quantity pumped (million gallons), 

Daily average quantity pumped (gallons), 

Total coal used (pounds), . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Average lift (feet), 

Engine No. 10 operated (hours), . 

Engine No. 11 operated (hours), . 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 10 (million gallons), 

Quantity pumped by Engine No. 11 (million gallons), 



279.89 

765,000 

1,162,513 

240.76 

286 

6,145 

1,397 

237.86 

42.03 



Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $5,728 53 

Fuel, 1,971 15 

Repairs, 776 74 

Oil, waste and packing, 175 62 

Small supplies, 493 47 



Total for station, $9,145 51 



Cost per million gallons pumped, 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, 



$32,675 
.114 



At the close of the year 1907 the new Allis-Chalmers engine was 
being operated in the new pumping station building, but the new 
Blake engine had not been delivered, and fires were being main- 
tained under the boilers at the old station so that the old pumps 
could be operated without delay in case of any accident to the new 
plant. On February 15 the new Blake pumping engine was ready 
for use and the work of dismantling the old station was commenced. 
The buildings were razed and the grounds graded and reseeded as 
soon as the weather was suitable. 

The daily average quantity pumped during the year shows an 
increase of 129,000 gallons, or 20.3 per cent., as compared with 
the previous year. This increase was almost entirely due to in- 
crease in the quantity used in the high-service district of Arlington. 



112 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

West Roxbury Pumping Station. 

At this station water was pumped for supplying the higher por- 
tions of West Roxbury and Milton. 

The following are the statistics relating to operations at this 
station : — 

Pumps operated 8,170 hours; average, 22 hours per day. 

Daily average quantity of water pumped (gallons), . . . 639,600 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), . . . 2,304 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 277.61 

Average lift (feet), 137 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, . ' $3,543 35 

Fuel, 2,639 15 

Repairs, 219 48 

Oil, waste and packing, 31 67 

Small supplies, . . 137 03 

Total for station, $6,570 68 

Cost per million gallons pumped, $28,068 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, .205 

The quantity pumped was 45,600 gallons per day more than dur- 
ing the previous year. 

In the report for the year 1907 it was stated that it had been 
necessary at times to operate both of the pumps to their full ca- 
pacity, and that it would be necessary to enlarge the plant unless 
a considerable reduction could be made in the consumption. No 
reduction has been made. On the contrary, the consumption has 
increased, and it will be necessary to add to the pumping facilities 
at this station during the present year. 

Consumption of Water. 
The daily average quantity of water consumed in the 18 munici- 
palities supplied from the Metropolitan Water Works during the 
year 1908, as measured by the Venturi meters, was 125,441,000 
gallons, equal to 133 gallons per inhabitant in the district supplied. 
In addition to the above, 61,620 gallons daily were supplied to the 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



113 



United States Government reservation on Peddock's Island. The 
daily average quantity supplied to the Metropolitan Water District, 
as determined by pump measurement and by the flow in the Weston 
Aqueduct and the estimated yield of Spot Pond, was 127,301,000 
gallons, equal to 134.7 gallons per inhabitant. The excess differ- 
ence of 1,860,000 gallons per day between the quantity delivered by 
the aqueducts and that measured by meters to the several munici- 
palities is due to differences in methods of measurement, to leakage 
from the Metropolitan Water Works reservoirs and pipes, and to 
the use of water at the Chestnut Hill and Spot Pond pumping 
stations. 

The daily average consumption of water in each of the cities and 
towns supplied from the Metropolitan Works during the years 1907 
and 1908, as measured by the Yenturi meters, was as follows: — 





Estimated 
Population 

1908. 




Daily Average 


Consumption 








1907. 


1908. 


Increase. 






Gallons. 


Gallons 
per Capita. 


Gallons. 


Gallons 
per Capita. 


Decrease. 


Boston, 


622,760 


96,422,800 


157 


98,379,300 


158 


1,956,500 


- 


Somerville, 


74,000 


6,548,400 


90 


6,589,200 


89 


40,800 


- 


Maiden, 


40,560 


1,867,600 


47 


1,868,600 


46 


1,000 


- 


Chelsea, 


31,820 


3,761,000 


97 


3,316,900 


104 


- 


444,100 


Everett, 


32,320 


2,555,000 


81 


2,636,300 


82 


81,300 


- 


Quincy, 


30,430 


2,996,900 


102 


3,003,600 


99 


6,700 


- 


Med ford, . 


21,290 


2,172,700 


105 


2,069,000 


97 


- 


103,700 


Melrose, 


15,110 


1,748,000 


118 


1,351,900 


89 


- 


396,100 


Revere, 


14,5801 


1,240,700 


88 


1,293,100 


89 


52,400 


- 


Watertown, 


12,270 


796,800 


67 


732,000 


60 


- 


64,800 


Arlington, . 


10,460 


939,800 


92 


971,200 


93 


31,400 


- 


Milton, 


7,560 


339,800 


46 


331,600 


44 


- 


8,200 


Winthrop, . 


7,840 


883,400 


117 


928,700 


118 


45,300 


- 


Stoneham, . 


6,630 


606,900 


93 


626,000 


94 


19,100 


- 


Belmont, 


4,690 


331,100 


73 


365,400 


78 


34,300 


- 


Lexington, 


4,630 


324,000 


73 


328,800 


71 


4,800 


- 


Nahant, 


1,860 


135,400 


73 


140,100 


75 


4,700 


- 


Swampscott, 


6,550 


475,300 


74 


509,300 


78 


34,000 


- 


District, 


945,360 


124,145,600 


133 


125,441,000 


133 


1,295,400 


- 



i Includes 280 people in Saugus. 



114 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The consumption in the several districts was as follows : — 



Gallons 
per Day. 



Increase 

(Gallons 

per Day). 



Southern low-service district, embracing the low-service district of Boston, 
with the exception of Charlestown and East Boston, .... 

Northern low-service district, embracing the low-service districts of Som- 
erville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Evex*ett, Arlington, Charlestown and 
East Boston 

Southern high service district, embracing the high-service districts of 
Boston, Quincy, Watertown, Belmont, and a portion of Milton, 

Northern high-service district, embracing Melrose, Revere, 1 Winthrop, 
Swampscott, Nahant and Stoneham, and the high-service districts of 
Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Medford, Everett and East Boston, . 

Southern extra high-service district, embracing the highest portions of 
West Roxuury and Milton, 

Northern extra high service district, embracing Lexington and the highest 
portions of Arlington, 

Totals 



51,313,600 

28,574,700 
35,804,100 

8,347,400 
639,600 
761,600 



340,500 

495,000 
854,600 

564,5002 

44,000 

125,800 



125,441,000 



1,295,400 



i Includes a small part of Saugus. 



2 Decrease. 



Considering the District as a whole, the consumption of water 
increased in the same proportion as the population, and the per 
capita consumption remained the same as for the preceding year. 
During the first three months of the year the daily average consump- 
tion of water was 5,413,000 gallons per day less, and during the 
following four months 8,234,700 gallons per day greater, than 
during the preceding year. These differences were due in great 
measure to much warmer weather during the winter, with a conse- 
quent reduction in the amount of water wasted to prevent freezing 
of service pipes, and to the very dry and hot weather during the 
summer. 

A comparison of the per capita consumption in the several munici- 
palities shows very clearly that in some cities and towns there is a 
large waste of water, although allowance must be made for differ- 
ences in conditions. In Boston the quantity used for business and 
manufacturing is larger than in any other municipality, and the 
traveling and suburban population from outside the city, which 
uses water but is not included in the census population, affects the 
per capita rate. Notwithstanding these conditions the measurement 
of the water used in different sections of the city of Boston shows 
that the quantity of water used in the residential districts is ex- 
cessively large. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



115 



The following table gives the population, total daily average and 
per capita consumption in gallons for the year 1908, in the differ- 
ent divisions into which the city of Boston is divided for con- 
venience of measurement : — 



District. 



Population. 



Daily Average 

Consumption 

(Gallons). 



Per Capita 

Con- 
sumption 
(Gallons). 



Southern low-service, 
Southern high-service, 
Charlestown, .... 

East Boston 

Brighton high-service, 
West Roxbury extra high-service, 
Breeds Island, .... 
Totals, 



352,900 

169,350 

39,990 

48,250 

7,830 

4,110 

330 



622,760 



51,313,600 
30,112,400 
7,749,100 
7,278,300 
1,299,100 
599,600 
27,200 



98,379,300 



146 
178 
194 
151 
166 
146 
82 



158 



The southern low-service district comprises the city proper with 
the exception, in general, of the area enclosed by Charles, Cam- 
bridge, Court, Washington and JBoylston streets; also nearly all of 
South Boston and the lower portions of Roxbury, Dorchester and 
Brighton. It includes the greater part of the business and manu- 
facturing section of the city, the railroads entering the South Sta- 
tion, and many of the large electric power and lighting plants that 
might be expected to show a very large per capita use of water. 
While the average of 146 gallons in this district is large, it is 
exceeded by the southern high-service district with 178 gallons, 
Charlestown with 194 gallons, East Boston with 151 gallons and 
the high-service district of Brighton with 166 gallons. All of these 
other districts are largely residential, although the southern high- 
service district includes several of the largest hotels and some busi- 
ness and manufacturing property and considerable quantities of 
water are used in Charlestown and East Boston by the railroads 
and shipping, and for manufacturing purposes. 

The reduction in the daily average use in Chelsea was due to the 
reduction in the number of water takers after the fire on April 12. 
There was a large waste of water in the burned district for a con- 
siderable time after the fire, and the per capita consumption is still 
very large. Both Medford and Melrose show a reduction in the 



116 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

quantity used, which is, without doubt, due to the more general 
use of water meters. In Melrose the reduction is especially notice- 
able. The introduction of meters was begun in this city in the latter 
part of 1907, and with the beginning of the year 1908 about 30 per 
cent, of the takers were changed from schedule to meter rates. The 
setting of meters was continued throughout the year, and other takers 
were changed from schedule to meter rates on July 1. At the end 
of the year practically all of the services were metered, and during 
the coming year all water takers will pay in proportion to the 
quantity of water used. The records for the past year show a daily 
saving of 396,100 gallons, or 29 gallons per capita, and during the 
last three months the per capita consumption averaged 49.3 gallons 
less than during the corresponding period in 1907, — a reduction 
of 43 per cent. A further reduction of from 10 to 15 gallons per 
capita will undoubtedly be made during the coming year. 

While it is generally true that 50 gallons per capita can be con- 
sidered a proper allowance for residential districts, the results in 
Belmont, where every service pipe is metered and the per capita 
use was 78 gallons, is an illustration of the fact that there may be 
good reasons for a greater use. The large per capita consumption in 
this town was due to the large quantity used at the McLean Insane 
Asylum and by market gardeners during the long-continued dry 
weather. 

The diagram facing this page shows graphically the average rate of 
consumption in the District supplied by the Metropolitan Works for 
each week during the years 1907 and 1908, also the rate of consump- 
tion between the hours of 1 and 4 a.m. and the average temperature of 
the air for the week. 

It. may be noted that the weeks ending February 8 and July 11, 
which were respectively the weeks showing the lowest and highest 
average temperatures during the year, were the weeks in which 
the consumption of water was the greatest for each season. 

Chapter 524 of the Acts of the year 1907 provides that on and 
after January 1, 1908, all cities and towns which derive their water 
from the Metropolitan Works shall equip all new service pipes with 
water meters, and shall also annually equip with meters 5 per cent, 
of the services which were unmetered on December 31, 1907. Al- 
though the city of Boston has taken no steps to comply with this 



Average Rate of Consumption 

IN 

Metropolitan Water District 

AND 
AVERAGE TEMPERATURE of AIR at CHESTNUT HILL RESERVOIR 

FOR 
EACH WEEK DURING 1908 

Jan Feb Mar Apr. May June July Aug. Sept Oct. Nov. Dec. 

4 II 18 25 I 8 15 2229 7 142126 4 II 16 25 2 9 16 2530 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 1 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 2431 7 14 21 28 5 IE 19 26 

80- i i i i i | | | | | 




4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 29 7 14 2128 4 II 18 25 2 9 16 23 30 6 13 20 27 4 II 18 25 I 8 15 22 29 5 12 19 26 3 10 17 2431 7 14 21 28 5 12 19 26 

Jan Feb. Mar ' Apr. May June July Aug. Sept. Oct. Nov. Dec. 

Average Rate of Consumption for each week, thus V/////A 

» '• .. between I and A A.M. for each week, thus B3%ffffl 

Averages in 19 07 shown in red. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



117 



law, the other cities and towns have fully complied with its pro- 
visions, with the exception of Revere, where the number of meters 
set was about half the number required. The number of meters 
added during the year in the whole District was 7,084, as compared 
with 4,334 during the year 1907. 

The following table gives the number of services in use on De- 
cember 31, 1908, the number of services added and the number of 
meters added on both new and old services during the year 1908. 
In some cases the number of services installed exceeds the number 
of meters on new services for the reason that the laying of the serv- 
ice pipes precedes the setting of the meters. 







Number of 
Service 

Pipes laid 
in 1908. 


Services 

in Use 

December 

31, 1908. 


Meters 


4.DDED DURING 1908. 


Meters in 

Use 
December 
31, 1908. 


Per Cent, of 
Services 
metered 

December 
31, 1908. 




New. 


Old. 


Total. 


Boston, . 




1,177 


94,960 


98 


84 


182 


5.372 


5.7 


Somerville, 




169 


11,817 


147 


732 


879 


4,325 


36.6 


Maiden, . 




116 


7,137 


58 


43 


101 


6,872 


96.3 


Chelsea, . 




106 


4,000 


87 


198 


285 


1,357 


33.9 


Everett, . 




78 


5,239 


50 


338 


388 


504 


9.6 


Quiney, . 




312 


6,403 


75 


358 


433 


1,913 


29.9 


Medford, 




132 


4,510 


97 


856 


953 


1,495 


33.1 


Melrose, . 




52 


3,481 


29 


2,432 


2,461 


3,481 


100.0 


Revere, . 




146 


3,073 


49 


85 


134 


297 " 


9.7 


Watertown, 




33 


1,919 


33 


- 


33 


1,919 


100.0 


Arlington, 




65 


1,979 


49 


108 


157 


992 


50.1 


Milton, . 




54 


1,339 


54 


- 


54 


1,339 


100.0 


Winthrop, 




• 104 


2,167 


104 


213 


317 


387 


17.8 


Stoneham, 




28 


1,359 


28 


116 


144 


174 


12.8 


Belmont, 




57 


835 


57 


- 


57 


835 


100.0 


Lexington, 




39 


741 


36 


113 


149 


245 


33.1 


Nahant, . 




10 


420 


10 


30 


40 


130 


31.0 


Swampscott, 




53 


1,355 


53 


264 


317 


1,209 


89.2 






2,731 


152,734 


1,114 


5,970 


7,084 


32,846 


21.5 



In the cities and towns outside of Boston 6,902 meters were added 
during the year, equivalent to 11.7 per cent, of the number of serv- 
ices in use on January 1, 1908, and at the end of the year meters 
had been set on 47.6 per cent, of the services. 



118 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Quality of the Water. 

The quality of the water supplied to the Metropolitan District 
has been exceptionally good throughout the year, due, largely, to 
the fact that a much larger proportion of the supply than ever before 
was drawn from the Wachusett Reservoir. About 83 per cent, of 
the water used was supplied from this reservoir, 14 per cent, from 
the Sudbury Reservoir and Framingham Reservoir No. 3, and 3 
per cent, from Lake Cochituate. In almost every respect the results 
of the examinations show that the water supplied has been better 
than for many years. The number of organisms increased some- 
what, but they were not of an objectionable character. 

Samples of the water have been collected monthly from 24 points 
and semimonthly from 5 points on the works, and sent to the State 
Board of Health for chemical analysis. Samples of water have also 
been collected weekly at 35 points and biweekly at 8 points, and 
examined microscopically and for color, odor, taste and turbidity 
in the biological laboratory of the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage 
Board. 

The following table gives a comparison of the average results of 
the examinations of water from a tap in Boston for the years 1901 
to 1908, inclusive: — 





1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1900. 


1907. 


1908. 


State Board of Health Examina- 


















tions. 


















Color (Nessler standard), . 


0.24 


0.26 


0.25 


0.23 1 


0.241 


0.24 1 


0.221 


0.191 


Total residue, .... 


4.43 


3.93 


3.98 


3.93 


3.86 


3.86 


3.83 


3.50 




1.64 


1.56 


1.50 


1.59 


1.59 


1.39 


1.40 


1.35 


Free ammonia 


0.0013 


0.0016 


0.0013 


0.0023 


0.0020 


0.0018 


0.0013 


0.0011 


A1 mSSi n ° ldain '( ^solved," : 


0.0158 


0.0139 


0.0125 


0.0139 


0.0145 


0.0159 


0.0129 


0.0115 


0-0143 


0.0119 


0.0110 


0.0121 


0.0124 


0.0134 


0.0109 


0.0092 


monia > • (suspended, . 


0.0015 


0.0020 


0.0015 


0.0018 


0.0021 


0.0025 


0.0020 


0.0024 


Chlorine, 


0.30 


0.29 


0.30 


0.34 


0.35 


0.34 


0.33 


0.33 


Nitrogen as nitrates, 


0.0173 


0.0092 


0.0142 


0.0110 


0.00S3 


0.0054 


0.0068 


0.0092 


Nitrogen as nitrites, 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


0.0001 


Oxygen consumed, 


0.42 


0.40 


0.39 


0.37 


0.35 


0.36 


0.32 


0.26 




1.7 


1.3 


1.5 


1.5 


1.4 


1.3 


lr3 


1.2 


Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 


















age Board Examinations. 


















Color (platinum standard), . 


34 


*33 


35 


32 


28 


25 


27 


22 


Turbidity, 


2.0 


2.3 


2.2 


2.4 


1.9 


2.2 


2.2 


2.4 


Total organisms, .... 


243 


367 


286 


303 


528 


550 


427 


695 


Amorphous matter, 


38 


34 


36 


36 


37 


42 


47 


64 


Bacteria, 


162 


164 


126 


176 


231 


154 


176 


148 



Note. — Chemical analyses are in parts per 100,000, organisms and amorphous matter in stand- 
ard units per cubic centimeter, and bacteria in number per cubic centimeter. The standard unit 
has an area of 400 square microns, and by its use the number of diatomaeeaj are decreased, and the 
number of chlorophyceas and eyanophycese are very much increased, as compared with the num- 
ber of organisms. 

i Platinum standard. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 119 

In the biological laboratory there have been made 2,459 micro- 
scopical and 1,215 bacterial examinations of water collected at 
various points upon the works. Of the microscopical examinations 
1,926 were of the regular weekly and biweekly samples and 533 
were special examinations. 

The bacteriological work consisted of routine weekly examina- 
tions, monthly examinations of the main feeders of the Sudbury 
Reservoir, of Eramingham Reservoir No. 3 and of Lake Cochituate, 
and monthly tests of the efficiency of the Pegan Brook, Marlborough 
Brook and Sterling filter-beds. 

The water of the Wachusett Reservoir has been free from ob- 
jectionable organisms, and the water at the bottom of the reservoir 
showed no indications of stagnation. The water in the Sudbury 
Reservoir and in Framingham Reservoir No. 3 was largely supplied 
from the Wachusett Reservoir, and has been of good quality. The 
number of organisms in the water has been larger than usual, but 
they were principally diatoms, and not of a character to cause 
disagreeable tastes and odors. A small growth of Uroglena was 
present in the Sudbury Reservoir in January, but it did not cause 
a noticeable taste in the water supplied to the District. The quality 
of the water was somewhat improved by aeration while passing over 
the overflow of the Sudbury Dam. 

In Lake Cochituate there was a large growth of microscopic or- 
ganisms, largely diatoms, and during the greater portion of the 
year there was a sufficient number of either Chlamydomonas, 
Aphanizomenon, Anabgena or Synura to give the water an objection- 
able taste and odor. 

The water in Framingham Reservoir No. 2 and in the Ashland, 
Hopkinton and Whitehall reservoirs always has a much higher color 
than the water from the Wachusett and Sudbury reservoirs or Lake 
Cochituate, and for that reason no water was drawn from these 
reservoirs during the year for supplying the District. There was 
a large growth of Clathrocystis in Framingham Reservoir No. 2 
and in the Ashland Reservoir during August and September. A 
growth of Synura appeared in Whitehall Reservoir early in Octo- 
ber, lasting until the end of the year, and giving the water a very 
objectionable oily odor. 

The water in the distributing reservoirs has been generally free 
from objectionable organisms. There was a growth of Uroglena 



120 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

in the Waban Hill Reservoir in the latter part of January, and a 
growth of Synura in the Weston Reservoir for a week early in July. 
At Spot Pond Uroglena appeared in February and again in June, 
and there was a small growth of Dinobryon in September, but the 
water acquired but little taste or odor and the growths continued 
for but a short time. 

Sanitary Inspection. 

The sanitary inspection of the watersheds has been continued 
under the immediate supervision of William W. Locke, Sanitary 
Inspector. A force varying from 3 to 12 men has also been em- 
ployed to patrol the several reservoirs for the purpose of detecting 
any violations of the regulations of the Board relative to boating, 
fishing, hunting, polluting the water or injuring the property of 
the Commonwealth. 

On the Wachusett watershed 4 cases of typhoid fever were re- 
ported in Holden, 1 in West Boylston and 1 in Boylston, as com- 
pared with 5 cases of typhoid fever and 1 of dysentery during the 
previous year. 

On the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds 5 cases of typhoid 
fever were reported in Marlborough, 5 in South Framingham, 9 in 
JSTatick, 3 in Southborough and 2 in Westborough, a total of 24, as 
compared with 30 during the year 1907. In 14 of these cases the 
patients resided in houses connected with the public sewers which 
discharge outside the watershed. In all cases precautions were taken 
to protect the water supply from danger of pollution. 

There was an epidemic of dysentery in Natick during July, 
August and September, with 118 cases and 20 deaths. There were 
also 3 cases reported in South Framingham. 

The sanitary conditions on the Wachusett watershed have been 
improved by the removal of 17 buildings, 10 of which were on prop- 
erty belonging to the Board, and by the construction of 7 cesspools. 

On account of the business depression very little work has been 
done at the mills on the Quinepoxet River in Holden, and as a 
result there has been a noticeable reduction in the population of 
the town. 

On the Sudbury watershed 51 old and 9 new premises were con- 
nected with the public sewers which convey the drainage outside 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



121 



the watershed. Fourteen of these premises are in Marlborough, 
34 in Westborough and 12 in Framingham. On the Cochitnate 
watershed 71 old and 11 new premises were connected with the 
public sewers. Twenty-six of these are in Framingham and 56 
in Natick. 

In the four places above mentioned which have systems of sewer- 
age which convey the drainage outside the watersheds, there were, 
on December 31, 1908, 3,882 premises connected with the sewers 
and 286 premises not yet connected on streets where there are exist- 
ing sewers, as follows : — 



Premises 

connected with 

Sewers. 



Premises not 

connected with 

Sewers. 



Marlborough, 
Westborough, 
Framingham, 
Natick, . 
Totals, . 




During the year a number of persons were apprehended in vio- 
lations of the regulations of the Board. Seven persons were sum- 
moned into court for violations of the fishing regulations at the Sud- 
bury Reservoir, and 4 of them were fined. Eleven persons were 
discovered bathing in the Sudbury Reservoir. Several of these 
could not afterward be found, having given incorrect names or 
addresses, but 8 were summoned into court and 6 were fined sums 
ranging from $2 to $5. Two persons were discovered bathing in 
Whitehall Reservoir and fined $2 each. A number of boys, gen- 
erally young, were discovered bathing in Dug Pond. Seven of these 
were summoned into court where, on account of their youth, their 
cases were placed on file, with an admonition from the judge that 
a second offence would be followed by fine. At Dudley Pond sev- 
eral men were discovered bathing, but as they were visitors at 
summer cottages and gave false names and addresses they could 
not afterward be found. Under authority given by chapter 539 
of the Acts of 1908 a number of the employes of the Board have 
been authorized to arrest without a warrant persons discovered 



122 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

bathing in any of the reservoirs or streams used for public water 
supply, so that in the future discovery will be more likely to be fol- 
lowed by appearance in court. One man was apprehended hunting 
on land of the Commonwealth at the Sudbury Reservoir, and was 
fined $20 by the judge of the Westborough court. 

The cutting of ice at Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3, the 
Sudbury and Whitehall reservoirs, and Dudley and Waushacum 
ponds, has been inspected to see that the work was done in such a 
way as to prevent pollution of the water supply. 

A summary of the work of sanitary inspection for the year 1908 
is given in the following four tables. The first table shows for the 
Wachusett watershed the number of premises inspected, the classi- 
fication of cases inspected, and the condition of the premises at the 
end of the year; the second table gives the corresponding informa- 
tion for the Sudbury and Cochituate watersheds; the third table 
shows the improvements effected on the Wachusett watershed ; and 
the fourth table the improvements effected on the Sudbury and 
Cochituate watersheds. ' 

The headings of these tables are easily understood, except in a 
few instances : under the heading " Premises Vacant " are included 
all cases which at present furnish no objectionable drainage, but 
which might furnish such drainage if the premises were occupied; 
under the heading " Unsatisfactory " are included all cases where 
there may be, under the most unfavorable conditions, wash from 
privies or direct sink drainage, all suspected cases, and all cases of 
manufacturing wastes entering feeders, even though there may be 
some attempt at previous purification. 

In the third and fourth tables no cases are entered as remedied 
unless complete sewer connections have been made, or all probability 
of future contamination has been removed ; and no cases are entered 
as partly remedied except where positive improvement in the sani- 
tary condition has been effected. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



123 



Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Wachusett Watershed in 1908. 





a 




















Condition 








Classification op 


uASES 


INSPECTED. 




at End of 




03 
m 

a 




















Tear. 




bo 


60 


>> 


>> 


M 


X 




bo 






>, 


District. 


u 

Ph 


r5 °0 


3 


> 


_> 


a 


a 


CO 
03 


.3 


to 


:>> 


o 




C3 

p CO 


OS 

CQ i—l 

CQ 03 
02 !■} 


,2 oo 

oo 

id a 


Q TO 
03 S- 


fl. 03 

w bo 

■** § 
o 5 

•S3 ^ 


"■* 03 

bo 

4J to 
cj.fi 

03 «8 
(I ^ 


JJ bO 

u | 

.3 t- 
-Oft 


s 

CD 
3 

to 


3 . 
o S 

"3-S 


to 

to [> 

CQ 

1 

03 


u 

© 

o 

o3 

<*H 
CQ 

go 


o 

& 

CQ 

v» 

TO 
00 

a 




to 


O 


Q 


ft 


i— ( 


Q 


t-n 


& 


8 


Ph 


^ 


French Brook, . 


60 


30 










4 


33 




5 


58 


2 


Muddy Brook, . 


32 


10 


1 


- 


- 


- 


6 


24 


- 


- 


32 


- 


Gates Brook, . 


139 


95 


3 


- 


- 


- 


4 


58 


- 


5 


138 


1 


Maiden Brook, . 


17 


9 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14 


_ 


1 


17 


- 


Chaffin Brook, . 


167 


75 


6 


- 


1 


- 


13 


78 


l 


16 


157 


10 


Asnebumskit Brook, 


281 


157 


5 


1 


8 


20 


25 


97 


l 


17 


248 


33 


Muschopauge, . 


95 


26 


2 


- 


2 


5 


6 


52 


l 


7 


85 


10 


South Wachusett Brook, 


83 


22 


1 


1 


2 


1 


6 


36 


- 


11 


75 


8 


Trout Brook, . 


37 


4 


_ 


- 


_ 


- 


3 


24 


l 


7 


35 


2 


East Wachusett Brook, . 


208 


61 


2 


2 


3 


5 


23 


109 


- 


7 


191 


17 


Stillwater River, 


148 


47 


3 


- 


2 


1 


8 


85 


- 


6 


143 


5 


Waushacum, 


1632 


49 


1 


- 


2 


1 


6 


61 


- 


8 


156 


7 


French Hill, . 


28 


17 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


15 


" 


3 


28 


- 


Totals, 


1,458 


602 


26 


4 


20 


33 


104 


686 


4 


93 


1,363 


95 



1 On some premises there are 2 or more cases. 

2 Not including 205 summer cottages located near the Waushacum Lakes. 

Summary of Sanitary Inspections on the Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds 

in 1908. 



District. 



§ « 
to 



.Sudbury Watershed. 

Farm Pond 

Framingham Reservoir No. 3 
Stony Brook, 
Angle Brook, 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos 

1 and 2, and Cold Spring 

Brook, 
Eastern Sudbury, 
Indian Brook, 
Western Sudbury, 
Whitehall Reservoir, . 
Cedar Swamp, 

Cochituate Watershed. 

Snake Brook, 
Pegan Brook, 
Course Brook, 
Beaver Dam Brook, 
Dug Pond, 

Totals, 



249 

71 

289 

1,983 



270 
238 
419 
184 
111 
804 



319 

928 

88 

1,089 

500 



7,542 



■2«S 

T3 O 



a: 03 

CO ,£2 



35 

208 
290 



104 
206 
171 
64 
22 
180 



220 
232 
49 
179 
150 



2,118 



Classification of Cases inspected. 



"00 

oo 



22 



Ph a 



T3Q 



21 



0) 

bo 

s •£ 

.3 e3 

co * 
o 

02 



03 




bo 


M bo 


CO 


3 


-2 


03 

Ph 


>-> 

3 . 
■fi ■ 


-^ £ 




S3 03 


*A 


i- 


TO -w 




3 


3 TO 


-O 


3 
03 


^ 


3 
i— i 


8 


* 



41 



35 

46 
129 



102 

43 

168 



S3 



94 
71 

29 
76 
34 



1,061 



20 

50 

113 

248 



111 

42 
83 
50 
37 

128 



68 
110 

41 
180 

49 



1,330 



CO £> 



18 

68 



27 
7 
60 
30 
11 
50 



30 

6 

16 



342 



Condition 
at End of 

Tear. 



248 

68 

271 

1,916 



261 
226 
386 
157 

100 
789 



294 

902 

86 

1 ,042 

478 



i,224 



1 
8 

18 
67 



9 
12 
33 
27 
11 
15 



25 
26 
2 
47 
22 



318 



i On some premises there are 2 or more cases. 



124 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Wachusett Watershed in 1908. 



District. 


Remedied.! re ^ d . 


District. Remedied. 1 


Partly 
remedied. 


French Brook, 
Muddy Brook, 
Gates Brook, 
Maiden Brook, 
Chaffin Brook, 
Asnebumskit Broc 


k, . 


6 

1 

1 
2 
1 


1 
1 

3 


South Wachusett Brook, 
Trout Brook, 
East Wachusett Brook, 
Stillwater River, . 
Waushacum, 
French Hill, . 
Totals, . 


1 
2 
2 
1 


2 


Muschopauge, 




17 7 



i Including buildings torn down or removed. 



Sanitary Improvements effected on the Sudbury and Cochituate Watersheds in 

1908. 



District. 



Remedied by 

Sewer 
Connection. 



Otherwise 
remedied, i 



Partly 
remedied. 



Cesspools 
abandoned 

on Account of 
Sewer 

Connections. 



Sudbury Watershed. 
Farm Pond 

Framingbam Reservoir No. 3, 

Stony Brook, 

Angle Brook, 



Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 1 and 2 and 

Cold Spring Brook. 
Eastern Sudbury, 

Indian Brook, 

Western Sudbury, 

Whitehall Reservoir, 

Cedar Swamp, 

Cochituate Watershed. 
Snake Brook, 

Pegan Brook, 

Course Brook, 

Beaver Dam Brook 

Dug Pond, 

Totals, 



34 

29 

18 
24 



122 



10 



29 

24 

15 
22 



104 



i Including buildings burned, torn down or removed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



125 



Swamp Ditches and Brooks. 

The drainage ditches in swamps on the several watersheds, aggre- 
gating 36.36 miles in length, have been cleaned, and the weeds and 
brush mowed and burned for a width of from 10 to 20 feet on 
either side of the ditches. On the Wachusett watershed about 2,150 
feet of ditches in swamp No. 76 in Sterling, and 820 feet in 
swamp No. 2 in Boylston, were repaved where the paving had been 
trampled out by cattle or washed out during times of high water. 
A standard board bottom ditch, with paved slopes, 1,440 feet long, 
was constructed through and above a small shallow flowage fill on 
the shore of Stillwater basin, and for about 300 feet, to drain a 
small swamp in Boylston preparatory to planting same with pine 
trees. Five bridges crossing ditches in swamps Nos. 1, 2 and 5 
in Boylston have been rebuilt with 2-inch chestnut plank. On the 
Sudbury watershed the ditch on Deerfoot Brook was repaved for a 
distance of about 290 feet, and for 85 feet of this distance the board 
bottom of the ditch was also renewed. The ditches on Mowry, 
Broad Meadow and Brewer brooks were repaired by ramming the 
paving into place and relaying the paving in Broad Meadow Brook 
for a distance of 300 feet. Six farm crossing bridges were rebuilt. 

Observations of the color of water from swamps which have been 
drained have been made monthly. 

The effect upon the color of water flowing from several of the 
larger swamps which have been drained is shown by the following 
tabular statement : — 





Area of 

Watershed 

(Acres). 


Area 
of Swamp 

(Acres). 


Length 

of 
Ditches 

(Feet). 


Colors of Waters (Platinum Standard). 


Swamp. 


BEFORE DRAINING. 


AFTER draining. 


Averages for 
Years 1894, 
1895, 1899. 


Averages for 
Years 1900, 
1901, 1902. 


1907. 


1908. 


Crane, . 
No. 54, . . 
No. 55, . 

No. 76, . 


1,856 
750 

1,625 
225 


460 
72 

220 
26 


45,250 
8,930 

27,661 
6,173 


195 


90 

127 • 
44 


77 
53 
801 

27 


72 
41 
44 
24 



i Nearly one-half of the ditches in swamp 55 were not built until 1907. 



126 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Peotection of Supply. 

On the Wachusett watershed the underbrush and small trees have 
been cut from about 15 acres of land lying north of the Central 
Massachusetts Railroad and between the Wachusett Dam and North 
Dike. This was done in order to remove the shelter which the un- 
derbrush afforded to sightseers and others who were making the 
locality objectionable from a sanitary standpoint. 

A lot of land near Beaver Dam Brook in South Eramingham 
has been for several years used as a dump for refuse material, and 
constant inspection has been necessary to prevent the dumping of 
objectionable matter in close proximity to the brook, which is one 
of the principal feeders of Lake Cochituate. The land has re- 
cently been purchased by the Dennison Manufacturing Company, 
and this company has taken measures to prevent the dumping of 
any objectionable material in the immediate vicinity of the brook. 

In 1907 an agreement was made with the selectmen of the town 
of Framingham by which the Board agreed to pay $2,500 toward 
the cost of constructing a new covered channel, about 1,800 feet 
long, to take the place of the open ditch which was formerly used 
by the city of Boston in running water from Earm Pond to Beaver 
Dam Brook; also of cleaning out and improving the brook channel 
for a further distance of 2,700 feet. The work has been substan- 
tially completed during the past year, and will result in the re- 
moval of the unsightly sluggish ditch which has been a receptacle 
for much objectionable refuse during recent years. 

Eoeestey. 
On land around the Wachusett Reservoir an area of 212 acres 
was planted during the year, 62 acres between April 6 and 18, and 
150 acres between September 18 and October 9. Of the above, 
86 acres were in light grass land, 73 acres pasture, 47 acres sprout 
land and 6 acres in drained swamps. In doing this work there 
were used 253,610 white pines from the Elagg nursery, 3,080 Nor- 
way spruces and 8,285 locusts from the Lamson nursery. The cost 
of removing trees from the nursery and planting them has averaged 
$5.50 per thousand trees, or $6.40 per acre. The cost was some- 
what larger than in previous years, due to greater distance of the 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



127 



planted areas from the nurseries and larger percentages of swamp 
and sprout land, in which the cost of planting is greater. 

The following table gives the information regarding land belong- 
ing to the Board around the reservoir, not including outlying land 
and land along the Quinepoxet River above the reservoir : — 



Area of land which was forested when acquired, not since improved, 

Area of land which was forested when acquired, and since improved, 

Area which has been planted with trees, 

Area which has been planted with trees, and cleared, 

Area to be planted with trees, .... 

Area open, which will probably not be planted, . 

Area of marginal strip along shores of reservoir, . 



Acres. 

1,266 
209 
842 
488 
39 
339 
197 



Total area, 3,380 

Necessary care has been given to the Flagg and Lamson nurseries. 
The Elagg nursery now contains 64,200 white pines and 28,300 
arbor vitse. In the Lamson nursery there are 154,200 arbor vitas, 
4,000 sugar maples, 2,800 ashes, 2,600 locusts, 2,170 white oaks, 
1,150 walnuts and 54 catalpas. The maples, oaks and walnuts are 
dying in spite of considerable care, and will probably not warrant 
the expense of transplanting in the field. 

Work has been continued on the cutting out of all trees and brush 
which interfere with the growth of the young pines. About 324 
acres of land have been treated in this manner, at a cost of about 
$5.85 per acre. Undesirable and mature trees were cut on about 
10 acres preparatory to planting pine trees. The work of making 
an improvement thinning in the ten-year-old forest of white oaks, 
maples and walnuts on Nashaway Island has been completed. An 
area of 8 acres was thinned out, at a cost of about $22 per acre. 

About 3,770 feet of forest roads have been built to take 
the place of roads submerged by the filling of the reservoir. The 
brush and weeds on the 40-foot marginal fire guard and on all 
forest roads have been mowed and burned. 

On land around the Sudbury Reservoir about 4,300 pine trees 
were planted and a few maples were set out alongside the road 
leading to the dam. A number of pine trees were also planted at 
the Weston Reservoir and at several points along the line of the 
Weston Aqueduct. 



128 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Very considerable work has been done in cutting out underbrush 
and undesirable trees, for the double purpose of affording desirable 
trees a better opportunity to grow and of removing hiding places 
for the gypsy and brown-tail moths. This work also results in a 
very decided improvement in the appearance of the property. Work 
of this character has been done by the regular force of employes as 
opportunity offered on lands at the Sudbury and Whitehall reservoirs, 
Framingham Reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3, Lake Cochituate, Sudbury and 
Cochituate aqueducts, Weston Reservoir and Spot Pond. The work 
of protecting trees on Water Works property from the ravages of the 
gypsy and brown-tail moths, elm-leaf beetle and pine-tree weevil has 
necessitated the expenditure of about $7,550 during the year, which 
has been distributed as follows : — 

Spot Pond and Fells Reservoir, . . . . . . . . $3,860 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir, . 780 

Weston Reservoir and Aqueduct, 1,230 

Mystic Lake, Pumping Station and Reservoir, ..... 250 

Sudbury and Cochituate Aqueducts, ....... 325 

Lake Cochituate, 275 

Sudbury Reservoir, . . 270 

Reservoirs in Framingham, Ashland and Hopkinton, . . . 60 

Wachusett Reservoir and Aqueduct, 500 



$7,550 



This was $3,150 less than during the previous year, due very 
largely to the thorough work done on the property around Spot 
Pond during the past few years. 

The methods followed have been the same as in previous years, 
namely, painting egg clusters of the gypsy moths with a mixture 
of creosote and fuel oil, cutting off and burning the nests of the 
brown-tail moths, banding the trees with tanglefoot early in the 
spring, to prevent the caterpillars from ascending the trees, spray- 
ing with arsenate of lead all trees which were found to be infested 
with moths, and banding with burlap the trees in places where moths 
were known or suspected to be present, and destroying the full- 
grown caterpillars which collected under the burlap. Trees infested 
with elm-leaf beetles were sprayed with arsenate of lead, and the trees 
were scraped from the ground to a height of from eight to ten feet. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 129 

At Spot Pond the egg clusters of the gypsy moth were painted 
and the nests of the brown-tail moths were cut off and burned. In 
April 1,500 pounds of tanglefoot were used in banding trees. Later 
in the season the trees on eight acres were sprayed with arsenate of 
lead. 

At Chestnut Hill Reservoir the trees and shrubbery were sprayed 
three times in order to protect them from the moths and elm-leaf 
beetles. The cost of protecting the trees, at both the Chestnut Hill and 
Weston reservoirs, has been much increased on account of the neglect 
of owners of adjoining property. 

Along the line of the Cochituate, Sudbury and Weston aqueducts 
the gypsy moths were destroyed and the egg clusters painted in 
considerable numbers in Newton and Weston, and a few were found 
in Wellesley, Natick and Eramingham. 

At Lake Cochituate about 300 egg clusters of the gypsy moth 
were found and destroyed, generally in the vicinity of summer 
camps. 

During the past year, for the first time the gypsy moths have 
been found at several points on the Water Works property west of 
Framingham, a few at Eramingham Reservoirs Nos. 2 and 3, and 
considerable numbers at the Whitehall Reservoir in Hopkinton. 

At the Sudbury Reservoir about 13,000 nests of the brown-tail 
moths were destroyed, and a considerable number of large elm 
trees in Southborough were scraped and sprayed to destroy the elm- 
leaf beetles. 

No gypsy moths have been found on Water Works property on 
the Wachusett watershed, but large numbers of the brown-tail moths 
have been destroyed in the vicinity of the dam at Clinton, and a 
few nests have been found at the upper end of the reservoir. 

The young pine trees on land around the Wachusett and Sudbury 
reservoirs, of which about one million have been planted during the 
past six years, were, in the middle of the summer, found to be in- 
fested with the pine-tree weevil, which cuts off the young shoots, 
generally the leader, at the top of the tree. The weevils were 
destroyed by cutting off and burning the affected shoots. 



130 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Distributing Reservoirs. 
The distributing reservoirs maintained by the Board are the 
Weston and Chestnut Hill reservoirs; the Waban Hill and Forbes 
Hill reservoirs and the Forbes Hill standpipe of the southern high- 
service system; Spot Pond and the Mystic Reservoir near Tufts 
College of the northern low-service system; the Eells and Bear Hill 
reservoirs of the northern high-service system, and the Arlington 
standpipe of the northern extra high-service system. 

Weston Reservoir. 

No work has been done at this reservoir other than that required 
to keep the grounds and buildings in good order. A large part of 
the work required has been in connection with the protection of 
the trees and shrubs from the gypsy and brown-tail moths. The 
reservoir, with its buildings and grounds, is in good condition. 

Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 
This reservoir, with its gate-houses and grounds, including the 
grounds around the pumping stations, has received the usual care. 
The high retaining wall along the driveway on the north side of 
the reservoir has been repointed. The work of reconstructing and 
resurfacing walks around the reservoir has been continued,, and 300 
linear feet of walk were rebuilt and 1,500 linear feet of walk were 
resurfaced with stone dust. The driveways between the Lawrence 
and Bradlee basins, and the roadway of Beacon Street in front of 
the pumping stations, have been sprinkled seven times with an oil 
emulsion for the purpose of laying the dust. The cost for the sea- 
son was about 2 cents per square yard, which was less than the pre- 
vious cost for sprinkling with water, and the results were much more 
satisfactory. The ironwork in the gate-houses has been scraped 
and painted. On account of the large number of people who visit 
the reservoir grounds during the summer it has been necessary to 
maintain a police force of from three to five men on duty on Sun- 
days and evenings during the summer season. About 55 square 
yards of granolithic walk have been rebuilt in front of the low- 
service pumping station, where the walk had settled and cracked 
on account of the breaking of a high-service force main in 1907. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 131 



Waban Hill Reservoir. 
The reservoir and. grounds have received the usual care and are 
in good condition. 

Forbes Hill Reservoir and Standpipe. 

No other work than the usual care of the grounds and structures 
has been required at this reservoir. The standpipe has been in 
constant use, and the reservoir has been kept full of water but has 
not been drawn upon for the supply of the District. 

A recording gage was connected with the standpipe in August, 
by means of which a constant record is now kept of the elevation 
of the water in the standpipe. 

Spot Pond. 

Early in February Spot Pond was lowered about one foot on 
account of the large consumption of water during the extreme cold 
weather, and during both November and December it was lowered 
for a few days about the same amount in order to furnish water to 
the District while the Sudbury Aqueduct was shut off for cleaning. 
With these exceptions the pond remained very near high-water 
mark throughout the year. 

In addition to the routine work connected with the care of the 
reservoir, the cellar on the site of the Butterfield house has been 
filled, and the ground loamed and seeded. The foreman's house 
and the barns on what were formerly the Bottume and Butterfield 
estates have been painted. 

Considerable time has been expended in endeavoring to prevent 
gulls and ducks from frequenting the pond, as their presence is 
considered to be a menace to the purity of the water. When not 
disturbed both gulls and ducks frequent the pond in large numbers, 
careful estimates making the numbers from 500 to 2,000 on differ- 
ent days during November and December. As a result of their 
presence the rocky islands, several of which rise but little above the 
level of the water in the pond, were covered with a deposit of ex- 
crement which is washed into the water by the rains and waves. 
The ledges at some points became so covered with this deposit that 
the black rocks were given a white appearance. From November 



132 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

9 to 19 and from December 5 to 12 blank cartridges were fired by 
men stationed at different points around the pond, for the purpose 
of disturbing the birds so that they would leave. The result was 
not satisfactory, as the birds, particularly the gulls, continued to 
frequent the pond though in reduced numbers so long as the firing 
was continued, and returned in large numbers as soon as it ceased. 
It is possible that by constantly patrolling the pond with a motor 
boat and using blank cartridges, nearly, if not quite all of the birds 
may be prevented from frequenting the pond. The birds also fre- 
quent the Chestnut Hill Reservoir, but in smaller numbers. 

Mystic Beservoir. 

This reservoir has been in use throughout the year, and has re- 
ceived the usual care. The brickwork of the gate-house has been 
pointed, and steps on the embankment painted. 

Fells and Bear Hill Beservoirs. 

These reservoirs have been in constant use during the year, have 
required no other work than the usual care, and are both in good 
condition. 

Arlington Standpipe. 

This standpipe has required no special attention. The walks 
and driveways were washed by overflow from the standpipe and have 
been resurfaced. 

Mystic Lake and Pumping Station. 

The gate-house at the lake has been painted and the property is 
in good condition. 

Extensive repairs have been made on the interior of the house 
occupied by the Superintendent of Pipe Lines and Reservoirs on 
the pumping station grounds, and this, with the stable and storage 
buildings, has been painted and is now in good order. 

Glenwood Yard. 
The fence on three sides of the yard has been painted. The 
buildings are in good order. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 133 

Chestnut Hill Yard. 

A new maple floor has been laid in the office, and the exterior of 
the carpenter's shop, office building and part of the blacksmith shop 
have been painted. 

Pipe Lines. 
The length of the pipe lines owned and maintained by the 
Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board on December 31, 1908, 
was 84.65 miles, and the length of the mains not less than 4 inches 
in diameter connected with the works, but owned and operated by 
the several cities and towns supplied with water, was 1,484.2 miles. 

Twenty-two leaks have been repaired on the pipe lines maintained 
by the Board, at a cost of $1,377.42. The more important of these 
were a break in the 36-inch high-service main supplying West Rox- 
bury, Dorchester, Quincy and Milton, which occurred on Morton 
Street near Washington Street, in West Roxbury, on February 6, 
and a break in a 24-inch pipe on Broadway near Marshall Street, 
in Somerville, on June 13. In both instances the breaks occurred 
where the pipes lay in a trench excavated in rock, and were ap- 
parently due to the fact that the pipes had settled so as to rest on 
points of the ledge. In both cases large volumes of water escaped 
from the broken pipes, and the surface of the streets in the vicinity 
was washed to a considerable extent. The cost of repairing the 
damages caused by the leak in West Roxbury was $632.44, and of 
the one in Somerville $312.25. The remainder of the leaks were 
small and due to defective lead joints. 

All valves on the pipe lines have been inspected, cleaned and 
oiled, and all air valves tested. An additional connection 16 inches 
in diameter has been made at the junction of Arborway and South 
Street in West Roxbury, between the 48-inch high-service main 
and the 20-inch main supplying water to West Roxbury, for the 
purpose of supplying that district whenever the main south of this 
point is shut off for repairs. 

The 36-inch main crossing Washington Street at Forest Hills in 
West Roxbury was relocated for a distance of 165 feet, to permit 
of the construction of the piers supporting the Boston Elevated Rail- 
way structure. The cost of doing this work, amounting to $2,473.51, 
was paid by the Railway Company. 



134 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The pipe bridges over the Pines rivers in Revere and Saugus, 
over the Saugus River between Saugus and Lynn, and at the Chel- 
sea North Bridge between Chelsea and Charlestown, have been 
painted. The iron beams supporting the pipes over the New York, 
New Haven & Hartford Railroad at Milton have been recovered 
with sheet lead % of an inch in thickness. The 36-inch steel pipe 
over Stony Brook in West Roxbury has been scraped and painted. 

Venturi Meters. 
The number of Venturi meters connected with the pipe system 
on December 31, 1908, was 59, and 46 of these were in constant 
use throughout the year. The work of winding and caring for the 
operating mechanism, and taking the weekly readings to determine 
the consumption of water in the different municipalities, has been 
attended to by two assistants. 

Pressure Regulators and Recording Gages. 

No change in the number or location of the pressure regulators 
was made during the year. A new piston and lining were placed 
in the float operated valve at the Chelsea Reservoir in April, and a 
new piston and lining, with a centre guided stem were placed in 
the valve regulating the pressure to the town of Swampscott on 
August 9. 

A Crown pressure recording gage was set on October 29 in the 
police station in Chelsea Square, to replace the one destroyed in 
the Water Works office during the fire of April 12. A similar 
gage was installed at the Forbes Hill standpipe on August 4. 

The recording gage in Belmont has been transferred from the 
town hall to the water works shop on Waverley Street. 

The average maximum and minimum elevations of the water, due 
to the pressure at nineteen points in different parts of the District, 
as recorded by the gages, are given in Appendix No. 2, Table No. 39. 

Electrolysis. 
The electrical pressures between the pipe linos and street rail- 
way tracks and the electric currents flowing over the water pipes 
were determined over the entire distribution system during June 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 135 

and July. On account of the large currents measured on the low- 
service pipe lines in Brighton, Cambridge and Somerville in June, 
measurements were repeated on these lines in September. Dia- 
grams have been plotted showing the relative potentials of the pipes 
and rails and the intensity of electric currents flowing on the pipe 
lines during the year, for comparison with the conditions in previ- 
ous years. 

Miscellaneous electrical measurements were made at various times 
during the year, in connection with the installation of new insulat- 
ing joints and on account of other special conditions which occurred 
during the year. 

Four insulating joints have been installed during the year, as 
follows : — 

Insulating joint No. 20, located in Atlantic Avenue at Winthrop 
Avenue, Revere, on the 6-inch connection with the Revere distri- 
bution system, was installed June 16. 

Insulating joint No. 21, located in Harvard Avenue, 200 feet 
south of Commonwealth Avenue, Brighton, on 12-inch blow-off pipe 
which connects with the Boston Water Works blow-off pipe at this 
place, was installed July 1. 

Insulating joint No. 22, located in Chapel Street near Longwood 
Avenue, Brookline, on 48-inch low-service main, was installed No- 
vember 19, during the construction of this pipe line. 

Insulating joint No. 23, located at Beacon Street at Harvard 
Street, Brookline, on 36-inch connection with Boston Water Works 
48-inch Beacon Street main, was installed December 3, during the 
construction of the pipe line. 

All of these insulating joints have been installed so that the in- 
tensity of the electric currents flowing on the pipe line at these 
points can be measured and controlled, if desired. The cost of 
installing the joints was paid by the Metropolitan Water and Sewer- 
age Board. 

A comparison for the years 1907 and 1908 of the approximate 
average amount of electricity leaving the various pipe lines and 
flowing into the earth to cause damage to the pipes by electrolysis, 
in the districts where our investigations indicate that the most 
serious injury is being done, is as follows : — 



136 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 









Maximum Cur- 


Description of Pipe Line. 


March 

and April, 1907 

(Amperes). 


June 

and July, 1908 

(Amperes). 


rent flowing 

at Any Point on 

Pipe Line in 

1908 
(Amperes) . 


Easterly 48-inch low service pipe line, Chestnut 


70 


150 


170 


Hill Reservoir to Maiden River. 








"Westerly 48-inch low-service pipe line, Chestnut 


1051 


190 


150 


Hill Reservoir to Mystic River. 








42-inch low-service pipe line in Chelsea and Ev- 


55 1 


160 


310 


erett. 








24-inch low-service pipe lines across Chelsea Creek, 


5 


- 


- 


16 inch high-service pipe line, Boston Avenue, 


10 


30 


S5 


Medford. 








20-inch high-service pipe line in Stoneham, 


25 


25 


33 


16-inch and 12-inch high-service pipe lines in Lynu, 


50 


45 


34 


12-inch high-service pipe line in Hyde Park, . 


5 


5 


7 


48-inch supply pipe line in Newton, 


25 


15 


i 



i Measurements made in October and November, 1907, show much larger currents leaving this 
pipe line. 

The increased flow of electricity measured in October and Novem- 
ber, 1907, on the westerly 48-inch low-service pipe line between the 
Chestnut Hill Reservoir and the Mystic River, and on the 42-inch 
low-service pipe line in Chelsea and Everett, has continued during 
the year, and a similar increase has been measured during the past 
year on the easterly 48-inch low-service pipe line between Chestnut 
Hill Reservoir and the Maiden River. This large increase in the 
current leaving the pipe lines is a most unsatisfactory feature, 
especially as it now appears to be a permanent condition and is due in 
part to the failure of the rubber insulation in some of the insulating 
joints, and in part to an increase in the load on the railway system, 
and is not due to the temporary and erratic load conditions which 
sometimes occur while the measurements are being made. 

The conditions on the other pipe lines show very little change 
from last year. No excavations have been made this year for the 
purpose of examining the pipe lines for electrolytic corrosion, but 
an examination of the easterly 48-inch low-service pipe line under 
the car tracks in Massachusetts Avenue, opposite Norfolk Street, 
in Cambridge, was made on July 20, while a joint leak was being 
repaired. A slight amount of electrolytic corrosion was discovered 
on the pipes at this point. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 137 

Clinton Sewerage. 

The Clinton sewage disposal works were in daily operation 
throughout the year. The quantity of sewage pumped to the filter- 
beds was 787,000 gallons per day, — a decrease of 80,000 gallons 
per day as compared with the preceding year. This decrease was 
undoubtedly due to the small amount of rainfall during the year, 
as the condition of the sewers in the town of Clinton is such that 
ground water in large quantities finds its way into the sewers after 
heavy rainfalls. 

Following are statistics relating to the operation of the pumping 
station : — 

Daily average quantity of sewage pumped (gallons), . . . 787,000 

Daily average quantity of coal consumed (pounds), . . .. 1,426 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, ...... 552 

Number of days pumping, ........ 366 

Cost of pumping : — 

Labor, $1,787 96 

Fuel, 1,144 49 

Repairs and supplies, ......... 226 42 

Total for station, ' . $3,158 87 

Cost per million gallons pumped, . . . . ... . $10 96 

Cost per million gallons raised 1 foot high, ..... 22 

The cost of pumping was $1,420.89 less than for the preceding 
year, due to reduction in the amounts paid for fuel and repairs. 

Filter-beds. 

The sewage was applied on the filter-beds in practically the same 
manner as during the latter half of 1907. 

The eight settling basins into which the sewage is pumped, pre- 
viously to being applied on the filter-beds, were used in rotation 
continuously throughout the vear. During January, February, 
March and December two of the basins were used together for four 
weeks, when they were emptied and two others used. During 
the remainder of the year the basins were used in pairs for a period 
of one week, when they were drained off and cleaned. The prac- 



138 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



tice of giving to the neighboring farmers the sludge accumulating 
in the settling basins was continued until August, and since then it 
has been used as fertilizer upon the lawns about the Wachusett Dam 
and the grassland on the rear slope of the South Dike. 

The filter-beds have been used in rotation continuously through- 
out the year, each bed receiving a dose of 65,000 gallons in thirty 
minutes about once in two days. During previous years only five 
beds were used to care for the sewage during periods of extremely 
low temperature. During the past year, however, all of the beds 
were prepared with furrows 3 feet 6 inches apart, thus allowing 
their use in thirty-minute periods during the entire winter season, 
the same as in the summer time. 

The results of the chemical analyses of the sewage and effluent 
are given in the following table : — 



[Parts per 100,000.] 





1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


January 
to June, 

1908, 
inclusive. 


July to 
December, 

1908, 
inclusive. 


Whole 
Year 
1908. 


Albuminoid ammonia, sew- 


.9233 


.7967 


1.1250 


.8558 


.8442 


.4720 


.6750 


.5735 


age. 

Albuminoid ammonia, efflu- 
ent. 

Per cent, removed, 


.0782 
92 


.0686 
91 


.0787 
93 


.0955 

S9 


.0744 
91 


.0693 
S5 


.0416 
94 


.0554 

9u 


Oxygen consumed, sewage, . 


8.65 


8.57 


13.11 


9.84 


7.87 


2.94 


3.93 


3.43 


Oxygen consumed, effluent, . 


1.12 


.99 


1.126 


1.34 


1.07 


0.94 


0.58 


0.765 


Per cent, removed, 


87 


88 


91 


86 


87 


68 


85 


78 


Free ammonia, sewage, 


3.8292 


3.97 


4.7533 


3.5650 


3.8342 


3.5453 


5.6933 


4.6193 


Free ammonia, effluent, 


1.0185 


.99 


.9588 


1.2723 


1.3176 


1.6067 


1.1377 


1.37-22 


Per cent, removed, 


73 


75 


80 


64 


66 


55 


80 


70 


Nitrogen as nitrates, effluent, 


.4168 


.4046 


.2665 


.1445 


.1664 


.0437 


.2499 


.1468 



The analysis of effluent from these filter-beds has, for several 
years, indicated that the beds were gradually deteriorating in effi- 
ciency, and during the past two or three years the State Board of 
Health has been conducting investigations and experiments for the 
purpose of determining the cause and suggesting a remedy. 

On August 7 the Board requested the State Board of Health to 
give its advice regarding the best method of improving the efficiency 
of the filters. On September 3 that Board reported that it was 
of the opinion that the size of the doses of sewage applied to the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 139 

beds previous to July, 1907, had been too large to permit of proper 
oxidation of the sewage, with the result that the niters had become 
clogged by the accumulation of organic matter in the interstices of 
the sand. The inefficiency of the filters was also thought to be 
partially due to uneven distribution of sewage on the surface of the 
filters, and to insufficient underdrainage. Upon the receipt of this 
advice immediate steps were taken to lay additional underdrains 
and to provide carriers for distributing the sewage. The laying 
of the underdrains was commenced on October 9 and continued 
until November 15, when work was suspended for the season. The 
work accomplished included the laying of two lines of 6-inch under- 
drains, aggregating 5,542 feet in length, under twelve of the twenty- 
four beds to be drained, the cleaning and relaying of 500 feet of 
8-inch underdrain which had become clogged and useless, and the 
construction of the necessary manholes, lamp holes and outlet drains. 
This work was done at a cost of $2,770.99. The completed plan 
provides for four lines of 6-inch vitrified pipe underdrain, equally 
spaced across each one-acre bed and laid at a depth of from 5 to 7 
feet below the surface of the ground, and a sewage carrier extending 
about three-fourths of the distance across the bed from the centre 
of one side, constructed with a flat concrete bottom and vertical 
wooden sides, arranged with openings so as to get an equal distri- 
bution of the sewage over the entire bed. The area of the filter- 
beds is also to be increased by utilizing about three acres of the 
ground heretofore not available. 

The cost of maintaining the filter-beds, exclusive of the cost of 
the work in connection with the laying of new underdrains, has been 
as follows : — 

Labor, $3,050 12 

Repairs and supplies, ......... 97 06 

Total, $3,147 18 

Cost per million gallons treated, ....... 10 92 

Daily tests of the sewage and effluent, to determine the amount 
of dissolved oxygen and iron, have been made by the keeper in 
charge of the beds. 



140 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Engineering. 

The greater portion of the time of the engineering force is now 
devoted to matters pertaining to the maintenance and operation of 
the works. The more important of these matters are the superin- 
tendence of the operation of the Yenturi meters and of the flow of 
water from the several reservoirs through the aqueducts ; the deter- 
mination of the quantities of water used in the several municipali- 
ties ; the tabulation of the records of rainfall as measured at twelve 
stations on the works, of the elevations of the several storage and 
distributing reservoirs, and of the pressures in the mains at differ- 
ent points in the Metropolitan District; the making of calculations 
to determine the yield of the several watersheds, the quantities 
delivered by the several aqueducts, the quantities pumped at the 
several pumping stations and the cost of pumping, the testing of 
coal and oil; and the examination of the pipes to determine the 
injury from electrolytic action. 

Hydraulic measurements have been made to determine the loss 
of pressure in the mains, due to the tuberculation of the pipes. 
Official trials have been made of the pumping engines at the new 
Arlington station. Studies have been made for an addition to the 
pumping station in West Roxbury and for installing an additional 
pumping engine and boiler. Detail plans have been prepared for 
an ash hoist and storage bin at the Spot Pond pumping station. 
Record plans showing the pipes have been corrected to conform to 
changes made on the ground. 

Appended to this report are tables of contracts giving the amount 
of work done and other information, a long series of tables relating 
to the maintenance of the Metropolitan Water Works, tables show- 
ing the length of main pipes and number of service pipes, meters 
and fire hydrants in the Metropolitan Water District, and a sum- 
mary of statistics for 1908. 

Respectfully submitted, 

DEXTER BRACKETT. 

Chief Engineer. 
Boston, January 1, 1909. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



141 



EEPORT OF CHIEF ENGINEER OF SEWERAGE 

WORKS. 



To the Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board. 

Gentlemen : — The following is a report of the operations of 
the Engineering Department of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works 
for the year ending December 31, 1908. 



Oeganization. 
The engineering organization during the year has been as 
follows : — 



Division Engineers : — 
Frederick D. Smith, 



Frank I. Capen, . 



Seth Peterson, 



In charge of maintenance and construction, 
South Metropolitan System, in Quincy 
and Milton. 

In charge of maintenance and construction, 
North Metropolitan System and extension 
of the High-level Sewer in Brookline and 
Brighton. 

In charge of construction, Section 80, in- 
cluding air tunnel, and of Section 81, 
South Metropolitan System. 



In addition to the above, there were employed at the end of the 
year 24 engineering and other assistants. 



142 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE DISTRICTS. 

Areas and Populations. 

During the year no changes have been made in the extent of the 
sewerage districts. The area of the North Metropolitan District 
remains at 90.50 square miles, and of the South Metropolitan Dis- 
trict at 100.87 square miles, — a total, inclusive of water surfaces, 
of 191.37 square miles. These districts include the whole or parts 
of 25 cities and towns, as set forth in the following table. 

The populations in the table are based on the census of 1905. 

Table showing Areas and Estimated Populations within the Metropolitan Sewerage 

District, as of December 31, 1908. 



City or Town. 



Area (Square 
Miles) . 



Estimated Popu- 
lation. 



o . 

•us rt 

& 00 



f Arlington, 

Belmont, 

Boston (portions of ), 

Cambridge, . 

Chelsea, 

Everett, 

Lexington,' . 

Maiden, 
{ Medford, 

Melrose, 

Revere, . 

Somerville, . 

Stoneham, 

Wakefield, . 

Winchester, . 

Winthrop, 
LWoburn, 



o 

©"5 



?s 



{ Boston (portions of), 

Brookline, 

Dedham,! 

Hyde Park, . 
{ Milton, . 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 
LWatertown, . 



Totals, 



5.20 
4.66 
3.45 
6.11 
2.24 
3.34 
5.11 
5.07 
8.35 
3.73 
5.86 
3.96 
5.50 
7.65 
5.95 
1.61 
12.71 



20.39 

6.81 

9.40 

4.57 

12.59 

16.88 

12.56 

13.63 

4.04 



90.50 



100.87 



191.37 



10,5S0 

4,750 

96,680 

102,680 

31,600 

32,800 

4,350 

40,920 

21,590 

15,230 

14,590 

74,720 

6,690 

11,130 

9,180 

7,960 

14,490 



170,700 
26,300 
7,900 
15,350 
7,680 
40.S00 
30,960 
28,350 
12,450 



499,940 



340,490 
840,430 



i Part of town. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



143 



METROPOLITAN SEWERS. 
Sewers Purchased and Constructed and their Connections. 

Within the Sewerage Districts there are now 101.35 miles of Met- 
ropolitan sewers. Of this total, 8.79 miles of sewers, with the 
Quincy pumping station, have been purchased from cities and towns 
of the districts, the remaining 92.56 miles of Metropolitan sewers and 
other works having been constructed by the Metropolitan boards. 

The locations, lengths and sizes of these sewers are given in the 
following tables, together with other data referring to the public and 
special connections with the system : — 

North Metropolitan System. 







on 


§ §oo" 


Special Connections. 






3 


g §1 




a a 


City or Town. 


Size of Sewers. 


_a 


„ MOO 


Character or Location of 








+3 

60 
S3 


ubli< 
tion 
ber 


Connection. 


a ® 






J 


Pm 




& 


Boston : — 












Deer Island, 


6' 3" to 9', . 


1.367 


4 


- 


- 


East Boston, 


9'tol' 


5.467 


23 


Shoe factory, 


1 


Charlestown, . 


O^'xT'^'to-l', . 


3.292 


uj 


Navy Yard," .... 

Almshouse 

Club house 


8 
1 
1 




9' 




11 j 


Fire Dept. Station, 
Private building, 


1 
1 








r 


Bakery, .... 


1 


Chelsea, 


g/ 4 // x9 / 2" to 1' 10" x 2' 4", . 


5.123 


9^ 


Rendering works, 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 








I 


blow-off, .... 


1 








r 


I Metropolitan Water Works 




Everett, 


8' 2"xS / 10" to 4' S"x5' 1", . 


2.925 


6 i 


blow-off, .... 
Cameron Appliance Co., . 


1 
1 








i 


Shultz-Goodwin Co., . 
Metropolitan Water Works 


1 


Maiden, 


4' 6"X4' 10" to V 3", . 


4.4931 


27 J 

( 


blow-off, .... 
Private buildings, 
Private buildings, 


1 
137 

109 


Melrose, 


4/ 6"x4 / 10" to 10", 


6.0992 


34 1 


Factory, .... 
Railroad station, . 


1 

1 


Cambridge, . 


5 / 2"x5 / 9"tol / 3", 


7.167 


n| 


Slaughter house, . 
City Hospital, 


1 
2 








r 
1 


Tannery, .... 
Slaughter-houses (3), . 


1 
1 


Somerville, . 


6' 5" XT' 2" to V 10" X 2' 3", . 


3.471 


10-1 

1 


Car-house, .... 
Street railway power house, 


1 
1 








( 




1 








Rendering works, 


1 








r 


Armory building, 


1 


Medford, 


4 / 8"x5 / l"tol0", 


5.359 


21 1 


Private buildings, 

Stable 


8 
1 








I 


Police sub-station, 


1 








r 
i 


Tannery, .... 
Private buildings, 


2 

2 


Winchester, . 


2 / ll"x3 / 3"to 1'3", . 


6.428 


184 


Gelatine factory, 

Stable, 


1 
1 








I 


Railroad station, . 


1 


Stoneham, . 


V 3" to 10", . 


0.010 


4 


_ _ 


_ 


Woburn, 


l / 10"x2 / 4"tol / 3", . 


0.933 


3 


Glue factory, 


1 



1 Includes .988 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Maiden. 

2 Includes .736 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Melrose. 



144 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 





North Metropolitan System — 


Concluded. 






Size of Sewers. 


00 

09 

1 

S 

A 

a 


Public Connec- 
tions, Decern- 1 
ber 31, 1908. 


Special Connections. 


City or Town. 


Character or Location of 
Connection. 


s a 
"".2 

£> u 

a ® 

a a, 

1° 


Arlington, . 

Belmont, 2 
Wakefield, 2 . 
Revere, 


1' 6" to 10", 

4' to 3' 


3.5201 
0.048 


35 j 

3 

1 
2 


Private buildings, . 
Railroad station, . ... 
Car house, .... 


121 
1 
3 




58.566 s 


251 


421 



South Metropolitan System. 



Boston (Back Bay), 



Boston (Brighton) . 

Boston (Dorches- 
ter). 

Boston (Roxbury). 

Boston (West Rox- 
bury). 
Brookline, 
Dedham, 
Hull, . 

Hyde Park, 

Milton, . 

Newton, 

Quincy, 

Waltham, 

Watertown, 



6' 6" to 3' 9", . 

5 / 9"x6 / 0"to 12", . 

3 / x4 / to2 / 6"x2 / 7", 

6'6"x7', 4'0", . 

9 / 3"xl0 / 2"tol2", . 

6 / 6"x7 / 0"to5 / 6", . 
4'x4' 1" to 3 / 9"x3' 10", . 
60" pipe, . 

10 / 7"Xll / 7"to4 / x4 / l", . 

H'Xl2'to8", . 

4 / 2"x4'9"to 1'3", . 
H / 3"xl2 / 6"to24" pipe, 
3 / 6"x4 / , . . . . 
4'2"x4 / 9"to 12", . 





r 


1.5004 


io i 


5.537 5 


1 

1 
n 

r 


2.8706 


»1 


1.430 


I 


7.596 


2 

5 


2.382 
2.350 
0.750 


4.527 


15) 


3.600 
2.911 
6.580 
0.001 
0.7507 


11 

6 
4 
1 
5 


42.784 


89 



Tufts Medical School, . 
Private house, . 
Administration building, Bos 

ton Park Department, . 
Simmons College buildings, 
Art Museum, . 
Abattoir, . . 
Chocolate works, 
Machine shop, . 
Paper mill. 
Private buildings, . 

Parental school, 

Lutheran Evangelical Church 

Private buildings, . 



Mattapan Paper Mills, 
Private buildings, . 

Private houses, 
Factories, . 



•28 



1 Includes 2.631 miles of sewer purchased from the town of Arlington. 

2 The Metropolitan sewer extends but a few feet into the towns of Belmont and Wakefield. 

s Includes 2.787 miles of Mystic River valley sewer in Medford, Winchester and Woburn, run. 
ning parallel with the Metropolitan sewer. 

* Includes .355 of a mile of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

5 Includes .026 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 

6 Includes 1.24 miles of sewer purchased from the city of Boston. 

1 Includes .025 of a mile of sewer purchased from the town of Watertown. 



Cost of Construction. 

[To December 31, 1908.] 

The cost of the 101.35 miles of Metropolitan sewers enumerated 
above, including seven stations, siphons and appertaining structures, 
may be summarized as follows : — 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



145 



North Metropolitan System, . 
South Metropolitan System, . 



$6,171,165 12 
8,741,869 20 

$14,913,034 32 



Information relating to areas, populations, local sewer connections 
and other data for the whole Metropolitan Sewerage District appear 
in the following table : — 

North Metropolitan District. 



Area 
(Square 
Miles) . 



Estimated 

Total 
Population. 



90.50 



499,940 



Miles of 
Local Sewer 
connected. 



639.50 



Estimated 

Population 

contributing 

Sewage. 



424,050 



Ratio of 

Contributing 

Population 

to Total 
Population 
(Per Cent.). 



84.8 



Connections made 
with Metro- 
politan Sewers. 



Public. 



251 



Special. 



421 



South Metropolitan District. 


100.87 


340,490 


492.86 


201,595 


59.2 


89 

1 


28 


Entire Metropolitan District. 


191.37 


840,430 


1,132.36 


625,645 


74.4 


340 


449 



Of the estimated gross population of 840,430 on December 31, 
1908, 625,645, representing 74.4 per cent., were on that date con- 
tributing sewage to the Metropolitan sewers, through a total length 
of 1,132.36 miles of local sewers owned by the individual munic- 
ipalities. These sewers are connected with the Metropolitan System 
by 340 public and 449 special connections. It appears, also, that 
there has been during the year an increase of 28.11 miles of local 
sewers connected with the Metropolitan System, and that 14 public 
and 26 special connections have been added. 



Pumping Stations and Pumpage. 
The following table shows the average daily volume of sewage 
lifted at each of the six Metropolitan pumping stations during the 
year, as compared with the corresponding volumes for the previous 
year : — 



146 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Pumping Station. 



Average Daily Pumpage. 



Jan. 1, 1907, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1907. 



Jan. 1, 1S08, 

to 
Dec. 31, 1908. 



Increase during 
the Year. 



Deer Island, 

East Boston, 

Charlestown, 

Alewife Brook, 

Quincy, 

Ward Street (actual gallons pumped), 



Gallons. 
64,300,000 

62,300,000 

32,600,000 

4,123,000 

3,615,000 

21,200,000 



Gallons. 

59,800,000 

57,800,000 

31,300,000 

3,627,000 

3,687,000 

22,300,000 



Gallons. 
4,500,000 

4,500,000 

1,300,000 

496,000 

72,000 

1,100,000 



Per Cent. 
7.0 1 

7.2 1 

4.0 1 

12.01 

2.0 

5.2 



i Decrease. 



CONSTRUCTION. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

Chapter 556 of the legislative Acts of 1908 provided an appro- 
priation of $445,000 for extensions and additions to the East Boston 
and Deer Island pumping stations. 

Chapter 582 of the legislative Acts of 1908 provided $40,000 for 
the restoration of the existing East Boston pumping station, dam- 
aged during the great Chelsea fire of April 12, 1908. 

Construction at Deer Island Station. 

During the year concrete foundations for the engine house ex- 
tensions of the Deer Island pumping station have been built by day 
labor, under the direction of the Engineer. 

This engine house is located near the high-water line of the 
harbor, and to secure safe foundations below the peat and other 
vegetable deposits on the shore these foundations were extended to 
a depth of about 15 feet below the general surface of the ground at 
the engine house, which is about elevation 116. The foundations are 
of Portland concrete, about 4 feet in thickness. On the northerly side 
of the house the extension is to rest on the existing outfall sewer, 
and the foundation was extended to the roof of this sewer, which 
was substantially reinforced with concrete and steel. 

A chamber for placing a 60-inch cast-iron discharge pipe, with 
valve chamber, Venturi meter chamber and controlling manholes 
at the outfall sewer, has been constructed in connection with this 
work. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 147 

The foundations for this extension are now fully completed in 
condition for building the superstructure during the coming spring. 
Detailed plans for superstructures of the extensions of the engine 
and coal houses have been prepared during the year and contracts for 
the construction are now being arranged, which contemplate that 
work on these buildings will be started as early as April 1 and com- 
pleted by September 1. 

The buildings are to be of brick, with trimmings and stone work 
in agreement with the architectural lines of the existing station. The 
engine house extension will be 50 feet long by 46 feet wide. The 
coal house extension will be 103 feet long and 35 feet wide. 

The existing road which passes the extension of the engine house 
has been moved about 10 feet nearer the harbor, and to defend this 
road against the tide wash during high seas, the granite wall along the 
sea side of the highway fronting the engine house has been extended 
about 150 feet. The heel of this wall has been defended by heavy 
riprap. This work has also been carried out by day labor under the 
direction of the Engineer. 

On November 2 a contract was arranged with the Allis-Chalmers 
Company of Milwaukee for furnishing and erecting at the Deer 
Island station one one-hundred-million-gallon pump and engine, 
four boilers, economizer, piping and appurtenances. This additional 
pumping plant is to be in place for service within two years of the 
date of the contract. 

The contract provides that the pump shall be of the same general 
heavy and slow-running, centrifugal type as that already installed at 
the station. The boilers are to be of the internally fired, horizontal, 
tubular type, from designs by E. W. Dean, Mechanical Engineer. 

Construction" at East Boston Station. 
On the afternoon of Sunday, April 12, the great Chelsea fire 
reached the shores of Chelsea Creek, near the East Boston pumping 
station, by the middle of the afternoon. The fire service at the sta- 
tion defended the property until about 5 p.m. At that time a barge 
of inflammable material on the creek near the oil works exploded, 
and the flames were carried by the incoming tide up to and around 
the station. The flames mounted up the sides of the station to the 
roof, and in a few minutes the doors, windows, roof, coal house and 
wharf were a mass of flames. 



148 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

The pumping service at the station was abandoned about 5.30 
p.m. The Charlestown pumping station was also shut down about 
10 p.m. and remained shut down until April 17. 

During the night many of the larger combined sewers were sealed 
off from the Metropolitan System and the discharge from them 
turned into the harbor. 

On Monday, April 13, and later, the overflows in the Metropoli- 
tan Sewer were raised to about elevation 107, and this arrangement 
resulted in forcing through the pumps and passages of the aban- 
doned station from 18,000,000 to 25,000,000 gallons of sewage per 
day, or about one-half the ordinary quantity pumped at this station 
in dry weather. This probably provided for all sewage from- separate 
systems connected with the works and some sewage from a few of 
the more offensive of the connections with combined svstems. 

The fire entirely destroyed roofs, doors, windows, coal house and 
wharf at this station. The girders and most of the piping of the 
station were a mass of twisted iron and steel. The walls were 
scarred and cracked and had fallen in places. 

An examination of the building by experts indicated that the 
foundations and walls were safe to cover with a light, temporary 
roof. An examination of the machinery indicated that pumps, 
steam cylinders and boilers had not been greatly injured. 

Between April 13 and April 27 a temporary wooden roof, 
doors and windows were placed by Woodbury & Leighton, builders. 
While the temporary roof was being placed, necessary repairs to one 
engine, piping and two boilers were made by the engineers of the 
works. One engine was started on the afternoon of April 26, just 
two weeks after the date of the fire, and since that date the service 
of the station and works has been normal. 

A second engine and second pair of boilers were started on May 8, 
one week after the first, and the third engine and last pair of boilers 
were fully repaired and ready for service on June 3. 

Of the $40,000 appropriated for repairs to this station by chapter 
582, Acts of 1908, about $20,000 remains, which will doubtless 
provide a permanent roof, doors, windows, etc., when the details for 
the permanent rebuilding of this station have been fully developed. 

Chapter 556, Acts of 1908, authorized an expenditure of $250,000 
for extensions to existing buildings and an additional engine and 
new boilers at this station. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 149 

At the date of this report the details of the future development 

at this station have not been fully determined, so that no construction 

authorized by chapter 556 of the Acts of 1908 has yet been carried 

out. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SYSTEM. 

Extension of the High-level Sewer through West Roxbury, 

Brooexine and Brighton. 
This extension, authorized by chapter 406 of the Acts of 1906, in- 
volving a length of 5.64 miles of main sewers, varying from 7 feet to 
5 feet in diameter, is practically completed at the date of this report. 
Of the seven sections into which it has been divided for purposes 
of construction and record, five have been fully completed. On the 
other two about 145 feet remain to be completed. It is anticipated 
that this work will be fully completed by the middle of February. 

Section 80, West Roxbury and BrooMine. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Superintendent of Construction by Bay Labor. — Charles A. Haskin. 

This section was completed on July 30, 1908. It was constructed 
largely in tunnel by pneumatic process, by day labor, under the 
direction of Charles A. Haskin, pneumatic expert. 

The section is 3,123 feet in length. For a distance of about 204 
feet, at the westerly end, it was found that the sewer would be built 
in dry sand and gravel at a depth of about 22 feet below the surface 
of the street. This length of 204 feet was, by action of the Board, 
added to the contract for Section 81, and was constructed in open 
trench by Bruno & Petitti, between May 18 and July 30, 1908. 

The excavation was in dry sand and gravel. The masonry sec- 
tion was of the horseshoe type, 7 feet by 6 feet 6 inches in diameter. 
The walls of the sewer are of Portland concrete, about 15 inches in 
thickness. 

The length of pneumatic tunnel constructed on this section is 
2,919 feet. At the date of the last report, 2,560 feet of headings 
had been completed. The remaining 359 feet, largely in rock and in 
part rock and earth headings, were driven between January 1 and 
May 20, when the headings were completed. 

At the date of the last report 2,215 feet of the masonry lining of 
the tunnel had been placed, — 885 feet in the easterly headings and 
1,330 feet in the westerly heading. The 314 feet of masonry lining 



150 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

placed during the year in the westerly heading is of circular cross-sec- 
tion, 7 feet in diameter, with walls not less than 12 inches in thick- 
ness. In the easterly heading the masonry last year had been built 
into the solid rock. No masonry was placed this year in this head- 
ing until it had been blasted through to its connection with the branch 
at the bellmouth in Centre Street. During the year 401 feet of this 
heading in Roxbury pudding-stone has been lined with Portland 
cement concrete. The tunnel headings were about 10 feet in diam- 
eter and the finished diameter of the sewer 7 feet, making the walls 
for this length about 18 inches in thickness. 

The masonry shaft on Perkins Street, about 475 feet east of 
Jamaicaway, from which the tunnel excavation has been made, has 
been completed with masonry to the surface, finished with standard 
iron cover, and left in condition to be used for ventilation or in 
cleaning this length of tunnel. 

Section 81, Broohline. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Seth Peterson. 

Contractors. — Bruno & Petitti, Contract No. 60 (Sta. ■ to 21 + 40). Hugh 
Nawn Contracting Company, Contract No. 61 (Sta. 21 + 40 to 34 + 15). 

This section extends from near the boundary line between West 
Roxbury and Brookline, near the junction of Chestnut Street and 
Pond Avenue, along Chestnut, Kendall and Cypress streets to Boyl- 
ston Street, in Brookline, — a distance of 3,415 feet. 

Two contracts were made for this construction previous to the 
date of the last report; one, with Bruno & Petitti, extending from 
the town line along Chestnut and Kendall streets, — a distance of 
2,140 feet. 

Work was started on this contract on March 3, 1908. The ex- 
cavation was to an average depth of about 21 feet from the surface 
to the bottom of the masonry. 

The excavation for the first 200 feet was in sand and gravel; 
and for the next 600 feet in sand and gravel with boulders, and with 
ledge in the bottom for about 125 linear feet, having an average 
depth of about 3 feet. 

From about 150 linear feet northerly from Hi°;h Street for 1,000 
feet, near the corner of Chestnut and Kendall streets, the excava- 
tion was in sand, gravel and clay, with rock in the bottom for about 
325 linear feet. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 151 

For about 150 linear feet, near the corner of Chestnut and 
Kendall streets, fine yellow sand extended nearly to grade; below 
this was sand and gravel. For the remainder of the contract, through 
Kendall Street, the excavation was in sand, clay and gravel, with 
rock in the bottom for the last 130 feet extending from to 8 feet 
in depth. No large amount of* ground water was encountered ; a 
four-inch centrifugal pump, operated automatically by electricity, 
ran about one-half of the time. 

A bucket excavator was used on the work through Chestnut Street 
and for about one-half of the length of Kendall Street; for the re- 
maining distance on Kendall Street an " A " frame derrick was 
used. The work with this derrick was started on July 6, 1908, and 
the last 200 feet of the section was excavated by this method. 

In April, 204 linear feet of Section 80 were added to the contract 
of Bruno & Petitti, as previously mentioned in this report. The 
work on this additional 204 feet was started on May 18 and finished 
about July 20. This contract was finished on December 8, 1908. 
Owing to severe weather conditions at this season of the year the 
resurfacing of the streets has been left until spring. 

As noted in the last report, a second contract on this section, 
extending from Kendall Street through Cypress Street to Boylston 
Street, a distance of 1,2 7 5 feet, was made with the Hugh Nawn 
Contracting Company. 

Work on this contract had been commenced at the time of the 
last report, and 130 linear feet of trench excavated near Boylston 
Street. A tunnel shaft had then been excavated at the corner of 
Cypress and Kendall streets and a heading started. 

A second shaft was started on January 10, 1908, about 200 feet, 
north from Walnut Street, and a tunnel heading started to meet 
the heading from the shaft at the corner of Cypress and Kendall 
streets; these headings were driven through rock. The open cut 
from Boylston Street was continued to meet the shaft near Walnut, 
Street, with the exception of about 50 feet which was tunnelled, 
passing some trees near Milton Road, and under three water pipes, 
and the car tracks in Boylston Street. The excavation for the open 
cut was in sand, clay and gravel, with rock for the last 7 feet. 

A small amount of water was encountered on this section, esti- 
mated at 150,000 gallons per day. 

The work was completed on August 15, 1908. 



152 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Section 82, Brookline. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractors. — T. J. O'Connell, Contract No. 57 (Sta. + 30 to 13 + 50). T. 

J. O'Connell, Contract No. 55 (Sta. 30 + 50 to 48 + 50). James Driscoll 

& Son, Contract No. 56 (Sta. 13 + 50 to 30 + 50). 

This section extends from Boylston Street, along Cypress Street, 
Brington Road, private lands, Brookline Playground, Davis and 
Gorham avenues, Greenough, Washington and Park streets, to Bea- 
con Street, — a distance of 4,830 feet. 

This section was practically completed at the date of the last 
annual report. 

There remained to be completed the resurfacing of streets and 
sidewalks on the three contracts. This was finished during the 
months of March and April. 

Section 83, Brookline. 
Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractors. — Charles G. Craib & Co., Contract No. 54 (Sta. 16 + 64 to 
24 + 64). T. J. O'Connell, Contract No. 62 (Sta. to 16 + 64). 

As noted in the last report, two contracts were arranged for con- 
struction; one, with Charles G. Craib & Co., for a length of 800 
feet, completed previous to January 1, 1908, and discussed in the 
last report. 

On the second contract, that with T. J. O'Connell, for a length 
of 1,664 feet, work had been started at three tunnel shafts at that 
date; one, at Beacon Street, a heading extending northerly across 
Beacon Street toward Winchester Street, had been excavated 66 
feet. This was continued for 422 linear feet and met a heading 
driven southerly from a shaft about 800 feet north of Beacon 
Street in Winchester Street, which had advanced 30 feet on January 
1, 1908. The distance between these shafts is about 800 feet. " 

A heading northerly from this shaft had advanced 30 feet, and 
one from a shaft near Fuller Street 25 feet southerly. Work was 
continued in both these headings until they met on May 6. 

The length of tunnel driven since the last report is 1,484 feet. 

The excavation northerly from the shaft at Beacon Street was 
through dry sand for 400 feet. For the remainder of the distance 
to the shaft, near Fuller Street, the excavation was in sand and 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 153 

gravel, with clay at either the bottom or roof for nearly the entire 
distance; but a small amount of water was encountered. The ma- 
sonry lining was of Portland concrete, with a minimum thickness of 
12 inches. The headings were not allowed to be driven over 30 feet 
in advance of the masonry lining. About 50 linear feet of the ma- 
sonry had been placed on January 1, 1908; masonry was finished 
on May 22. 

Section 8Jf, BrooMine and Brighton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractor. — D. F. O'Connell, Contract No. 53, 

This section extends from near Winchester Street, through private 
lands and Columbia Street in Brookline, and in Harlan Street, pri- 
vate lands and Commonwealth Avenue in Brighton, to near Allston 
Street, — a distance of 2,168 feet. 

This section was fully completed prior to the date of this report. 

Section 85, Brighton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Superintendent of Construction by Day Labor. — Chas. A. Haskin (Sta. to 

11 + 42). 
Contractors. — Geo. M. Bryne Company, Contract No. 63 (Sta. 11 + 42 to 

24 + 00). D. F. O'Connell Company, Contract No. 64 (Sta. 24 + 00 to 

47 + 00). Hugh Nawn Contracting Company, Contract No. 65 (Sta. 47 

+ 00 to 63 + 50). 

This section extends from near Allston Street, along Common- 
wealth Avenue, Warren, Cambridge and Washington streets, to near 
Lake Street, — a distance of 6,350 feet. The lower portion of this 
section was constructed by the Board by day labor. Three contracts 
have been made for the construction of the remainder of the section. 

As stated in the last report, the portion of this section constructed 
by day labor was completed previous to that date. 

Actual work on the contract for the portion of the section in 
Warren Street, 1,258 feet in length, George M. Bryne Company, 
contractors, had not been commenced. Work was started on the 
excavation of a shaft, about 12 feet square, near the middle of the 
contract on January 2, 1908. This was to grade February 7, 1908, 
and headings were started in either direction on February 10, 1908. 
The westerly heading was completed on May 20, and the easterly 
heading on May 28. The tunnel has been lined with Portland con- 
crete, with a minimum thickness of 12 inches; the finished section 



154 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

is 6 feet high by 5 feet 9 inches wide. The masonry lining was 
started on May 26, 1908, and completed on July 27, 1908. The 
manhole at the shaft was completed on August 10. The excavation of 
the tunnel was through solid rock for the entire distance and but 
little water was encountered. 

At the date of the last report, under the contract with the D. F. 
O'Connell Company, for a portion of the section in Warren, Cam- 
bridge and Washington streets, 2,300 feet in length, a shaft near the 
middle of the section had been excavated to a depth of 38 feet. This 
shaft was excavated to grade on January 15, 1908. 

A heading was started westerly from this shaft on January 30, 
and easterly on February 3. The east heading was finished on 
August 1. Excavation in the west heading was stopped on August 
18 on account of losing the rock in the roof of the tunnel heading 
about 70 feet from the end of the contract, and the driving was post- 
poned until the masonry lining was placed to near this point. Work 
in the heading was resumed on October 27 and finished on No- 
vember 30. 

The masonry lining in the east heading was commenced on Sep- 
tember 3 and in the west heading on September 21. The tunnel was 
lined with Portland concrete. 

The finished section is of the horseshoe shape, 6 feet high by 5 
feet 9 inches wide. The lining has a minimum thickness of 12 
inches. The concrete was finished, except for about 30 feet near the 
shaft, on December 31. This will probably be finished and a shaft 
manhole built during January of 1909. 

For the entire length of tunnel, except for about 200 feet, the 
excavation has been in solid rock. For this 200 feet the tunnel 
had an earth roof requiring timbering. Of this length, 40 feet 
were wholly in earth. It is estimated that the maximum amount 
of water pumped at the central shaft has been about 300.000 gallons 
per twenty-four hours. 

Work on the contract made with the Hugh Nawn Contracting 
Company for the portion of the section in Washington Street, for 
1,650 linear feet, was started previous to January 1, 1908. A shaft 
about 200 feet west from Foster Street had been excavated to a depth 
of 42 feet. This shaft was excavated to grade on January 14, and a 
heading started westerly on January 25 and easterly on January 29. 
These headings were finished on May 16 and 12, respectively. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 155 

A second shaft was started just easterly from Foster Street on 
February 25, and excavated to grade on March 24. Headings were 
started in either direction on April 2. The westerly heading was 
finished on May 12. The masonry lining of that portion of the 
tunnel between the second shaft and the easterly end of the contract 
was started on May 23, and finished on July 17. The driving of the 
easterly heading from the second shaft was through wet sand and 
gravel with some clay. On June 23 the driving from this shaft was 
stopped when the heading had advanced well into solid rock. This 
heading was lined with masonry, and the excavation in the rock 
heading again started on July 16 and continued until completed on 
October 10. The masonry lining was finished on November 23 and 
the shaft backfilled on November 28. 

The excavation for this contract was in solid rock for 1,040 linear 
feet, in sand and gravel for 400 linear feet, and part rock and part 
earth for 210 linear feet. The masonry lining is of Portland con- 
crete, of horseshoe cross-section, 5 feet 9 inches wide by 6 feet high, 
with a minimum thickness of 12 inches. It is estimated that the 
maximum amount of ground water pumped per twenty-four hours 
was 300,000 gallons. 

Section 86, Brighton. 

Division Engineer in Charge. — Frank I. Capen. 

Contractors. — Glenn & Broderick, Contract No. 66, for 1,650 linear feet of 
12-inch pipe sewer and 715 linear feet of 42-inch concrete sewer. Charles 
J. Jacobs Company, Contract No. 67, for 1,305 linear feet 69-inch by 72-inch 
concrete sewer and 1,135 linear feet 72-inch by 48-inch reinforced concrete 
sewer. 

This section extends westerly through Washington Street from a 
point about 200 feet east of Lake Street to !N"onantum Street, at Oak 
Square, — a distance of 2,440 linear feet. 

A portion of this section of the Metropolitan Sewer is located 
so near the surface as to interfere with some of the local sewers 
of the city of Boston. On this account it was necessary to construct 
a sewer on either side of Washington Street, for a portion of the 
length of this section, for the use of the city of Boston. 

At Lake Street a 36-inch by 38%-inch city sewer crossed the line 
of the proposed Metropolitan Sewer. To avoid interfering with the 
city sewer a new 42-inch concrete sewer was laid, at a lower and 
flatter grade, from Lake Street to Fairbanks Street, on the northerly 



156 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

side of Washington Street. The roof of the Metropolitan Sewer, 
crossing low territory above Lake Street to near Oak Square, is at 
such an elevation as to cut off house connections with local sewers on 
the southerly side of Washington Street. A 12-inch pipe sewer was 
built south of the Metropolitan Sewer for a length of 1,650 feet. 

A contract for the construction of these relief sewers was made 
with Glenn & Broderick on June 24, 1908. Work was started on 
the 12-inch pipe sewer on June 30 and finished on July 29. The 
construction of the 42-inch sewer was started on July 31 and finished 
on December 21. The excavation of the trench for the 12-inch pipe 
was in sand and gravel, with clay, for a few hundred feet west of 
Brackett Street. The average cut was about 10 feet for the 12-inch 
pipe and 18 feet for the concrete sewer, and very little water was 
encountered. The 42-inch sewer was carried under the invert of 
the Metropolitan Sewer at Lake Street by two 24-inch cast-iron 
pipes surrounded by concrete. The walls of the concrete sewer were 
of 8-inch Portland concrete. . House branches were built into both 
sewers about 25 feet apart. 

A contract for the construction of the main sewer for this section 
was made with the Charles J. Jacobs Company on August 4, 1908. 
This was for 1,305 linear feet of 69-inch by 72-inch Portland con- 
crete sewer, with minimum thickness of masonry 12 inches, and 
1,135 linear feet of 72-inch by 48-inch sewer, with Portland concrete 
invert and 8-inch brick arch, covered with 6 inches of Portland 
concrete. 

This latter section extends from a point about 400 feet east of 
Fairbanks Street to Brackett Street. The top of the sewer is from 
3 to 4 feet below the street surface. The masonry is reinforced with 
%-inch twisted steel bars. 

The average cut for the whole contract was about 14 feet. The 
excavation was in sand, gravel and clay, with rock in the bottom for 
about 100 feet near the beginning of the contract; above this rock 
many large boulders were found. 

Work on this contract was started at Nonantum Street, Oak 
Square, on August 11, and continued easterly to a point about 200 
feet east of Fairbanks Street, and was finished on November 18. A 
second opening was started about 200 feet east of Fairbanks Street 
on October 9 and continued easterly. On January 1 the work re- 
maining comprised about 70 linear feet of trench excavation and 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 157 

the placing of the masonry for a length of 113 feet. Very little 
water has been encountered. A hand pump has been used for short 
distances at different parts of the work. 

MAINTENANCE. 

Scope of Work aisd Eorce employed. 

The maintenance of the Metropolitan Sewerage System includes 
the operation of 7 stations and 101.35 miles of Metropolitan sewers, 
receiving the discharge from 1,132.36 miles of town and city sewers 
at 340 points, together with the care and study of inverted siphons 
under streams and in the harbor. 

The permanent maintenance force of 145 men includes 87 en- 
gineers and other employes at the pumping stations, and 58 men 
employed on actual sewer maintenance and care of pumping station 
grounds. In the following three tables the use of the completed 
systems and other data are shown : — 



158 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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160 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



161 



CAPACITY AND RESULTS. 

The following tables summarize the pumping records for the year 
for the Metropolitan sewerage stations : — 



North Metropolitan System. 

Deer Island Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 
Average duty for the year: 50,800,000 foot-pounds. 
Average quantity raised each day: 59,800,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 
Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4.15 to $4.98 per gross ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Deer Island Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons) . 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet) . 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1908 

January, . 






2,468,900,000 


79,600,000 


58,900,000 


105,000,000 


11.02 


56,800,000 


February, 




• 


2,470,000,000 


85,200,000 


65,300,000 


109,900,000 


11.26 


52,500,000 


March, 




• 


2,405,200,000 


77,600,000 


64,200,000 


107,400,000 


11.01 


54,600,000 


April, 






2,013,000,0001 


67,100,0001 


60,300,0001 


71,000,0001 


10.35 l 


52,600,000 l 


May, 




• 


1,852,500,000 


59,800,000 


47,000,000 


83,400,000 


10.61 


55,600,000 


June, 




• 


1,619,400,000 


54,000,000 


48,000,000 


64,500,000 


10.16 


51,100,000 


July, 




• 


1,565,300,000 


50,500,000 


42,600,000 


75,500,000 


10.16 


49,700,000 


August, . 






1,615,000,000 


52,100,000 


42,300,000 


74,300,000 


10.41 


50,900,000 


Septembei', 






1,489,700,000 


49,700,000 


41,800,000 


63,600,000 


10.16 


50,700,000 


October, . 




• 


1,480,700,000 


47,800,000 


38,800,000 


96,000,000 


10.44 


45,000,000 


November, 






1,324,700,000 


44,100,000 


36,600,000 


55,600,000 


10.31 


44,700,000 


December, 




• 


1,555,300,000 


50,200,000 


37,800,000 


75,200,000 


10.14 


45,300,000 


Total, 


21,859,700,000 


- 


- 




- 


- 


Average, 




• 


- 


59,800,000 


48,600,000 


81,800,000 


10.50 


50,800,000 



1 Approximate only. On account of the Chelsea fire the pumping service of this station was 
largely reduced from April 12 to 26. The quantities, lift and duty for the month of April have 
been estimated. 



162 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



East Boston Pumping Station. 
At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, with im- 
pellers or wheels 8.25 feet in diameter, driven by triple-expansion 
engines of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 45,000,000 gallons each, with 19-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 50,000,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 57,800,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen, 1 relief screenman 

and 3 helpers. 
Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.69 to $4.98 per gross ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the East Boston Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1908 

January, . 


• 


2,406,900,000 


77,600,000 


56,900,000 


103,000,000 


17.00 


56,500,000 


February, 






2,412,000,000 


83,200,000 


63,300,000 


107,900,000 


17.11 


54,700,000 


March, 






2,343,200,000 


75,600,000 


62,200,000 


105,400,000 


17.10 


57,700,000 


April, 






1,953,000,0001 


65,100,0001 


58,300,0001 


69,000,0001 


16.821 


- 


May, 






1,790,500,000 


57,800,000 


45,000,000 


81,400,000 


14.07 


- 


June, 






1,559,400,000 


52,000,000 


46,000,000 


62,500,000 


15.25 


- 


July, 






1,503,300,000 


48,500,000 


40,600,000 


73,500,000 


15.42 


48,900,000 


August, . 






1,553,000,000 


50,100,000 


40,300,000 


72,300,000 


15.13 


46,200,000 


September, 






1,429,700,000 


47,700,000 


39,800,000 


61,600,000 


15.46 


46,000,000 


October, . 






1,418,700,000 


45,800,000 


36,800,000 


94,000,000 


15.65 


50,200,000 


November, 






1,264,700,000 


42,100,000 


34,600,000 


53,600,000 


15.46 


44,100,000 


December, 






1,493,300,000 


48,200,000 


35,800,000 


73,200,000 


15.47 


45,800,000 


Total, 


21,127,700,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


57,800,000 


46,600,000 


79,S00,000 


15.83 


50,000,000 



i Approximate only. On account of the Chelsea fire the pumping at this station was abandoned 
from April 12 to 26. The quantities, lift and duty for the month of April have been estimated. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



163 



Charlestown Pumping Station. 

At this station are three submerged centrifugal pumps, two of 
them having impellers or wheels 7.5 feet in diameter, the other 
8.25 feet in diameter. They are driven by triple-expansion engines 
of the Reynolds-Corliss type. 

Contract capacity of pumps: two, 22,000,000 gallons each, with 11-foot lift; one, 
60,000,000 gallons, with 8-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 52,200,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 31,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 3 oilers, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3,815 to $4.98 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Charlestown Pumping 
Station of the North Metropolitan System. 



Months, 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 
Lift 

(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft. -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal) . 


1908 

January, . 






1,088,800,000 


35,100,000 


28,100,000 


46,200,000 


8.34 


55,200,000 


February, 






1,154,400,000 


39,800,000 


32,100,000 


53,400,000 


8.52 


62,400,000 


March, 






1,093,600,000 


35,300,000 


30,700,000 


49,100,000 


8.35 


60,500,000 


April, 






915,000,0001 


30,500,0001 


19,800,0001 


38,300,0001 


8.161 


62,000,0001 


May, 






982,300,000 


31,700,000 


22,300,000 


49,600,000 


7.86 


50,400,000 


June, 






945,300,000 


31,500,000 


28,300,000 


37,700,000 


8.14 


57,400,000 


July, 






1,021,700,000 


33,000,000 


27,200,000 


43,900,000 


8.20 


57,700,000 


August, . 






1,012,000,000 


32,600,000 


26,500,000 


46,900,000 


8.18 


51,900,000 


September, 






853,600,000 


28,500,000 


24,100,000 


40,700,000 


7.98 


46,900,000 


October, . 






831,100,000 


26,800,000 


19,600,000 


51,000,000 


8.11 


40,900,000 


November, 






713,600,000 


23,800,000 


19,100,000 


31,200,000 


7.92 


39,800,000 


December, 






848,900,000 


27,400,000 


21,600,000 


41,000,000 


8.01 


41,600,000 


Total, 


11,460,300,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


31,300,000 


25,000,000 


44,100,000 


8.15 


52,200,000 



i Approximate only. On account of the Chelsea fire the pumping service at this station was 
abandoned from April 12 to 17. The quantities, life and duty for the month of April have been 
estimated. 



164 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Alewife Brook Pumping Station. 
The plant at this station consists of the original installation of 
small commercial pumps and engines, i.e., two 9-inch Andrews verti- 
cal centrifugal pumps, with direct-connected compound marine en- 
gines, together with the recent additions. The latter consists of a, 
specially designed engine of the vertical cross-compound type, hav- 
ing between the cylinders a centrifugal pump rotating on a horizontal 
axis. 

Contract capacity of the two original pumps: 4,500,000 gallons each, with 13-foot 
lift. 

Contract capacity of new pump: 13,000,000 gallons, with 13-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 17,100,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,627,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 2 screenmen, and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $3.75 to $4.90 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, 
Station of the 



Lifts and Duties at the Alewife Brook Pumping 
North Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 

(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 

(Gallons). 


Minimum 
Day 

(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1908. 
January, .... 


189,592,000 


6,116,000 


4,983,000 


7,757,000 


12.84 


24,400,000 


February, 






177,310,000 


6,118,000 


4,922,000 


8,406,000 


12.64 


24,600,000 


March, 






197,848,000 


6,382,000 


5,494,000 


8,347,000 


12.76 


27,700,000 


April, 






116,195,000 


3,873,000 


2,414,000 


6,141,000 


12.53 


18,800,000 


May, 






127,628,000 


4,117,000 


3,229,000 


7,5SO,000 


12.48 


19,200,000 


June, 






93,649,000 


3,122,000 


2,550,000 


3,814,000 


12.92 


15,900,000 


July, 






80,089,000 


2,584,000 


2,078,000 


4,493,000 


13.16 


13,500,000 


August, . 






79,03S,000 


2,550,000 


1,994,000 


4,260,000 


13.10 


13,400,000 


September, 






62,581,000 


2,086,000 


1,826,000 


3,330,000 


13.03 


11,300,000 


October, . 






69,273,000 


2,235,000 


1,826,000 


4,799,000 


12.97 


11,900,000 


November, 






57,286,000 


1,910,000 


1,700,000 


2,739,000 


13.04 


10,500,000 


December, 






75,231,000 


2,427,000 


1,544,000 


4,260,000 


13.02 


13,700,000 


Total, 


1,325,720,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


3,627,000 


2,880,000 


5,494,000 


12.87 


17,100,000 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



165 



South Metropolitan System. 
Ward Street Pumping Station. 

At this station are two vertical, triple-expansion pumping en- 
gines, of the Allis-Chalmers type, operating reciprocating pumps, 
the plungers of which are 48 inches in diameter with a 60-inch 
stroke. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 50,000,000 gallons each, with 45-foot lift. 

Average duty for the year: 79,600,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 22,300,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 4 engineers, 4 firemen, 4 oilers, 4 assistant engineers, 1 machinist 

and 1 laborer. 
Coal used: first quality Cumberland, costing from $4.41 to $5.00 per gross ton. 



Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Ward Street Pumping 
Station of the South Metropolitan System. 



Months. 


Total 
Pumpage 
(Gallons). 


Average 
per Day 
(Gallons). 


Minimum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Maximum 

Day 
(Gallons). 


Average 

Lift 
(Feet). 


Average 

Duty (ft.-lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


1908 

January, . 






1,011,500,000 


32,700,000 


24,600,000 


43,600,000 


41.83 


93,000,000 


February, 






812,000,000 


28,000,000 


22,300,000 


41,000,000 


41.93 


84,000,000 


March, 






935,300,000 


30,200,000 


26,700,000 


42,400,000 


41.54 


88,600,000 


April, 






786,400,000 


26,200,000 


18,700,000 


30,300,000 


41.48 


81,700,000 


May, 






774,700,000 


25,000,000 


21,500,000 


29,200,000 


41.27 


83,000,000 


June, 






633,500,000 


21,100,000 


18,000,000 


25,600,000 


40.62 


82,000,000 


July, 






405,600,000 


18,400,000 


15,700,000 


32,600,000 


40.11 


77,400,000 


August, . 






576,900,000 


18,600,000 


15,600,000 


28,900,000 


40.06 


75,600,000 


September, 






510,000,000 


17,000,000 


14,900,000 


22,100,000 


39.86 


67,800,000 


October, . 






519,400,000 


16,800,000 


13,100,000 


29,100,000 


40.06 


73,100,000 


November, 






484,600,000 


16,200,000 


14,600,000 


21,300,000 


39.91 


74,600,000 


December, 






532,400,000 


17,200,000 


15,000,000 


27,000,000 


40.08 


74,400,000 


Total, 


7,982,300,000 


- , 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, 






- 


22,300,000 


18,400,000 


31,100,000 


40.73 


79,600,000 



Records from plunger displacement. 
Average slip for the year about 17.6 per cent. 



166 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Quincy Pumping Station. 
At this station are two compound condensing Deane pumping 
engines and one Lawrence centrifugal pump driven by a Sturtevant 
compound condensing engine. 

Contract capacity of pumps: 3,000,000 Deane; 5,000,000 Deane; 10,000,000 Law- 
rence centrifugal. 

Average duty for the year: 33,500,000 foot-pounds. 

Average quantity raised each day: 3,687,000 gallons. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 2 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4,415 to $5.25 per gross ton. 

Table of Approximate Quantities, Lifts and Duties at the Quincy Pumping Station 

of the South Metropolitan System. 







Total 


Average 


Minimum 


Maximum 


Average 


Average 

Duty (ft, -lbs. 

per 100 lbs. 

Coal). 


Months. 


Pumpage 


per Day 


Day 


Day 


Lift 




(Gallons). 


(Gallons). 


(Gallons). 


(Gallons). 


(Feet) . 


1908. 














January, .... 


139,923,000 


4,514,000 


3,860,000 


5,361,000 


21.06 


28,600,000 


February, 


123,327,000 


4,253,000 


3,780,000 


4,700,000 


21.04 


31,100,000 


March 


131,193,000 


4,232,000 


3,950,000 


4,510,000 


21.05 


32,800,000 


April, .... 


121,498,000 


4,050,000 


3,710,000 


4,500,000 


21.05 


37,000,000 


May, .... 


115,384,000 


3,722,000 


3,460,000 


4,220,000 


21.05 


36,100,000 


June, .... 


98,380,000 


3,279,000 


2,800,000 


3,645,000 


21.05 


34,400,000 


July, 


97,060,000 


3,131,000 


2,660,000 


3,620,000 


21.04 


34,100,000 


August, .... 


103,996,000 


3,355,000 


2,980,000 


3,765,000 


20.99 


33,200,000 


September, 


97,388,000 


3,246,000 


2,770,000 


3,700,000 


20.99 


34,500,000 


October, . . ■ . 


105,763,000 


3,412,000 


2,910,000 


4,090,000 


21.05 


33,200,000 


November, 


104,830,000 


3,494,000 


3,210,000 


3,840,000 


21.03 


33,600,000 


December, 


110,369,000 


3,560,000 


3,200,000 


3,885,000 


21.06 


32,900,000 


Total, 


1,349,111,000 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Average, . 


- 


3,687,000 


3,274,000 


4,153,000 


21.04 


33,500,000 



Nut Island Screen House. 

The plant at this house includes two sets of screens in duplicate, 
actuated by small reversing engines of the Fitchburg type. Two ver- 
tical Deane boilers, 80 horse-power each, operate the engines, pro- 
vide heat for the house and burn materials intercepted at the screens. 

Average quantity of sewage passing screens daily, 37,800,000 gallons. 

Total materials intercepted at screens during the past year, 941.2 cubic yards. 

Materials intercepted per million gallons of sewage discharge, 1.84 cubic feet. 

Force employed: 3 engineers, 1 relief engineer, 3 screenmen and 1 relief screen- 
man. 

Coal used: 353.9 tons first-quality Cumberland, costing from $4,215 to $4.98 per 
gross ton. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD, 



167 



Cost of Pumping. 
In the following tables the total cost of pumping and the rate per 
million foot-gallons at each of six pumping stations are shown in 
detail : — 

Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Deer Island Station. 

Volume (21,859.7 Million Gallons) x Lift (10.50 Feet) = 229,527 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, ....... 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens 



$11,232 61 

10,154 77 

177 41 

81 55 

1,190 40 

133 21 

1,480 84 



$24,450 79 



$0.04894 
.04424 
.00077 
.00036 
.00519 
.00058 
.00645 



$0.10653 
.01359 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the East Boston Station. 

Volume (21,127.7 Million Gallons) x Lift (15.83 Feet) = 334,451 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, ....... 

Water, 

Packing, . . . . . 
Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, 



$14,715 23 

11,618 82 

377 28 

143 79 

2,226 00 

497 40 

1,915 92 



$31,494 44 



$0.04400 
.03474 
.00113 
.00043 
.00666 
.00149 
.00573 



$0.09418 
.00933 



168 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Charlestown Station. 

Volume (11,460.3 Million Gallons) x Lift 8.15 Feet) = 93,401 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal 

Oil 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens 



$11,340 77 
4,006 65 
171 33 
102 06 
494 40 
61 79 
621 43 



$16,798 43 



). 12142 
.04289 
.00183 
.00109 
.00529 
.00066 
.00665 



S0.179S3 
.03062 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Alewife Brook Station. 

Volume (1,325.72 Million Gallons) x Lift (12.87 Feet) = 17,062 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, 

Oil 

Waste, 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals, 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



$5,491 96 

1,845 22 

115 10 

47 88 

181 56 

68 68 

205 14 



$7,955 54 



$0.3218S 
.10814 
.00674 
.00281 
.01064 
.00403 
.01202 



$0.46626 
.10667 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Ward Street Station. 

Volume (7,982.3 Million Gallons) x Lift (40.73 Feet) =325,119 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor 

Coal, 

Oil, 

Waste, 

Water, . . . . . 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens 



$14,536 16 

8,662 22 

256 17 

51 5S 

1,357 20 

335 77 

1,879 00 



$27,078 10 



$0.04471 
.02664 
.00079 
.00016 
.00417 
.00103 
.00578 



$0.08328 
.01344 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



169 



Average Cost per Million Foot-gallons for Pumping at the Quincy Station. 

Volume (1,349.1 Million Gallons) x Lift (21.04 Feet) =28,385 Million Foot-gallons. 



Items. 



Cost. 



Cost 

per Million 

Foot-gallons. 



Labor, 

Coal, .......... 

Oil,. . • 

Waste 

Water, 

Packing, 

Miscellaneous supplies and renewals, 

Totals 

Labor at screens, oiling and miscellaneous services, 



54,783 08 

1,575 02 

31 69 

11 03 

199 38 

85 11 

188 13 



5,873 44 



.16852 
.05549 
.00112 
.00039 
.00702 
.00300 
.00663 



.24217 

.05496 



Coal for use at the several stations has been purchased as follows : 





Gross Tons, Bituminous Coal. 


Con- 




Deer 

Island 

Pumping 

Station. 


East Charles- 
Boston town 
Pumping , Pumping 
Station. Station. 


Alewife 

Brook 

Pumping 

Station. 


Ward 

Street 

Pumping 

Station. 


Quincy 
Pumping 
Station. 


Nut 
Island 
Screen 
House. 


tract 
Price 
per 
Gross 
Ton. 


Davis Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Davis Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Metropolitan Coal Com- 
pany. 
Davis Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Davis Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Davis Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Davis Coal and Coke 

Company. 
Locke Coal Company, . 

Metropolitan Coal Com- 
pany. 

Metropolitan Coal Com- 
pany. 

Locke Coal Company, . 

George E. Frost & Co., 

Metropolitan Coal Com- 
pany. 

Metropolitan Coal Com- 
pany. 

George E. Frost & Co., 


870.00 

138.75 
1,449.00 


1,111.110 

167.205 
1,516.301 


484.220 
66.517 

231.428 


149.759 
313.499 


802.110 
1,084.239 


124.50 

76.584 
206.870 


233 

200 


$3.69 
3.95 
4.10 
4.15 
4.20 
4.41 
4.45 
4.50 
4.60 
4.75 
4.90 
4.95 
4.98 
5.00 
5.25 


Total gross tons, 

Average price per 
gross ton. 


2,457.75 
$4.66 


2,794.616 

$4.45 


782.165 

$4.27 


463.258 

$4.77 


1,886.349 

$4.75 


407.954 

$4.95 


433 
$4.56 


- 



170 MET. WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. [P. D. 57. 

Change of Pipes at Alewife Brook Puaipixg Station. 

This station is located on the easterly bank of Alewife Brook in 
Somerville. The overflow from the suction sewer entering the sta- 
tion leads to this brook. Condensing water for use in the engine 
room is taken from the brook and the discharge from condensers is 
led back to the brook. 

The Metropolitan Park Commission have, during the year, modi- 
fied the location of this brook passing this station. The overflow 
from the sewer and condensing pipes has been extended to the modi- 
fied lines of this brook. This has involved placing 250 feet of 24- 
inch cast-iron pipe and 280 feet of 8-inch cast-iron pipe. This work 
has been carried out by day labor under direction of the Engineer. 

South Metropolitan Outfaees. 
The 60-inch outlet pipes in the harbor have been in operation 
four years at the date of this report. These pipes are in normal con- 
dition and free from deposit. During the past year the average flow 
through them has been 37,800,000 gallons of sewage per day, with a 
maximum rate of 107,000,000 gallons in the month of January, 
1908. 

Material intercepted at the Screens. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the Xorth Metropolitan 
sewerage stations, consisting of rags, paper and other floating mat- 
ters, has during the year amounted to 2,301.3 cubic yards. This 
is equivalent to 2.8 cubic feet for each million gallons of sewage 
pumped at Deer Island. 

The material intercepted at the screens at the South Metropolitan 
sewerage stations has amounted to 2,222.7 cubic yards, equal to 4.3 
cubic feet per million gallons of sewage delivered at the outfall 
works at Xut Island. 

Studies of sewage flows in the Metropolitan sewers, siphons and 
outfall pipes indicate that they are free from deposit. 

Respectfully submitted, 

WM. M. BROWX, 

Chief Engineer of Sewerage Works. 
Boston, January l. 1'. 



APPENDIX. 



172 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 1. 



Contracts made and pending during 

[Note. —The details of contracts made before 



1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



2881 



298 1 



299 



301 



304 



10-M.i 
11-M. 

12-M. 

13-M.i 



WORK. 



Pumping engine for the 
Arlington station. 

Pumping engine for the 
Arlington station. 



4,160 tons cast iron water 
pipes; 4,100 tons 48-inch, 
60 tons 36-inch, 130 tons 
special castings. 

18 water valves ; 10 36-inch, 
8 12-inch. 

Laying water pipes in 
Boston and Brookline, 
Section 31 of the distri- 
bution system. 



Placing riprap at North 
Dike, Clinton, Mass. 

6,000 tons Vulcan coal for 
Chestnut Hill pumping 
station. 

1,300 tons Davis coal; 900 
tons for Spot Pond 
pumping station, 400 
tons for Arlington 
pumping station. 

Steel standards for flash- 
boards for waste- weir of 
Waehusett Dam. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



11 



10 



Amount of Bid. 



Next to Low- 
est. 



$7,900 00 
12,700 00 

103,831 00 

7,240 00 
36,157 50 



19,250 00 



;.85 per 
ton. 



$4.50 and 

$4.10 per 

ton. 



$972 00 



Lowest. 



$7,830 00 
5,240 00 2 

99,164 00 2 

7,124 00 2 
32,791 00 



14,000 00 2 



$3,75 2 and 

$3.85 per 
ton. 

$4,192 and 

$3.95 per 

ton. 



70 03 2 



Contractor. 



Allis-Chalmers Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

The Blake & Knowles 
Steam Pump 
Works, Boston. 

Warren Foundry and 
Machine Co , Phil- 
lipsburg, N. J. 

Coffin Valve Com- 
pany, Boston. 

Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 



Hugh Nawn Contract 
ing Co., Boston. 

Spring Coal Co., Bos- 
ton. 



Davis Coal and Coke 
Co., Boston. 



New England Struc- 
tural Co., Boston. 



1 Contract completed. 



2 Contract based upon this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



173 



Appendix No. 1. 



the Yeah 1908 — Water Works. 

1908 have been given in previous reports.] 



7. 



Date 
of Contract. 



Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1908. 



10. 

Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1908. 



Oct. 28, '05, 
April 3, '07, 

Aug. 1, '08, 

Aug. 26, '08, 
Sept. 5, '08, 



Sept. 6, '07, 



July 1, '08, 



July 13, '08, 



Aug. 15, '08, 



Oct. 30, '08, 



Jan. 17, '08, 



Nov. 6, '08, 



Duty trials completed Jan. 7, 1909, 



Cast-iron pipe $22.40, special castings $46 per 
ton of 2,000 lbs. delivered at Brookline, Mass. 



36-inch valves, $650; 12-inch valves, $78, 



For laying cast-iron pipe : 48-inch, $2.60 per lin. 
ft.; 36- inch. $2 per lin. ft.; 12-inch for blow- 
offs, $1 per lin. ft.; for rock excavation above 
regular grade, $3.25 per cu. yd.; for rock ex- 
cavation below regular grade, $4 per cu. yd.; 
for earth excavation below regular grade, $1 .50 
per cu. yd.; for setting air valves,"$2.50 each; 
for chambers for 36-inch valves, $50 each ; for 
chambers for blow-offs, by passes or air valves, 
$35 each; for concrete masonry, $7 per cu. yd. 



3.75 to Oct. 1, $3.85 Oct. 1 to June 1 per ton of 
2,240 lbs. delivered on cars at Chestnut Hill 
pumping station. 

4.19 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at the 
Spot Pond pumping station; $3.95 per ton of 
2,240 lbs. delivered on cars at the Arlington 
pumping station. 



.67 each, 



$8,375 37 
5,240 00 

56,000 00 

1,612 00 
10,870 23 



14,083 00 
12,573 83 

3,746 78 
893 53 



$113,394 74 



174 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1908 — Water Works — 

Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 1 



Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1908. 



Distribution Department, 5 contracts, 

291 contracts completed from 1896 to 1907, inclusive 

Deduct for work done on 11 Sudbury Reservoir contracts by the City of Boston, . 
Total of 307 contracts, 

i In this summary, contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



$82,097 60 
15,825,335 85 



$15,907,433 45 
512,000 00 



$15,395,433 45 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



175 



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176 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 2. — Rainfall in Inches at Jefferson, Mass., in 1908. 



Day of Month. 


>> 
u 

a 

eg 


>> 

eg 

PR 


.£5 
O 
(-1 
cS 

8 


'G 

P< 

< 


>> 

03 

8 


6 

S3 
3 


1-5 


IS 

bo 

< 


u 


a 

CO 
Pi 


C 

O 
O 
O 


u 

$ 

CD 
> 
O 


u 

CD 

a 
® 

m 
Q 


1, ■ . . . 






- 


0.88 3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2, . . . 






- 


- 


0.92 * 


0.193 


0.34 


- 


- 


- 


_ 


0.13 


- 


- 


o, . 

4, . . . 






0.15 3 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.84 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.17 3 


5, . . . 






- 


- 


- 


0.34 


- 


- 


- 


0.86 


- 


- 


- 


- 


6, . . . 






- 


0.493 


0.323 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.18 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


7, . . . 






2 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.28 


- 


- 


- 


1.583 


8, . . 






1.21 


- 


0.07 


2 


1.54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.19 


- 


9, . . . 






- 


- 


- 


0.55 


0.18 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10, . . . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


11, • . 






- 


- 


- 


0.12 


- 


- 


- 


0.32 


- 


0.35 


0.15 


2 


12, . . 






2 


- 


- 


- 


0.08 


- 


0.20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.483 


13, . . 






1.29 


0.10 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


- 


1.69 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14, . . 






- 


2 


- 


- 


0.34 


- 


0.42 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


15, . . 






- 


1.14 


0.20 


0.47 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.623 


0.213 


16, . . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.68 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, . . 






- 


- 


2 


- 


. - 


- 


0.18 


0.68 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18, . . 






- 


- 


2 


0.38 


- 


- 


0.33 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.23 1 


19, . . 






- 


1.243 


0.843 


- 


- 


- 


0.39 


- 


- 


- 


0.19i 


- 


20, . . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


21, . . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


• - 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22, . 








- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


0.29 


0.44 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, . 






2 


0.05' 


0.24 


- 


0.43 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, . . 






0.50 1 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.73 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


25, . . 






- 


- 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


1.45 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


26, . . 






- 


1.233 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


- 


1.04 


- 


0.45 


0.12 


- 


27, . • 






0.51 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


28, . 






- 


- 


0.09 


0.10 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


0.46 


! - 


- 


29, . . 






0.14 1 


- 


0.42 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.10 


- 




- 


30, . 






- 


- 


- 


0.84 


2.54 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.76 


- 


2 


31, . . 






- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.50 


Total, 


3.80 


5.13 


3.10 


3.14 


5.52 


1.41 


4.10 


6.49 


1.21 


2.15 


1.27 


3.17 



1 Snow. 



Total for the year 40.49 inches. 
2 Rainfall included in that of following day. 



3 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



177 



Table No. 3. — Rainfall in Inches at Framingham, Mass., in 1908. 



Day of Month. 


>> 

u 
(A 

a 
a 


u 
eS 

u 

to 


o 
u 
eg 


'u 

ft 

< 




2 


3 

1-9 


-*9 
00 

S3 
60 

< 


C 

ft 


u 
s> 
,o 
o 

o 

O 


1 

IS 

> 
o 


u 
<o 

a 

o 

<0 

Q 


1, • 








- 


0.82 s 


0.39 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


- 


2, • 

3, . 

4, • 








- 


- 


Q.40 3 


0.15 3 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.24 


- 


- 








0.06 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.17 


0.39 


- 


- 


- 


2 


5, . 








- 


2 


- 


0.14 


- 


- 


- 


0.64 


- 


- 


- 


0.08 


6, . 








- 


0.24 3 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.62 


0.18 


- 


- 


2 


7, • 








1.26 


- 


0.42 ' 


- 


2 


- 


- 


0.46 


- 


- 


- 


1.623 


8, . 








- 


- 


2 


0.47 


1.77 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


9, . 








- 


- 


0.09 


- 


0.01 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


10, . 








- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


11, . 








- 


- 


- 


0.05 


- 


- 


- 


0.07 


- 


0.24 


0.15 


2 


12, . 








2 


- 


- 


- 


0.04 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.57 3 


13, . 








0.96 


0.14 


0.08 


0.02 


2 


- 


- 


0.11 


- 


- 


- 


- 


14, . 








- 


2 


- 


- 


0.40 


- 


0.16 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


15, . 








- 


0.71 


0.24 


0.31 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.45 


0.04 


16, . 








0.03 


- 


0.02 


- 


0.01 


0.45 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


17, . 








- 


- 


0.13 1 


- 


- 


- 


0.11 


0.48 


- 


- 


- 


- 


18, . . 








- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


0.53 


- 


- 


- 


0.06 3 


0.24 3 


19, . . 








- 


1.383 


0.87 3 


0.23 


- 


- 


0.03 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


20, . 








- 


- 


- 


0.023 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


21, . . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


0.08 


- 


2 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


22, . 








- 


- 


- 


- 


1.18 


- 


0.75 


0.22 


- 


- 


- 


- 


23, . . 








2 


0.14! 


0.18 


- 


- 


0.08 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


24, . . 








0.351 


- 


- 


- 


- 


0.19 


0.28 


- 


- 


- 


2 


- 


25, . . 








- 


0.22 3 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


1.40 


2 


- 


2 


2 


- 


26, . . 








2 


2 


- 


- 


0.01 


- " 


- 


1.37 


- 


0.70 


0.15 


- 


27, . . 








0.453 


0.57 


2 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


28, . . 








2 


- 


0.02 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


- 


2 


2 


- 


- 


29, . . 








0.10 1 


- 


0.82 


- 


- 


0.02 


- 


- 


0.78 


2 


0.02 


- 


30, . 








-- 


- 


- 


0.30 


1.72 


- 


- 


- 


- 


1.34 


0.02 


0.40 


31, . . 








0.03 1 


- 


0.0L 


- 


0.13 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


- 


Total, 




3.24 


4.22 


3.67 


1.75 


5.41 


0.74 


3.43 


4.36 


0.96 


2.52 


0.89 


2.95 



Total for the year 34.14 inches. 
1 Snow. 2 Rainfall included in that of the following day. 3 Rain and snow. 



178 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1908. 



Date. 



Jan. 7, 
Jan. 8, 
Jan. 12, 
Jan. 13, 
Jan. 16, 
Jan. 23, 
Jan. 24, 
Jan. 24, 
Jan. 26, 
Jan. 27, 
Jan. 29, 

Total, 



Feb. 1, . 

Feb. 5, . 

Feb. 6, . 

Feb. 13, . 

Feb. 14, . 

Feb. 15, . 

Feb. 15, . 

Feb. 19, . 

Feb. 20, . 

Feb. 23, . 

Feb. 24, . 

Feb. 26, . 

Feb. 27, . 

Total, 



1, 

3, 

6, 
7, 
8, 
% 
13, 



Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 
Mar. 14, 
Mar. 15, . 
Mar. 17, . 
Mar. 18, . 
Mar. 19, . 
Mar. 23, . 
Mar. 24, . 
Mar. 29, . 

Total, 



9, 



Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr 
Apr. 

Apr. 10, . 
Apr. 14, . 
Apr. 15, . 
Apr. 18, . 
Apr. 19, . 
Apr. 19, . 
Apr. 20, . 
Apr. 25, . 
Apr. 26, . 
Apr. 28, . 
Apr. 30, . 
May 1, . 

Total, 



Amount. 



1.85 

1.18 

.02 

.611 

.091 

.54 

.212 

4.50 



Duration. 



2.55 P.M. to 

4.40 A.M. 
7.45 A.M. to 

5.25 A.M. 
9.30 A.M. to 12.15 P.M. 
7.30 P.M. to 

2.00 P.M. 
6.15 P.M. to 11.00 P.M. 
10.15 P.M. to 

6.25 A.M. 
12.15 A.M. to 4.45 P.M. 



1.54 2 

.541 
.27 
.18 
• 72 
1.93 2 

.111 

.93 

6.22 



.96 2 
.55 2 
.15 

.21 

.25 
.20 2 

.88 2 
.20 



4.18 



5.45 A.M. to 4.45 P.M. 
10.00 P.M. to 

9.45 P.M. 
6.30 A.M. to 8.00 P.M. 
10.00 P.M. to 

4.55 A.M. 
12.30 P.M. to 6.45 P.M. 
8.00 A.M. to 

1.20 A.M. 
8.00 P.M. to 

3.10 A.M. 

3.15 P.M. to 

3.00 P.M. 



5.15 P.M. to 

1.55 A.M. 
2.00 P.M. to 

1.25 A.M. 
6.30 P.M. to 

7.30 A.M. 
10.15 P.M. to 

2.40 A.M. 
3.50 P.M. to 8.00 P.M. 
1.30 P.M. to 6.00 P.M. 
1.00 P.M. to 

3.30 P.M. 
1.30 P.M. to 

1.15 A.M. 
9.45 A.M. to 8.00 P.M. 



.19 2 
.14 

.51 

.06 
.03 
.31 

.40 

.03 
.04 

.09 

.06 

.78 



2.64 



2.30 A.M. 

9.30 P.M. 

1.00 P.M. 

5.00 P.M. 
8.55 A.M. 
1.00 P.M. 
4.30 P.M. 

1.15 P.M. 

1.15 P.M. 

11.45 P.M. 

2.40 A.M. 
9.30 P.M. 



to 

11.30 A.M. 

to 

3.55 A.M. 
to 

2.15 A.M. 
to 10.00 P.M. 
to 11.55 A.M. 
to 11.30 P.M. 
to 

5.35 A. M. 
to 4.30 P.M. 
to 11.30 P.M. 
to 

12.30 A.M. 
to 6.30 A.M. 
to 

1.25 A.M. 



Date. 



May 7, . 

May 8, . 

May 9, . 

May 13, . 

May 14, . 

May 21, . 

May 22, . 

May 22, . 

May 23, . 

May 26, . 

May 27, . 

May 30, . 

May 31, . 

May 31, . 

Total, 



Total, 



July 4, . 

July 14, . 

July 15, . 

July 18, . 

July 18, . 

July 19, . 

July 20, . 

July 22, . 

July 23, . 

July 24, . 

July 25, . 

July 26, . 

Total, 



Aug. 4, . 
Aug. 5, . 
Aug. 6, . 
Aug. 6, . 
Aug. 7, . 
Aug. 10, . 
Aug. 11, . 
Aug. 13, . 
Aug. 17, . 
Aug. 17, • 
Aug. 22, . 
Aug. 22, . 
Aug. 26, . 
Aug. 27, . 

Total, 



Sept. 6, . 
Sept. 27, . 
Sept. 28, . 

Total, 



Amount 



2.36 
.07 
.30 

.10 

.09 

.02 

1.30 
.32 



4.56 



Duration. 



2.30 P.M. to 

6.15 A.M. 
3.45 P.M. to 7.00 P.M. 
11.50 P.M. to 

4.00 P.M. 
3.00 P.M. to 

4.35 A.M. 
12.30 P.M. to 

4.45 A.M. 
11.45 P.M. to 

1.10 A.M. 
11.35 a.m. to 

12.15 A.M. 
7.30 P.M. to 11.15 P.M. 



June 16, . 


.78 


June 24, . 


.04 


June 24, . 


.25 


June 28, . 


.16 


June 30, . 


.05 



4.20 A.M. to 11.00 A.M. 
3.45 A.M. to 6.30 A.M. 
5.30 P.M. to 10.30 P.M. 
8.45 P.M. to 6.25 A.M. 
2.00 P.M. to 2.17 P.M. 



1.28 



.51 
.14 
.05 
.11 

.33 

.19 
.84 
.03 

.04 

1.94 



4.18 



1.05 P.M. 
5.00 P.M. 
6.30 P.M. 
2.30 P.M. 
11.10 P.M. 

12.30 A.M. 
12.20 A.M. 

1.10 A.M. 

9.45 A.M. 

6.30 A.M. 



.45 P.M. 
.00 P.M. 
.00 P.M. 
.00 P.M. 

.55 A.M. 
.55 A.M. 
.00 A.M. 
.35 A.M. 
.30 P.M. 



1.30 A.M. 



.29 
.38 
.20 
.25 
1.84 
.03 
.10 
.03 
.15 
.21 
.35 
.03 

1.70 



5.56 



5.40 A.M. 
2.05 A.M. 
12.30 A.M. 
3.30 P.M. 
1.35 P.M. 
8.00 P.M. 
5.30 P.M. 
8.30 P.M. 
6.10 A.M. 
7.50 p.m. 

6.00 A.M. 
12.30 P.M. 
12.25 A.M. 



to 8, 

to 8. 

to 1. 

to 9 

to 4 

to 8 

to 7 



00 A.M. 
45 A.M. 
00 a.m. 
30 P.M. 
30 P.M. 
40 P.M. 
55 P.M. 
10 A.M. 
30 P.M. 
45 P.M. 
35 A.M. 
25 P.M. 



to 10. 
to 8. 
to 1. 
to 

4.00 A.M. 



.13 

1.09 

1.22 



6.45 A.M. to 12.30 P.M. 
10.30 P.M. to 

6-40 A.M. 



i Snow. 



2 Rain and snow. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



179 



Table No. 4. — Rainfall in Inches at Chestnut Hill Reservoir in 1908 

Concluded. 



Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Date. 


Amount. 


Duration. 


Oct. 1, . 


J .68 


8.20 P.M. to 


Dec. 4, . 


.16 


3.30 P.M. to 9.30 P.M. 


Oct. 2, 




6.20 A.M. 


Dec. 6, . 


J 1.50 


11.45 P.M. to 


Oct. 10, 




j .20 


11.55 P.M. to 


Dec. 7, . 


5.00 P.M. 


Oct. 11, 




8.05 A.M. 


Dec. 11, . 


.73 2 


10.35 A.M. to 4.00 P.M. 


Oct. 26, 




1.42 


9.10 A.M. to 10.40 P.M. 


Dec. 12, . 


.212 


9.20 A.M. to 12.15 P.M. 


Oct. 28, 




J2.04 


6.00 P.M. to 


Dec. 15, . 


.16 


2.45 A.M. to 9.00 A.M. 


Oct. 30, 




11.10 A.M. 


Dec. 18, . 


.17 2 


6.45 A.M. to 6.30 P.M. 








Dec. 30, . 
Dec. 31, . 

Total, 


i 


6.30 P.M. to 

1.45 A.M. 


Total, 


4.34 




.53 




3.46 












Nov. 8, . 


.04 
J .02 


8.45 A.M. to 6.15 P.M. 
10.00 P.M. to 








Nov. 10, . 








Nov. 11, • 


7.00 A.M. 








Nov. 11, • 


j.ie 


2.05 P.M. to 








Nov. 12, . 


1.45 A.M. 








Nov. 14, . 


j .65 


8.10 P.M. to 








Nov. 15, . 


7.15 A.M. 








Nov. 18, . 


.08 


6.45 A.M. to 11.35 A.M. 








Nov. 19, • 


J.xo 


6.55 P.M. to 








Nov. 20, . 


4.40 A.M. 








Nov. 26, . 


.10 


9.30 P.M. to 11.55 P.M. 








Nov. 30, . 


.02 


10.00 P.M. to 11.35 P.M. 








Total 




1.17 





Total for the year 43.31 inches. 
2 Rain and snow. 



180 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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190 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 13. — Sources from which and Periods during which Water has been 
drawn for the Supply of the Metropolitan Water District. 

From Wachusett Reservoir into Sudbury Reservoir. 

12 : 30 p.m. Jan. 1 to 10 : 15 am. Jan. 5. 
11:30 a.m. Jan. 21 « 7 : 00 a.m. May 18. 
12 : 00 M. May 18 " 10 : 30 a.m. May 24. 

3 : 40 p.m. May 24 " 10 : 00 a.m. May 27. 

9 : 40 a M. May 28 " 1 : 00 p.m. Oct. 22. 

5 : 00 p.m. Oct. 28 " 8 : 00 a.m. Oct. 29. 

2 : 00 p.m. Nov. 14 " 9 : 00 p.m. Nov. 19. 

6 : 00 a.m. Dec. 5 " 8 : 30 a.m. Dec. 26. 
11 : 15 a m. Dec. 26 " 7 : 40 a.m. Dec. 28. 

12 : 15 p.m. Dec. 28 " 7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 1, 1909. 
Total quantity, 39,345,900,000 gallons. 

From Sudbury Reservoir through the Weston Aqueduct to the Weston Reservoir. 

7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 1 to 7 : 00 a.m. Mar. 24. 
9 : 00 a.m. Mar. 24 " 2 : 00 p.m. June 19. 

3 : 00 p.m. June 20 " 7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 1, 1909. 
Total quantity, 10,967,200,000 gallons. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 1 through Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir, 

December 3 and December 4. 
Total quantity, 3,300,000 gallons. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 8 through Sudbury Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 

7 : 00 a m. Jan. 1 to 11 : 00 p.m. Nov. 16. 

4 : 30 p.m. Nov. 20 " 9 : 00 p.m. Nov. 30. 

3 : 00 p.m. Dec. 4 " 7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 1, 1909. 
Total quantity, 34,497,700,000 gallons. 

From Lake Cochituate through Cochituate Aqueduct to Chestnut Hill Reservoir. 
7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 7 to 7 : 00 a.m. Jan. 15. 



12: 


:00 M. 


Feb. 1 


a 


7: 


: 00 a.m. Feb. 


23. 


11: 


:00 a.m. 


Feb. 24 


ei 


11 


: 00 a.m. Feb. 


26 


7: 


: 00 a.m. 


Mar. 2 


a 


5: 


: 00 p.m. Mar. 


2. 


7: 


: 00 A.M. 


Mar. 4 


ce 


7 


: 00 a.m. Mar. 


5, 


1: 


: 00 P.M. 


June 12 


«< 


11: 


00 a.m. July 


10, 


12 


:00 M. 


July 10 


i< 


11: 


00 a.m. July 


20. 


10: 


: 30 A.M. 


July 22 


K 


11: 


00 a.m. July 


25, 


11: 


: 00 A.M. 


July 28 


U 


11: 


00 am. July 


30, 


7: 


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Aug. 4 


» 


4: 


00 p.m. Aug. 


5. 


7: 


:00 a.m. 


Aug. 14 


K 


4: 


: 00 P M. Aug. 


15 


1: 


: 45 P.M. 


Sept. 25 


li 


4: 


: 00 p.m. Sept. 


27, 


11: 


: 00 A.M. 


Nov. 13 


C< 


4 


: 00 p.m. Nov. 


25 


11 


: 00 A.M. 


Nov. 27 


Ct 


10 


: 30 A.M. Nov. 


28 



7:00 a.m. Nov 30 " 7 : 00 A M. Dec. 5. 
Total quantity, 1,473,900,000 gallons. 

From Framingham Reservoir No. 3 through Sudbury Aqueduct to Lake Cochituate. 

2 : 05 a.m. Nov. 17 to 3 : 30 a.m. Nov. 17. 
Total quantity, 400,000 gallons. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



191 



Table No. 14. 



Average Daily Quantity of Water flowing through Aqueducts in 
1908 by Months} 



Month. 


Wachusett 
Aqueduct 
into Sudbury 
Reservoir 
(Gallons). 


Weston 
Aqueduct 
into Metro- 
politan District 
(Gallons) . 


Sudbury 

Aqueduct into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons). 


Cochituate » 

Aqueduct into 

Chestnut Hill 

Reservoir 

(Gallons). 


January, 








43,439,000 


30,332,000 


92,687,000 


4,023,000 


February, 








99,134,000 


29,734,000 


101,534,000 


12,469,000 


March, . 








101,426,000 


29,745,000 


94,071,000 


706,000 


April, . 








120,797,000 


29,917,000 


95,570,000 


- 


May, 








109,726,000 


30,110,000 


98,677,000 


- 


June, . 








124,440,000 


30,063,000 


99,123,000 


7,580,000 


July, . 








134,510,000 


29,706,000 


98,345,000 


11,129,000 


August, 








121,487,000 


29,558,000 


95,087,000 


1,039,000 


September, 








135,240,000 


29,930,000 


97,147,000 


707,000 


October, 








89,261,000 


29,706,000 


91,110,000 


- 


November, 








34,017,000 


30,300,000 


77,247,000 


8,347,000 


December, . 








175,513,000 


30,474,000 


90,794,000 


2,887,000 


Average, 




107,502,000 


29,965,000 


94,265,000 


4,027,000 



1 Not including quantities wasted while cleaning and repairing aqueducts. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



193 



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194 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



195 



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January, 

February, 

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April, 

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bo 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



197 



Table No. 20. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water during 
the Year 1908, in the Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water 
Works, including Boston, Somerville, Chelsea, Maiden, Everett, Quincy, 
Medford, Melrose, Revere, Watertown, Arlington, Lexington, Milton, Stone- 
ham, Winthrop, Swampscott, Belmont, Nahant and a Small Portion of Sau- 
gus. {For Consumption of Water in Whole Metropolitan Water District, see 
Table No. &£.) 





Average 




Consumption 


Month. 


Daily 


Estimated 


per 


Consumption 


Population. 


Inhabitant 




(Gallons). 




(Gallons). 


January, 


127,607,100 


941,890 


136 


February, . 


















140,596,400 


943,400 


149 


March, . 


















124,446,600 


944.910 


132 


April, . 


















123,964,500 


937,530 


132 


May, 


















125,802.100 


938,010 


134 


June, 


















133,423.500 


942,330 


142 


July, . 


















131,726,500 


945,510 


139 


August, 


















122,514,500 


947,370 


129 


September, 


















122,966,300 


948,530 


130 


October, 


















119,139,500 


947,490 


126 


November, 


















113,256,700 


948,150 


119 


December, . 










120,210,500 


950,110 


126 


For the y 


ear, 
















125,441,000 


945,360 


133 



In addition to the above quantities, the United States Government Reservation on Peddockt 
Island was supplied with 22,553,000 gallons, equivalent to a daily average rate of 61,600 gallons. 



Table No. 21. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water, in 
Gallons, from the Low-service System in 1908. 







Southern 


Northern 






Low Service. 


Low Service. 






Boston, 

excluding 

East Boston 

and 
Charlestown. 


Portions of Charles- 


Total 


Month. 


town, Somerville, 


Low-service 




Chelsea, Everett, 
Maiden, Medford, 


Consumption. 




East Boston and 
Arlington. 




January, 


54,019,700 


29,981,500 


84,001,200 


February, . 














59.602,000 


34,762,000 


94,364,000 


March, 














53,261,900 


28,444,600 


81,706,500 


April, 














51,102,300 


29,466,900 


80,569,200 


May, . 














51,356,100 


28,228,000 


79,584,100 


June, . 














51,692,100 


30,257,000 


81,949,100 


July, . 














51,242,300 


30,227,700 


81,470,000 


August, 














49,208,700 


27,994,800 


77,203,500 


September, 














49,273,(100 


27,169,000 


76,442,000 


October, 














48,3b4,900 


25,815,300 


74,180,200 


.November. H 














46,394,300 


24,565,000 


70,959,300 


December, 


50,420,600 


26,129,400 


76,550,000 




51,313,600 


28,574,700 


79,888,300 



198 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 22. — (Meter Basis.) Average Daily Consumption of Water, in 
Gallons, from the High-service and Extra High-service Systems in 1908. 




No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



199 












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METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 24. — (Pump Basis.) Consumption of Water in the Metropolitan 
Water District, as constituted in the Year 1908, the Town of Swampscott and 
a Small Section of the Town of Saugus, from 1893 to 1908. 

[Gallons per day.] 



Monti 


[. 1893. 


1894. 


1895. | 1896. 1897. 


1898. 


1899. 


1900. 


January, 


. 75,209,000 


67,506,000 


68,925,000 


82,946,000 


85,366,000 


83,880,000 


96,442,000 


100,055,000 


February, 


. 71,900,000 


68,944,000 


80,375,000 


87,021,000 


83,967,000 


87,475,000 


103,454,000 


98,945,000 


March, 


. 67,638,000 


62,710,000 


69,543,000 


86,111,000 


82,751,000 


85,46S,000 


90,200,000 


97,753,000 


April, 


. 62,309,000 


57,715,000 


62,909,000 


77,529,000 


79,914,000 


76,574,000 


86,491,000 


89,497,000 


May, . 


. 61,025,000 


60,676,000 


65,194,000 


73,402,000 


76,772,000 


76,677,000 


89,448,000 


87,780,000 


June, . 


. 63,374,000 


68,329,000 


69,905,000 


77,639,000 


77,952,000 


83,463,000 


97,691,000 98,581,000 


July, . 


. 69,343,000 


73,642,000 


69,667,000 


80,000,000 


85,525,000 


88,22S,000 


96,821,0001 107,786,000 


August, 


. 66,983,000 


67,995,000 


72,233,000 


78,537,000 84,103,000 


87,558,000 


92,072,000 102,717,000 


September 


, . 64,654,000 


67,137,000 


73,724,000 


74,160,000 84,296,000 


8S,296,000 


91,478,000 103,612,000 


October, 


. 63,770,000 


62,735,000 


67,028,000 


71,762,000 79,551,000 


81,770,000 


89,580,000 


98,358,000 


November, 


. 61,204,000 


62,231,000 


64,881,000 


71,933,000 72,762,000 


7S,177,000 


86,719,000 


93,648,000 


December, 


. 66,700,000 


65,108,000 


70,443,000 


79,449,000 


76,594,000 


86,355,000 


85,840,000 


97,844,000 


Averag 


e, . 66,165,000 


65,382,000 


69,499,000 


78,360,000 


80,793,000 


83,651,000 


92,111,000 


98,059,000 


Population 


, . 723,153 


743,354 


763,557 


786,385 


809,213 


832,042 


854,870 877,698 


Per capita 


91.5 


88.0 


91.0 


99.7 


99.8 


100.5 


107.8 111.7 



Month. 


1901. 


1902. 


1903. 


1904. 


1905. 


1906. 


1907. 


1908. 


January, 
February, . 
March, 
April, . 
May, . 
June, . 
July, . . 
August, 
September, . 
October, 
November, . 
December, . 


111,275,000 
117,497,000 
105,509,000 
93,317,000 
95,567,000 
103,420,000 
106,905,000 
102,815,000 
102,103,000 
103,389,000 
101,324,000 
113,268,000 


118,435,000 
117,268,000 
108,461,000 
103,153,000 
106,692,000 
110,002,000 
108,340,000 
107,045,000 
107,752,000 
106,560,000 
105,175,000 
125,434,000 


125,176,000 
122,728,000 
111,977,000 
107,179,000 
111,589,000 
105,590,000 
107,562,000 
103,570,000 
106,772,000 
103,602,000 
103,477,000 
114,721,000 


137,771,000 
143,222,000 
123,334,000 
108,688,000 
111,715,000 
111,209,000 
113,584,000 
112,836,000 
114,188,000 
108,290,000 
108,054,000 
125,119,000 


130,878,000 
140,595,000 
120,879,000 
111,898,000 
115,804,000 
117,441,000 
124,769,000 
121,15S,000 
120,103,000 
118,301,000 
116,693,000 
122,696,000 

121,671,000 

953,556 

127.6 


126,093,000 
130,766,000 
123,570,000 
118,428,000 
122,404,000 
121,882,000 
118,726,000 
120,591,000 
121,685,000 
116,561,000 
113,746,000 
130,995,000 

122,085,000 

965,990 

126.4 


137,730,000 
150,822,000 
134,202,000 
121,556,000 
123,502,000 
125,623,000 
128,779,000 
131,098,000 
124,751,000 
124,051,000 
119,627,000 
122,407,000 


132,376,000 
146,199,000 
12S,8S4,000 
128,926,000 
131,040,000 
139,843,000 
138,232,000 
128,073,000 
129,972,000 
124,1S9,000 
117,119,000 
124,468,000 


Average, 
Population, 
Per capita, . 


104,645,000 
892,740 
117.2 


110,345,000 
907,780 
121.6 


110,277,000 
922,820 
1-19.5 


118,114,000 
937,860 
125.9 


128,561,000 
986,680 
130.3 


130,712,000 
995,010 
131.4 



This table includes the water consumed in the cities and towns enumerated in Table No. 20, 
together with the water consumed in Newton and Hyde Park, which are included in the Metro- 
politan Water District, but have not been supplied from the Metropolitan Works. Thepopulatious 
for the years 1901 to 1904 were revised after the census of 1905 became available, and consequently 
the figures in the reports after 1904 differ from those published in a corresponding table in the 
preceding annual reports. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



209 



Table No. 31. — Chemical Examinations of Water from a Faucet in Boston, 

from 1892 to 1908. 

[Parts per 100,000.] 





Color. 


Residue on 
Evaporation, 


Ammonia. 


o 

s 

p 


Nitrogen as 


•6 

CD 

a 

SJ 

CO 

CI 

o 
o 

PI 

bo 

>> 
o 




Year. 


u 
c3 


u 

.9-3 

cS 


o 
H 


Loss on 

Ignition. 


CD 

CD 
U 


ALBUMINOID. 


u 


to 

+3 




"e3 
O 

H 


13 

> 

i! 

ft 


CD 
CQ 


to 

CO 
CD 

a 

f-i 

c8 

K 


1892, . 


.37 


37 


4.70 


1.67 


.0007 


.0168 


.0138 


.0030 


.41 


.0210 


.0001 


- 


1.9 


1893, . 


.61 


53 


4.54 


1.84 


.0010 


.0174 


.0147 


.0027 


.38 


.0143 


.0001 


.60 


1.8 


1894, . 


.69 


58 


4.64 


1.83 


.0006 


.0169 


.0150 


.0019 


.41 


.0106 


.0001 


.63 


1.7 


1895, . . . 


.72 


59 


4.90 


2.02 


.0006 


.0197 


.0175 


.0022 


.40 


.0171 


.0001 


.69 


0.7 


1896, . 


.49 


45 


4.29 


1.67 


.0005 


.0165 


.0142 


.0023 


.37 


.0155 


.0001 


.56 


1.4 


1897, . 


.65 


55 


4.82 


1.84 


.0009 


.0193 


.0177 


.0016 


.40 


.0137 


.0001 


.64 


1.6 


1898, . 


.41 


40 


4.19 


1.60 


.ooos 


.0152 


.0136 


.0016 


.29 


.0097 


.0001 


.44 


1.4 


1899, . . . 


.23 


28 


3.70 


1.30 


.0006 


.0136 


.0122 


.0014 


.24 


.0137 


.0001 


.35 


1.1 


1900, . 


.24 


29 


3.80 


1.20 


.0012 


.0157 


.0139 


.0018 


.25 


.0076 


.0001 


.38 


1.3 


1901, . 


.24 


29 


4.43 


1.64 


.0013 


.0158 


.0142 


.0016 


.30 


.0173 


.0001 


.42 


1.7 


1902, . 


.26 


30 


3.93 


1.56 


.0016 


.0139 


.0119 


.0020 


.29 


.0092 


.0000 


.40 


1.8 


1903, . 


.25 


29 


3.98 


1.50 


.0013 


.0125 


.0110 


.0015 


.30 


.0142 


.0001 


.39 


1.5 


1904, . 


- 


23 


3.93 


1.59 


.0023 


.0139 


.0121 


.0018 


.34 


.0110 


.0001 


.37 


1.5 


1905, . 


- 


24 


3.86 


1.59 


.0020 


.0145 


.0124 


.0021 


.35 


.0083 


.0001 


.35 


1.4 


1906, . 


- 


24 


3.86 


1.39 


.0018 


.0159 


.0134 


.0025 


.34 


.0054 


.0001 


.36 


1.3 


1907, . 


- 


22 


3.83 


1.40 


.0013 


.0129 


.0109 


.0020 


.33 


.0068 


.0001 


.32 


1.3 


1908, . 


- 


19 


3.50 


1.35 


.0011 


.0115 


.0092 


.0024 


.33 


.0092 


.0001 


.26 


1.2 



Note relating to Chemical Examinations of Water, Tables Nos. 25-31. 
The chemical examinations contained in the tables were made by the 
State Board of Health. Previous to the year 1904 colors were deter- 
mined by the Nessler standard, but the corresponding values by the 
platinum standard are also given, for the purpose of comparison with 
colors determined in the laboratory of the Metropolitan Water and 
Sewerage Board, as given in subsequent tables. The odor recorded is 
taken in such a way that it is a much stronger odor than would be 
noticed in samples drawn directly from a tap or collected directly from 
a reservoir. The important samples are collected and examined semi- 
monthly or monthly. 



210 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 32. — Colors of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan Water 
Works in 1908. {Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[Platinum Standard.] 

























Framingham 










Wachusett Reservoir. 


: 


Sudbury 
Reservoir. 


Reservoirs. 


Lake Cc 


CHITUATE. 




No. 2. 


No, 3. 




Month. 




42 




OC 




<4 
a) 
> 

n2 




rfl 




a 

CD 

Or-; 


42 


rfl 
42 




A 




DO 

a 

e3 
CD 




ID 


01 


fl 


02 ^j 


o 


o3 


<D 




Fl 


■« 9 

o fl 


CD 


Oh 


CD 


fl, 

CD 


A, 


fl02 




03 


73 


o 


o S 


CD 


t4 


03 


-d 


o 


03 


73 


73 


CS 


73 


O 


CD 




U 

fl 
CO 


73 


42 

o 

m 


£U2 




42 

02 


fl 
OS 


73 


+3 
42 

o 
M 


is 


73 


73 


3 

02 


73 


42 

42 

o 

m 


tfl 

fl 


January, . 


29 


28 


29 


42 


44 


40 


30 


30 


30 


62 


72 


31 


32 


31 


31 


79 


February, . 


28 


28 


29 


37 


40 


36 


31 


31 


31 


33 


66 


31 


33 


33 


37 


64 


March, 


24 


24 


24 


30 


32 


29 


26 


26 


26 


30 


53 


26 


34 


34 


38 


67 


April, 


22 


22 


23 


29 


35 


31 


23 


24 


24 


26 


63 


24 


34 


35 


36 


88 


May, . . . 


21 


21 


21 


38 


52 


47 


23 


23 


23 


24 


77 


23 


34 


37 


38 


138 


June, . 


21 


21 


22 


35 


59 


53 


23 


23 


23 


25 


106 


22 


31 


36 


59 


141 


July, . 


20 


20 


21 


22 


45 


33 


20 


21 


21 


21 


95 


21 


29 


36 


121 


107 


August, 


IS 


19 


21 


23 


56 


36 


19 


19 


21 


21 


80 


19 


24 


36 


182 


80 


September, 


16 


18 


22 


20 


41 


32 


17 


17 


21 


20 


72 


17 


23 


42 


211 


56 


October, . 


15 


15 


19 


17 


36 


26 


16 


16 


17 


17 


62 


16 


23 


32 


232 


51 


November, 


13 


14 


14 


15 


33 


34 


14 


14 


15 


15 


51 


15 


27 


27 


114 


42 


December, 


14 


15 


15 


21 


49 


36 


16 


16 


17 


16 


50 


16 


29 
29 


28 
34 


28 
94 


46 


Mean, . 


20 


20 


22 


27 


44 


36 


22 


22 


22 


26 


71 


22 


80 



1 The colors given in this column represent the combined colors of the waters of the four prin- 
cipal feeders. The color of each is determined monthly, and due weight is given, in combining 
the results, to the sizes of the streams. 



Table No. 32 — Concluded. 

[Platinum Standard.] 





Chestnut '. 


Bill 


Spot 


Fells 


Northern 


Southern 




Reservoir. 


Pond. 


Reservoir. 


Service. 


Sep. 1 


flCE. 


Month. 


42 

(-. 73 

r-j ID 

73 & 

&** 

42 
CD 

a 

H 


CD 
42 

eg 

42 

CJ 42 

° 2 

— -73 

CD 

42 o< 

2< 


6 

£ CD 

og 

CD 

fl 


rfl 
42 
P< 

CD 
73 

73 


CD 

on 

fl 
© 

rfl 

i 

42 

03 

42<2 

fl 

CD 

fl 

50 


ap at Glenwood 
Yard, Medf ord 
(Low Service) . 


ap at Fire Station, 
Hancock Street, 
Everett (High 
Service) . 


ap at 244 Boylston 
Street, Boston 
(Low Service). 


ap at 1 Ashburton 
Place, Boston 
(High Service). 




hH 


w 


i 


W 


H 


H 


H 


H 


January, . 


31 


30 


30 


15 


15 


30 


15 


29 


30 


February, . 






31 


32 


31 


16 


16 


30 


16 


29 


30 


March, 






26 


- 


26 


14 


14 


25 


14 


25 


25 


April, 






24 




24 


15 


15 


24 


14 


23 


24 


May, . 






23 


- 


23 


14 


14 


23 


14 


23 


23 


June, . 






23 


31 


23 


16 


16 


23 


16 


23 


23 


July, . 






21 


29 


21 


14 


14 


21 


15 


21 


22 


August, 






19 


21 


19 


15 


15 


19 


15 


19 


19 


September, 






17 


- 


17 


14 


14 


17 


14 


17 


17 


October, 






16 


- 


16 


13 


13 


16 


14 


16 


16 


November, 






15 


29 


16 


13 


13 


16 


13 


15 


16 


December, 






16 


28 


16 


14 

14 


14 


16 


14 


15 


16 


Mean, . 






22 


29 


22 


14 


22 


15 


21 


22 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



211 



Table No. 33. — Temperatures of Water from Various Parts of the Metropolitan 
Water Works in 1908. (Means of Weekly Determinations.) 

[The temperatures are taken at the same places and times as the samples for microscopical exami- 
nation; the depth given for each reservoir is the depth from high-water mark.] 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 











Sudbury 


ilESERVOIR 


Framingham Reser- 


Lake 


COCHITUATE 




"Wachusett 


(Depth at 


Place of 


voir No. 3 (Depth 


(Depth at Place 




Reservoir. 




Observation 




at Place of Obser- 


of Observation 












54.5 Feet). 




vation 


20.5 Feet). 


62.0 Feet). 


Month. 




A 






A 




a 

® . 
p<— < 










A 

43 






CD 
O 


a. 

CD 
13 


S 
o 


CD 
O 


Pi 
CD 
13 


a 

o 


<4-l S 

O CS 


CD 
O 
C3 


a, 

CD 

T3 


g 

o 


CD 
U 

a 


a. 

CD 
13 


a 

o 




«H 


•n 


43 

43 


=M 


13 


43 

43 


*.£ 




13 


43 
+3 


U 


13 


43 

43 




9 
xo 


S 


o 
pq 


9 

X/1 


u 


o 
pq 


a^ 


9 
m 


% 


o 
pq 


9 
X/1 


s 


O 

PQ 


January, 


33.3 


34.0 


34.5 


32.9 


33.5 


34.1 


34.1 


34.5 


34.8 


34.8 


33.5 


35.0 


35.5 


February, . 


33.8 


34.8 


35.8 


33.4 


34.0 


34.8 


32.9 


34.9 


35.1 


35.1 


34.4 


34.8 


35.0 


March, 


35.2 


35.8 


37.0 


36.7 


37.3 


37.6 


35.7 


39.3 


38.4 


38.5 


37.8 


37.7 


37.7 


April, . 


40.8 


40.3 


41.5 


45.1 


44.4 


44.3 


42.3 


46.3 


46.8 


46.2 


44.4 


44.3 


44.1 


May, . 


53.3 


50.3 


49.5 


60.8 


55.3 


53.1 


51.4 


61.1 


60.2 


58.3 


59.3 


49.6 


45.3 


June, . 


69.1 


53.4 


50.8 


73.1 


63.5 


59.5 


54.1 


74.4 


73.8 


72.8 


74.7 


52.5 


45.9 


July, . 


75.3 


54.5 


50.8 


76.6 


68.0 


65.3 


57.1 


77.4 


77.4 


76.9 


78.3 


51.3 


47.0 


August, 


73.3 


54.8 


51.0 


73.5 


69.6 


64.9 


58.3 


74.5 


74.4 


73.7 


75.5 


49.8 


45.6 


September, . 


66.8 


57.6 


51.2 


66.1 


64.8 


63.3 


60.2 


66.9 


67.0 


66.4 


67.5 


50.0 


44.5 


October, 


60.5 


58.3 


51.5 


58.0 


58.4 


58.2 


57.5 


57.0 


57.0 


57.0 


59.3 


53.3 


44.8 


November, . 


47.5 


47.4 


47.3 


44.6 


44.6 


44.8 


43.5 


43.6 


43.5 


43.6 


46.4 


46.0 


43.9 


December, . 


38.8 


38.9 


39.0 


36.9 


37.5 


38.3 


38.0 


37.1 


37.1 


37.3 


38.1 


41.8 


41.8 


Mean, . 


52.3 


46.7 


45.0 


53.1 


50.9 


49.9 


47.1 


53.9 


53.8 


53.4 


54.1 


45.5 


42.6 



Table No. 33 — Concluded. 

[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Chestnut 

Hill 
Reservoir. 


Spot Pond (Depth at 

Place of Observation 

28.0 Feet). 


Northern 
Service. 


Southern 
Service. 




<n 








13 i3 
o u 
o o • 


.2 8 M 


a a 

°0 • 


a a 


Month. 


■ £ 




A 

43 




"~02 


43 h ,rt 

4^£K 
X/1 V 


ap at 244 Boyls 
Street, Bost 
(Low Service) 


Ashbur 

Bost 

Service 




43 J3 

a 

CD 

9 


<d 
a 
eS 

u 
9 


p< 

CD 

13 


a 

o 

43 
43 

o 


ap at 
Yard 

(Low 


ap atF 
Hanco 
Evere 
Servic 


ap at 1 
Place, 
(High 




H 


cc 


3 


pq 


H 


H 


H 


H 


January, 


34.6 


33.4 


33.8 


33.8 


38.3 


37.0 


37.3 


38.7 


February, . 






34.6 


33.9 


34.1 


34.3 


37.0 


36.8 


37.4 


37.7 


March, 






39.1 


38.2 


38.2 


38.4 


38.0 


38.4 


40.9 


41.1 


April, . 






46.4 


45.3 


44.9 


44.6 


44.8 


45.3 


48.8 


48.8 


May, . 






57.2 


57.0 


55.8 


54.6 


55.8 


57.0 


59.0 


59.0 


June, . 






71.2 


71.0 


69.7 


59.0 


66.8 


68.2 


70.6 


71.2 


July, . 






76.9 


76.4 


75.6 


65.1 


73.5 


74.0 


72.8 


75.7 


August, 






74.9 


74.4 


74.3 


70.8 


71.9 


72.8 


74.1 


74.6 


September, 






68.2 


67.6 


67.5 


67.5 


66.8 


67.4 


68.3 


67.6 


October, 






59.9 


59.6 


59.6 


59.5 


61.0 


60.8 


60.8 


62.6 


November, . 






45.5 


45.8 


45.8 


45.8 


52.3 


49.8 


48.9 


47.9 


December, . 






38.9 


37.9 


38.2 


38.3 


42.8 


42.6 


42.0 
55.1 


41.8 


Mean, . 






54.0 


53.4 


53.1 


51.0 


54.1 


54.2 


55.6 



212 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 34. — Temperatures of the Air at Three Stations on the Metropolitan 

Water Works in 1908. 
[Degrees Fahrenheit.] 









Chestnut Hill 
Reservoir. 


Framingham. 


Clinton. 


Month. 


a 

3 

i 

X 
c3 

3 


a 

3 

1 

a 


a 
a 

8 


a 

3 

a 

3 


a 

3 

a 
!a 




a 

3 

.1 

H 
eS 

& 


a* 

3 
J 
3 


i 


January", 






55.0 


—2.0 


29.6 


54.0 


—9.0 


28.0 


53.0 


—6.0 


26.3 


February, 






58.0 


—3.0 


25.7 


55.0 


—10.0 


22.6 


58.0 


—7.0 


20.8 


March, . 






70.0 


13.0 


38.3 


71.0 


7.0 


35.8 


70.0 


10.0 


33.5 


April, 






85.0 


21.0 


47.4 


85.0 


14.0 


45.3 


84.0 


13.0 


44.2 


May, 






88.0 


35.0 


60.1 


87.0 


30.0 


57.9 


85.0 


34.0 


58.3 


June, 






91.0 


41.0 


69.6 


91.0 


36.0 


66.7 


90.0 


38.0 


67.9 


July, 






101.0 


49.0 


76.1 


99.0 


42.0 


72.4 


95.0 


52.0 


73.4 


August, . 






91.0 


40.0 


69.4 


90.0 


34.0 


66.0 


88.0 


40.0 


66.5 


September, 






88.0 


38.0 


65.3 


85.0 


31.0 


61.4 


85.0 


32.0 


63.4 


October, . 






84.0 


26.0 


55.1 


82.0 


24.0 


52.8 


84.0 


21.0 


52.1 


November, 






62.0 


21.0 


41.4 


61.0 


21.0 


40.3 


60.0 


19.0 


38.3 


December, 






66.0 


7.0 


31.8 


60.0 


5.0 


29.9 


63.0 


2.0 


27.7 


Average, 


- 


- 


50.8 


- 


- 


48.3 


- 


- 


47.7 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



213 



8 

o 

a, 



5si 

rO 

° 00 
g OS 

8 ^ 

1 1 



8 

Co .- 



co 






^ 



o <; 

CO i>» 

•^ 8 

° 8 

*8 

•<s> 

o 

CO 

t >; 

rO 

8 



CO 

6 

H 

PQ 
< 







co 


t- 


o 


lO 


t^ 


■<* 


-* 


CX 


1 




(M 


M< 


43 


CO 


CO 


>* 


O^ 






CO 






OS 


t- 


■<* 


OS 


CO 


(N 


CN 






r-( 






OS 


CO 


o« 






























H 


<N 






■«* 












CO 






■* 


















•fl" 










Tt* 


















tH 










t— 


m 


1 


CO 


<M 


i 


<H 


, 


1 


co 


l^ 


1 




© 




1— 1 




CO 












o 


i— 1 






CO 


















OS 












• 
















iO 








CO 


lO 


1 


1 


1 


i 


iO 


1 


1 


00 










CO 


I— 1 
















Oi 


1—1 






3D 


co^ 


















CO 








O 


■«* 


CO 


1 


t- 


1 


i 


CO 


i—l 


, 


oo 


CN 


1 




1— I 












(M 






as 


1—1 






H 


CO 


















o 








t- 


-# 


OS 


o 


r- 1 


i 


r-i 


I-H 


1 


CO 


-* 


OS 




W 


co 


t- 




I— 1 












CO 


t- 






-*l 


















"^i. 








IN 


cf 

rH 


















1—1 






>* 


CO 


1—1 


1 


1 


1 


, 


1 


1 


1 


CO 


1—1 


1 




CI 


















CN 






M 


H 




























w 


CN 


cs 


CO 


r-i 


i 


1 


1 


, 


00 


CO 


OS 


H 


© 


CO 


CO 


<N 


CO 












■<* 


CO 


CI 


K 


*o. 






•<* 












o 








H 


-#" 


















»n 








IO 


















m 






i— ( 






























o 


t~ 


-* 


■* 


1 


i 


■* 


1 


1 


o 


t- 


-* 




© 


CO 


co 


CO 














CO 


CO 


CO 


03 


CN. 


















CM 






H 
ft 


91 


t-^ 


















t-^ 










iO 


















iO 






5 

& 






























-* 


OS 


OS 


, 


1 


i 


, 


1 


1 


-* 


OS 


Cs 


o 


* 




CO 


1-1 














IO 

CO 


CO 


1-1 


PS 
H 


W 


co" 


















co~ 








^* 


















-* 






M 































CN 


CO 


"* 


m 


1 


i 


1 


1 


1 


i^ 


oo 


1* 


e 


CN 

CO 


CN 
















co" 


CM 








Ol 


















CM 








CO 


i— I 


iO 


CO 


1 


i 


00 


1 


1 


CO 


rH 


m 




© 


CO 


"<* 


CO 


CS 






OS 






CO 


Ml 


CO 




co_ 


















t^ 








M 


^H 


















co" 








lO 


1 


co 


1 


1 


i 


1 


| 


1 


m 


1 


CO 




« 


t~ 


















t~ 








o 


















G^ 








<* 


ocf 


















CO 










co 


CN 


(M 


ex 


co 


-* 


rH 


1 


1 


-«» 


in 


CO 




OK) 


CO 


-<* 


o 


CO 






r-l 






CO 


■* 


o 








r-i 


^ 












co 




T-H 




<* 


i— 1 






eo" 












-<* 

iH 








OS 


1 


lO 


i 


I 


i 


1 


1 


1 


OS 


, 


m 




© 


CO 


















CO 








o 


















c_ 








© 


cf 


















oT 










^r 




























-*» 




























CP 




























CP 




























«W 


















■u 




























CP 










00 

o 


















CP 










OS 










































































o 










I— 1 


















OS 










h 


















1— 1 










3 






-w 






















5 












-u 






^ 










cS 












CP 






3 










•-5 






00 






CP 
















d 

co 






o 
























OS 

1— 1 






CO 

o 






■-3 










53 













OS 






d 










CP 

a 

O 


. 








bo 


• 


• 


CP 

oS 










-c 






-d 






'S 






S 












CP 




S 


CP~ 






CP 




ft 

o 


CP 








d 


g 


CP 


3 


g 


oT 


T3 


g 


CP 


■d 


g 

oS 

OQ 


qT 






0) 

c 


OS 

w 


g 
OS 


"3 


oS 

OQ 


g 

oS 


CP 

s 
o 


oS 

02 


g 

oS 


83 


g 

oS 






a 


OQ 


u 

o 


1=1 


CQ 


a 


CQ 


d 


a 


OQ 






o 


.r-C 


M 


*PH 


c 


& 


.im 


B 


CP 




a 






.a 


OQ 




s 


m 




03 


OQ 




a 


GQ 








bo 


CP 


OQ 

0) 


3 


CP 

> 


OQ 

CP 


^2 
OS 


CP 


w 

CP 


o 

.a 


CP 


m 

CP 






S 
<D 


'3 


► 


ij 


3 


> 


3 


> 


3 


> 








t> 


3 


•*^ 


> 


3 


-4^ 


> 


3 


> 


3 






"3 


a 


> 


bo 


CP 


k 


bO 


CP 


> 


bO 


CP 


> 






-»-i 


-u 




a 


-*— 




a 




u 


S3 


+i 


u 






o 


as 




CP 


oS 




CP 


eS 




CP 


03 






H 


o 


<l 


^ 


O 


<^ 


rl 


O 


< 


^ 


O 


< 



214 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 












o 

Sin 

O 



O 

"a 






Os 






1-H 

GO 



"« 
8 

e 






cq 



8 
© 






<3 



CO 
CO 

6 

H 

m 
< 





13 

43 


00 


<M 




(M 


OS 




O 


l^ 


1— 1 




H 


i— 1 








• 








t~ 


00 




* 


CO 
I— 1 


CO 






r-T 








05 


CO 




(0 


00 
CO_ 


lO 






lO 


I— 1 




3D 


co 




CO 








H 

K 














u 








fc 








M 




co 


I— 1 


g 


© 


(r- 




H 


rH 




CO 








H 








cm 
















Ph 








fe 








o 




os 


00 


03 


w 


00 


t- 


H 


"*. 




EH 




■"# 




w 








a 








■< 














n 












© 


00 




C 


»o 


r-> 




H 








© 


CO 
OS 


1 




« 


CX 


/ 






ex 


1 




«# 


lO 






W 


CO 








• 


• 














-U 








CD 








cu 








«t-l 








"~^ 


„ 






00 


00 






o 


o 






C3 


OS 








i— 1 
















T— 1 






CO 


CO 






^ 


u 






03 


CD 






,Q 


.o 






£ 


S 






cd 


CD 






o 


CD 






CD 


CD 









A 






CD 


CD 






co 


CO 






3 


3, 






c 


V 
















CD 






•*-» 


CD 






ho 


> 






a 

CD 


"3 














OS 


e3 














o 


O 






H 


H 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



215 









t3 



§■ 

CO 
CO 

*c3 
53 



so oi 

§ 1! 






CJ 



6h 









6 

W 
< 

Eh 



o 







>o 


OS 


o 


— 


CI 


l-H 


iM 


ce 


eo 


o 


o 


X 


Cl 


i - 


"* 


ee 


Cl 


eo 


ex | 




lO 




<D 


to 


-* 


-T 


eo 


eo 


eo 


"X, 


CO 


'X. 


lO 


-r 


iO 


t- 


o 


Cl 


ir- 


Cl 


iO 


o 




X 




® 


■** 


^i 


l^ 


— 


c 


■o 


1- 


■<*! 


tr- 


cc 


Cl 


ec 


o 


-- 


Cl 


es 


C-l 


CO 




• 


X 






X 


IO 


00 


oo 


T 


■* 




»o 


-* 


eo 


eo 


ec 


-r 


(M 


Cl 


Cl 


Cl 


— 






eo 


< 


s 




t- 






































iO_ 




■<* 


t^ 


ce 


os 


1- 


■>* 


CO 


CTi 


L- 


X 


ee 


*o 


Cl 


X 


cc 


ee 


-* 


X 


X 


X 




c 




o> 


CO 


X 


cc 


OS 


cc 




CM 


l~ 






tH 


r- 


•o 






eo 






-* 




E-i 


-»J 


®. 


X 


«* 


c; 


00 


CI 


IO 


CO 




Cl 


ee 




CS 


eo 


-r 


ec 


eo 


Ci 




iO 
















































<0 


eo 


r— 




>o 


cT 


os 


CO 


00 


e>i 






CC 


-r 


t^ 


tr- 




t- 


I- 


o~ 


eo 






© 


-*l 


CC 


CO 


— ■ 




cc 


H 


X 


IO 


re 


t- 


r. 




cc 




ee 




X 


ee 


X 






fe 


"* 


OS 

eo" 


T 


-T 


CI 


CI 


>o 


a 


Cl 


Cl 






CX 






i— i 








CO 












-— 


CO 


:c 


,-H 


— 


cc 


— i 


cc 


CO 


-* 


ex 


ee 


cs 


'X, 


CC 


o 


er. 


O 


r* 


o 








-r 


.c 


«o 








oa 


cc 


tr- 


ee 




CJ 


ee 


cc 


X 


ee 


ire 




t-- 


t~ 




* 


1 


CC 


"* 


i— ( 


t- 


X 


oo 


Cl 


ia 


ee 


eo 


30 


eo^ 


eo 


-— 


Cl 


t- 


O 




est 














































t— 






ef 


o 


-r 


00 


o 


o 


eo 


Cl 


Cl 


Cl 


60 


io" 


•* 


CC 




cc 


X 


cc 


-* 


ex 








CO 


<N 


CO 




cc 


c 


ec 


IO 


t- 


H 


Cl 


I-l 


t- 


1-1 




eo 


eo 




t- 

CO 


















CO 


























X 


X 




» 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


OS 


I 


i 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


I 


1 


1 


-* 


o 




CO 


o» 


IO 


CI 


I- 


CO 


-r 


ce 


Cl 


ee 


ec 


35 


Cl 


IO 


ee 


ee 


o 


ee 


lO 


t^ 


eo 






© 


t- 


C) 


■* 


Ir- 


tr- 


Cl 


Cl 


cc 


b- 


'C 


ie 


ee 


■* 


ia 


ee 


X 


— 


-* 


X 










C5 


o 


iO 


OS 


ee; 




o 


ce 


eo 


35 


— 


X 


o 


i- 


X 


ee 


tr- 


eo 






















































CS 




CI 


o 




-r 




CO 




CO 


CJ 


iO 


-r 




ee 








Cl 


c< 


CO 


cs 






oo 


o 


s 


eo 


eo 


cc 


ce 


ex 






X 




eo 


ee 


tr- 




cc 


lO 


eo 


iO 








°i 


C>1 


CN 


H 


r-i 


CJ 


i — i 


1—1 




rH 




f-H 














i—i 










— 




































eo" 


















— 


























-* 


os 




i> 




1 


1 


1 




1 


— 


I 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


i 


1 




1 


1 


i 


cs 




























































































o 




00 


. — 


-T 


CJ 


38 


cc 


CC 


Cl 


OS 


IO 


^^ 


tr- 


ee 


05 


■re 


ee 


ee 


ee 


X 


X 


cs 






CX 


eo 


00 


CO 


O 


o 


t- 


00 


— 


»o 




OS 


s 


-r 


tr- 


cc 


ee 


ee 


CO 


X 


CO 






CO 


ec 


IO 


oo 


o 


o 


so 


ee 


©* 


eo 


IO 


■■* 


cc 


eo 


ee 


~r 


X. 


X 


t- 






















































* 


iH 


-r 


M3 


eo 


r- 


cr 


cc 


eo 


-r 


t- 








Cl 


Cl 


tH 


X 


■«* 






ex 






Cl 


OS 


L- 


CI 


CI 


— . 


t- 


Cl 


r-l 


H 


CC 


"* 


Cl 




i— 1 








*1 


ex 


















































x 


CC 


M 


-r 


eo 


X 


re 


oo 


-r 


ee 


— 


^H 


-r 


CO 


,~ 


Cl 


— 


o 


eo 


1—1 


cs 






C5 


tr- 


T-( 


— 


<M 


— 


re 


CO 


r. 


IO 


-ti 


Cl 


IO 


CC 


ci 


ee 


ee 


IO 


CO 


o 


l- 




o 


IO 


cc 


CI 




X 


eo 




L- 


tr- 


o 


ee 


eo 


ee^ 


CO 


t- 


L- 


CO 


IO 




ex 
















































o 




H 




i— i 


C5 


t- 




OS 


<N 


t- 


io 


I- 


— 






eo" 


-rr" 


Cl 


Cl 


ft 


tr- 


C-T 


o 








t~- 


-T 


*» 


eo 


eo 


CC' 


cc 


H 


— 




<N 








l-l 






I-H 


ys 


1—1 








"* 




































UO 






CO 


-r 


, — i 


CO 




o 


T 


Cl 


ce 


o 


ee 


— 


t- 


ee 


iO 


— 


o 


ee 


(Cl 


X 


IM 






eo 


© 


IO 






t- 


o 


us 


Cl 


re 


lO 


O 


cc 




Cl 


X 


ee 


IG 


tr- 




CO 






»* 


•0 


CO 


CI 


I 


lO 




— 


ec 


(M 


cs 


X 


-T ■ 


o 


lO 


eo 




i— 1 


O 


•«* 






« 
















































-r 


o 


-r 




»o 


CO 






IO 


uC 


H 


Cl 


<* 


T 


cT 


ee 




Ol 


o 


cs 




N 


1—1 


Cl 

ffl. 


oo 


co 






«N 


Cl 


ci 


l-H 




eo 


<M 














X 


ex 


















































I— 1 




































1-1 






CO 




i~ 


CI 




•- 




00 


a 


re 


i - 




— 














© 


ex 






ex 




eo 


IO 




o 




OS 


Cl 


ee 


t^ 




-«* 














CO 






* 




1 


o 


— 


1 


X 


1 


IO 


ec 


tr- 


X 


I 




I 


1 


I 


1 


1 


1 
















































os 




rt 






00 


OS 








w 


Cl 


io 


(H 


















X 






x 


ec 


1 - 




~ 


cc 


Cl 


| -; 


cc 


ee 


ee 




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216 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Table No. 38. — Number of Service Pipes, Meters and Fire Hydrants in the 
Several Cities and Towns supplied by the Metropolitan Water Works, Dec. 
81, 1908, and the Number of Services and Meters installed during the Year 
1908. 






City or Town. 


Services. 


Meters. 


Fire 
Hydrants. 


Services 
Installed. 


Meters 
Installed. 


Boston, . 




♦ 




94,960 


5,372 


8,222 


1,177 


182 


Somerville, 










11,817 


4,325 


1,038 


169 


879 


Maiden, . 










7,137 


6,872 


433 


116 


101 


Chelsea, . 










4,000 


1,357 


329 


106 


285 


Ever5tt, . 










5,239 


504 


520 


78 


388 


Quincy, . 










6,403 


1,913 


735 


312 


433 


Medford, 










4,510 


1,495 


525 


132 


953 


Melrose, . 










3,481 


3,481 


309 


52 


2,461 


Revere, 1 . 










3,073 


297 


160 


146 


134 


Watertown, 










1,919 


1,919 


335 


33 


33 


Arlington, 










1,979 


992 


380 


65 


157 


Milton, . 










1,339 


1,339 


330 


54 


54 


Winthrop, 










2,167 


387 


157 


104 


317 


Stoneham, 










1,359 


174 


115 


28 


144 


Belmont, 










835 


835 


168 


57 


57 


Lexington, 










741 


245 


115 


39 


149 


Nahant, . 










420 


130 


75 


10 


40 


Swampseott, 










1,355 


1,209 


133 


53 


317 


Total, 


152,734 


32,846 


14,079 


2,731 


7,084 






i Includes small portion of Saugus. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



217 



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pq 



218. 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



■73 

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No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



219 



Appendix No. 3. 



Water Works Statistics for the Year 1908. 
The Metropolitan Water Works supply the Metropolitan Water Dis- 
trict, which includes the following cities and towns : — 



City or Town. 



Population, 
Census of 1905. 



Estimated 

Population 

July 1, 1908. 



Boston, 

Somerville, 

Maiden, 

Chelsea, 

Newton,i 

Everett, 

Quincy, 

Medford, 

HydePark.i 

Melrose, 

Revere, 

Watertown, 

Arlington, .. 

Milton, 

Winthrop, 

Stoneham, 

Lexington, 

Belmont, 

Nahant, 

Total population of Metropolitan Water District, 

Swampscott,2 

Saugus, 3 



595,380 

69,272 

38,037 

37,289 

36,827 

29,111 

28,076 

19,686 

14,510 

14,295 

12,659 

11,258 

9,668 

7,054 

7,034 

6,332 

4,530 

4,360 

922 




622,760 

74,000 

40,560 

28,600 

39,000 

32,320 

30,430 

21,290 

15,200 

15,110 

14,300 

12,270 

10,460 

7,560 

7,840 

6,630 

5,130 

4,690 

940 



989,090 

5,640 

280 



i No water supplied to these places during the year from Metropolitan Water Works. 

2 Not in the Metropolitan Water District, but has been supplied with water from the Metro- 
politan Water Works. 

3 Only a small portion of Saugus is supplied with water. 



220 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Mode of Supply. 
24 per cent, by gravity. 
76 per cent, by pumping. 

Pumping. 
Chestnut Hill High-service Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company, Quintard 
Iron Works and E. P. Allis Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : New River, Peerless, Barnet, Vul- 
can and Juniata. Anthracite : buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins : 
bituminous $3.93 to $4.18, buckwheat $2.80 to $2.90. Average price 
per gross ton $3.76. Per cent, ashes, 13.3. 

Chestnut Hill Low-service Station: — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Barnet and Vulcan. Anthracite : 
buckwheat. Price per gross ton in bins: bituminous $4.03 to $4.34, buck- 
wheat $2.70. Average price per gross ton $3.70. Per cent, ashes, 12.2. 

Spot Pond Station : — 

Builders of pumping machinery, Geo. F. Blake Manufacturing Company 
and Holly Manufacturing Company. 

Description of coal used : — Bituminous : Davis and Georges Creek Cumber- 
land. Anthracite : screenings. Price per gross ton in bins : bituminous 
$4.14 and $5, screenings $2.24. Average price per gross ton $3.59. Per 
cent, ashes, 13.9. 



Chestnut Hill High-service 
Station. 



Engines 

Nos. 
1 and 2. 



Engine 
No. 3. 



Engine 

No. 4. 



Daily pumping capacity (gallons) 

Coal consumed for year (pounds), 

Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), . 
Average dynamic head (feet), . . . ' . 

Gallons pumped per pound of coal, 

Duty on basis of plunger displacement 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, . . . . 
Cost per million gallons raised one foot 



16,000,000 

4,935,229 

$18,898.24 

2.S14.61 

121.62 

570.31 

59,580,000 

$6,714 

0.055 



20,000,000 

409,193 

$1,286.58 

381.93 

132.94 

933.37 

111,6SO,000 

$3,369 

0.025 



30,000,000 

8,S95,838 

$33,272.92 

10,560.93 

131.09 

1,187.18 

133,630,000 

$3,151 

0.024 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



221 





Chestnut Hill 

Low-sebvice 

Station. 


Spot Pond 
Station. 




Engines Nos. 5, 
6 and 7. 


Engines Nos. 8 
and 9. 


Cost of pumping, figured on pumping station expenses, . 
Total pumpage for year, corrected for slip (million gallons), . 

Cost per million gallons raised to reservoir, 

Cost per million gallons raised one foot, 


105,000,000 

8,507,925 

$35,610.44 

21,844.65 

50.83 

2,567.56 

112,030,000 

$1,630 

0.032 


30,000,000 

2,706,751 

$14,416.75 

3,040.51 

129.92 

1,123.31 

125,380,000 

$4,742 

0.036 



Consumption. 

Estimated total population of the nineteen cities and towns 

supplied wholly or partially during the year 1908, . . 945,360 

Total consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . . . 46,592,170,000 

Average daily consumption (gallons), pump basis, . . 127,301,000 

Gallons per day to each inhabitant, pump basis, . . . 134.7 



Distribution. 



Owned and 

operated 

by Metropolitan 

Water and 
Sewerage Board. 



Total in District 

supplied 

by Metropolitan 

Water Works. 



Kinds of pipe used, 

Sizes, 

Extensions, less length abandoned (miles), 

Length in use (miles), 

Stop gates added 

Stop gates now in use, 

Service pipes added, 

Service pipes now in use, . 

Meters added, 

Meters now in use, 

Fire hydrants added 

Fire hydrants now in use, . 



_ l 

60 to 6 inch. 

.76 

84.65 

5 

372 



60 to 4 inch. 
20.57 
1,568.85 



2,731 

152,734 3 

7,084 

32,846 3 

252 
14,079 



1 Cast-iron and cement-lined wrought iron. 

2 Cast-iron, cement-lined wrought iron and kalamine. 

3 2,709 services and 720 meters destroyed by fire in Chelsea, April 12. 



222 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Appendix No. 4 



Contracts made and pending during 
Contracts relating to the 





1. 

Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 


2. 

WORK. 


3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 


Amount of Bid. 


6. 




4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 


5. 

Lowest. 


Contractor. 


1 

2 
3 


68 

69 
70 


Additions to the pumping 
plant at Deer Island, 
Boston Harbor. 

450 tons, Georges Creek 
Cumberland Coal for 
Alewife Brook pump- 
ing station. 

6,150 tons of coal: — 
2,250 tons for Deer Island 

pumping station. 
3,000 tons for East Bos- 
ton pumping station. 
900 tons for Charlestown 
pumping station. 


4 
5 

i '1 
1 8 i 


$69,230 00 i 

$4.60 per 
ton. 

$4.15 per 
ton.i 

$4.22 per 

ton. 
$4.00 per 

ton. 


$51,990 00 

$4.50 per 
ton.i 

$3.75 per 

ton. 
$3.69 per 

ton.i 
$3.95 per 

ton.i 


Allis-Chalmers Co., 
Milwaukee, Wis. 

Locke Coal Co., Mai- 
den. 

Davis Coal & Coke 
Co., Boston. 



Contracts relating to the 



60 2 



612 



62 2 



Part of Section 82, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, Brookline, 78- 
inch by 84-inch concrete 
sewer in trench. 

Part of Section 81, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, Brookline, 78- 
inch by 84-inch concrete 
sewer in trench. 

Part of Section 81, Exten- 
sion of the High level 
Sewer, Brookline, 78- 
inch by 84-inch concrete 
sewer "in trench and tun- 
nel. 

Part of Section 83, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
S e w e r, Brookline, 69- 
inch by 72-inch concrete 
sewer in tunnel. 



$30,415 00 



57,450 00 



56,690 00 



59,980 00 



),412 50 i 



56,980 00 i 



53,100 001 



54,672 00 i 



T: J. O'Connell, Bos- 
ton. 



Bruno & Petitti, Bos- 
ton. 



Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Co., Boston. 



T. J. O'Connell, Bos- 
ton. 



i Contract based on this bid. 



2 Contract completed. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



223 



Appendix No. 4. 



the Year 1908 — Sewerage Works. 
North Metropolitan System. 



7. 



Date 

of Contract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



9. 



Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1908. 



10. 

Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1908. 



Nov. 2, 1908, 



July 8, 1908, 



July 13, 1908, 



June 1, 1909, 



June 1, 1909, 



For furnishing and setting up, complete and ready 
to operate, one pumping engine, actuating ver- 
tical shaft and centrifugal pump, with four 
boilers, pipe connections, economizer and all 
necessary fittings, the sum of $69,230. 

$4.50 per ton of 2,240 lbs., delivered in bins. 



4.15 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Deer 
Island pumping station; $3.69 per ton of 2,240 
lbs. delivered in bins at East Boston pumping 
station; $3.95 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in 
bins at Charlestown pumping station. 



$757 82 3 



9,382 55 3 



South Metropolitan System. 



July 9, 1907, Jan. 22, 1908, 



Nov. 23, 1907, 



Nov. 25, 1907, 



Nov. 26, 1907, 



Dec. 14, 1908, 



Aug. 25, 1908, 



June 8, 1908, 



,127 64 



63,891 52 



52,702 82 



55,940 19 



3 Total amount of bills approved by Chief Engineer to Dec. 31, 1908. 



224 



METROPOLITAN WATER 



[Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the 
Contracts relating to the South 



Num- 
ber 
of Con- 
tract. 



631 



64 



651 



661 



G7 



71 



2. 

WORK. 



Part of Section 85, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, B righton , 69- 
inch by 72-inch concrete 
sewer in tunnel. 

Part of Section 85, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, Brighton, 69- 
inch by 72-inch concrete 
sewer in tunnel. 

Part of Section 85, Exten- 
sion of the High-level 
Sewer, Brighton , 69- 
inch by 72-inch concrete 
sewer in tunnel. 

42-inch concrete sewer and 
12-inch pipe sewers, 
along the line of Section 
86, E x t e n s i o n of the 
High-level Sewer, 
Brighton. 



Section 86, Extension of 
the High-level Sewer, 
Brighton, 69-inch by 72- 
inch and 72 inch by 48- 
inch concrete sewers, in 
trench. 



3,400 tons of coal : — 
2,400 tons for Ward Street 

pumping station. 
500 tons for Quincy 

pumping station. 
500 tons for Nut Island 
screen house. 



3. 

Num- 
ber of 
Bids. 



13 



14 



Amount of Bid. 



4. 

Next to Low- 
est. 



$51,056 00 



94,150 00 



71,400 00 



9,766 50 



38,716 00 



1.55 per 

ton. 
4.95 per 

ton. 
1.20 per 

ton .2 



Lowest. 



$50,856 00 2 



92,400 00 2 



67,450 00 2 



8,913 60 2 



38,054 50 2 



4.41 per 

ton .2 
4.45 per 

ton.2 
4.15 per 

ton. 



6. 

Contractor. 



Geo. M. Bryne Com- 
pany, Boston. 



D. F. O'Connell Co., 
Boston. 



Hugh Nawn Contract- 
ing Co., Boston. 



Glenn & Broderick, 
Boston. 



Charles J. Jacobs Co., 
Boston. 



Davis Coal & 
• Co., Boston. 



Coke 



Contract completed. 



2 Contract based on this bid. 



No. 57.] 



AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



225 



Year 1908 — Sewerage Works — Continued. 
Metropolitan System — Concluded. 



7. 



Date 
of Contract. 



8. 

Date of 

Completion of 

Work. 



9. 

Prices of Principal Items of 
Contracts made in 1908. 



10. 

Value of Work 
done Decem- 
ber 31, 1908. 



Nov. 27, 1907, 



Nov. 25, 1907, 



Nov. 25, 1907, 



June 24, 1908, 



Aug. 20, 1908, 



Dec. 9, 1908, 



Dec. 26, 1908, 



Aug. 4, 1908, 



July 13, 1908, 



June 1, 1909, 



For earth excavation and refilling in trench for 
42-inch concrete sewer, $4.25 per lin. ft.; for 
Portland cement brick masonry in manholes, 
$14 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry, in trench, $4.75 per cu. yd. ; for earth 
excavation and refilling, in trench, for 12-inch 
vitrified pipe sewer; $1.49 per lin. ft. ; for rock 
excavation, as found, $4 per cu. yd. 

For earth excavation and refilling, in trench, for 
69-inch by 72-inch concrete sewer, $5.75 per lin. 
ft.; for earth excavation and refilling^ in trench, 
for 72-inch by 48-inch sewer, $4.45 per lin. ft.; 
for Portland cement brick masonry, in trench, 
$14 per cu. yd.; for Portland cement concrete 
masonry, in trench, $6.70 per cu. yd.; for rock 
excavation, $4 per cu. yd. 



$4.41 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Ward 

Street pumping station. 
$4.45 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at 

Quincy pumping station. 
$4.15 per ton of 2,240 lbs. delivered in bins at Nut 

Island screen house. 



$50,170 14 



89,930 00 



68,932 00 



8,911 39 



34,874 76 



5,247 33 s 



3 Total amount of bills approved by Chief Engineer to Dec. 31, 1908. 



226 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



Contracts made and pending during the Year 1908 — Sewerage Works 

— Concluded. 

Summary of Contracts. 1 

Value of "Work 

done December 

31, 1908. 



North Metropolitan System, 1 contract, 
South Metropolitan System, 9 contracts, 



Total of 10 contracts made and pending during the year 1908, 



$458,480 46 



$458,480 46 



i In this summary the cost of day work and contracts charged to maintenance are excluded. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 227 



Appendix No. 5. 



Financial Statement presented to the General Court on Janu- 
ary 18, 1909. 
The Metropolitan Water and Sewerage Board respectfully presents 
the following abstract of the account of its doings, receipts, expendi- 
tures, disbursements, assets and liabilities for the year ending Nov, 30, 
1908, in accordance with the provisions of chapter 235 of the Acts of 
the year 1906. 

Metropolitan Water Works. 
The loans authorized for expenditures under the Metropolitan Water 
acts, the receipts which are added to the loan fund, the expenditures for 
the construction and acquisition of works, and the balance available on 
December 1, 1908, have been as follows: — 

Loans authorized under Metropolitan Water acts, .... $40,898,000 00 

Receipts from the sales of real estate, and from labor, tools - and supplies, 

which are placed to the credit of the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . . $7,654 53 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . 153,682 00 



Amount approved for payment by the Board, out of the Metropolitan 
Water Loan Fund : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . . $206,417 33 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . 40,459,778 07 



161,336 53 



$41,059,336 53 



40,666,195 40 
Balance December 1, 1908, . $393,141 13 

The amount approved by the board for maintenance and operation 
of the Metropolitan Water Works during the year ending Nov. 30, 1908, 
was $417,493.84. 

Sums received from sales of water to municipalities not belonging to 
the District and to water companies, and from municipalities for admis- 
sion to the District, have been applied as follows : — 



228 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

For the period prior to December 1, 1906, distributed to the cities and 
towns of the District, as provided by section 3 of the Metropolitan 
Water Act, $219,865 65 

For the period beginning December 1, 1906, and prior to December 1, 1907, 
applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by- 
chapter 238 of the Acts of 1907, 7,156 43 

For the year beginning December 1, 1907, and ending November 30, 1908, 
applied to the Metropolitan Water Loan Sinking Fund, as provided by 
said last-named act, ......... 6,919 61 



$233,941 69 



The Board has also received the following sums from rentals, land 
products and other sources, which, according to section 18 of the Met- 
ropolitan Water Act, are applied by the Treasurer of the Commonwealth 
to the payment of interest on the Metropolitan Water Loan, to sinking 
fund requirements, and expenses of maintenance and operation of 
works : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, $5,838 78 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, 138,818 19 



$144,656 97 

Metropolitan Sewerage Works. 

The loans authorized under the various acts of the Legislature for 
the construction of the Metropolitan Sewerage Works, the receipts which 
are added to the proceeds of the loans, and the expenditures for con- 
struction, are given below, as follows : — 

North Metropolitan System. 
Loans authorized under the various acts, including those 
for the Revere, Belmont, Maiden extensions and North 
System enlargement, ...... $6,573,869 76 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous 
sources, which are placed to the credit of the North 
Metropolitan System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . . 18,577 77 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . 17,153 40 

Amount approved for payment by the Board * out of the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . . - $19,392 51 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . - 6,146,023 16 



$6,609,600 93 $6,165,415 67 

Balance, North Metropolitan System, December 1, 1908, . . $444,185 26 

1 The word " Board " refers to the Metropolitan Sewerage Commission and the Metropolitan 
Water and Sewerage Board. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 229 

South Metropolitan System. 
Charles River Valley Sewer. 
Loans authorized under the various acts, . . . $800,046 27 

Amount approved by the Metropolitan Sewerage Com- 
mission for payment on account of the Charles River 
valley sewer, - $800,046 27 

Neponset Valley Sewer. 
Loans authorized under the various acts, . . . $904,000 00 

Receipts from pumping, which are placed to the credit of 

the South Metropolitan System, . . . . 109 50 

Amount approved by the Board for payment on account 
of the Neponset valley sewer: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . - - 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . - 911,531 46 

High-level Sewer and Extension. 

Loans authorized under the various acts, . . . 7,163,000 00 

Receipts from sales of real estate and from miscellaneous 
sources, which are placed to the credit of the South 
Metropolitan System: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . . 3,728 97 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . 7,243 25 

Amount approved by the Board for payments on account 
of the High-level Sewer and Extension : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, . . - 568,012 00 

For the period prior to December 1, 1907, . . - 6,439,578 02 



$8,878,127 99 $8,719,167 75 
Balance, South Metropolitan System, December 1, 1908, . . $158,960 24 

For the maintenance and operation of Sewerage Works annual appro- 
priations are made. The balances, appropriations and expenditures for 
the year ending November 30, 1908, are as follows : — 

Maintenance of North Metropolitan System. 
Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1908, .... $186,000 00 
Receipts from pumping and from other sources, which are returned to the 
appropriation: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, ...... 567 02 



$186,567 02 
Amount approved for payment bj'" the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, 166,009 10 



Balance December 1, 1908, ........ $20,557 92 



230 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 

Maintenance of South Metropolitan -System. 

Appropriated for the year ending November 30, 1908, .... 8105,000 00 
Receipts from sales of property and for pumping, which, are returned to the 
appropriation: — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, ...... 129 93 



$105,129 93 
Amount approved for payment by the Board : — 

For the year ending November 30, 1908, ...... 98,588 80 



Balance December 1, 1908, . . . . . . . . §6,541 13 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 231 



Appendix JSTo . 6. 



Legislation of the Year 1908 affecting the Metro- 
politan Water and Sewerage Board. 



ACTS OF 1908. 

[Chapter 23.] 

An Act making an appropriation for the compensation 
. of certain veterans retired from the service of the 
commonwealth. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding twenty thousand dollars Appropriation 
is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of the treasury of the retired 
commonwealth from the ordinary revenue, to provide for the 
compensation of certain veterans formerly in the service of 
the commonwealth and now retired from that service under 
authority of chapter four hundred and fifty-eight of the acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and seven. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved January 27, 1908. 



[Chapter 198.] 

An Act making an appropriation for the maintenance 

of the metropolitan water system. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. A sum not exceeding four hundred and thirty- Appropriation 
three thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out nance of 
of the Metropolitan Water Maintenance Fund, for the mainte- water P system. 
nance and operation of the metropolitan water system for the 
cities and towns in what is known as the metropolitan water 
district, during the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth day of 
November, nineteen hundred and eight. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March 10, 1908. 



232 METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



[Chapter 211.] . 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
north metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
fo? mainte tion Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and forty- 
mSropoiitan 11 s ^ x thousand dollars is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of 
systemf 6 ^ ne North Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund, for the 

maintenance and operation of the system of sewage disposal 
for the cities included in what is known as the north metro- 
politan system, during the fiscal year ending on the thirtieth 
day of November, nineteen hundred and eight. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March Ik, 1908. 



[Chapter 213.] 

An Act making an appropriation for operating the 
south metropolitan system of sewage disposal. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
Appropriation Section 1. A sum not exceeding one hundred and five 

for mamte- ° 

nance of south thousand dollar s is hereby appropriated, to be paid out of the 

metropolitan J x L 1 7 x 

sewerage South Metropolitan System Maintenance Fund, for the cost 

system. r j ? 

of maintenance and operation of the south metropolitan sys- 
tem of sewage disposal, comprising a part of Boston, the cities 
of Newton and Waltham, and the towns of Brookline, Water- 
town, Dedham, Hyde Park and Milton, during the fiscal year 
ending on the thirtieth day of November, nineteen hundred 
and eight. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved March Ik, 1908. 



[Chapter 456.] 

An Act to authorize the town of ashland to supply 
itself and its inhabitants with water. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 
The town of Section 1. The town of Ashland may supply itself and its 

Ashland may > m J x x ^ 

supply itself inhabitants with water for the extinguishment of fires and 

with water, ° 

etc - for domestic, manufacturing and other purposes; may estab- 

lish fountains and hydrants and relocate or discontinue the 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 233 

same; and may regulate the use of such water and fix and 
collect rates to be paid therefor. 

Section 2. Said town, for the purposes aforesaid, may Town may 

-, -, -, , -i i arrange to take 

take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, and hold the waters water from 

■ 71,/ - L p-i-u metropolitan 

of any pond or stream or of any ground sources ot supply, by water system. 
means of driven, artesian or other wells within the limits of 
the town, and the water rights connected with any such water 
sources, or may purchase water from any individual or cor- 
poration ; and may avail itself of its existing rights and privi- 
leges reserved to it by the provisions of chapter one hundred 
and seventy-seven of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
seventy- two : provided, however, that nothing in this act shall 
be construed as increasing such rights and privileges, or may 
make arrangements for obtaining water from the metropoli- 
tan water system which shall be satisfactory to the town and 
to the metropolitan water and sewerage board, and may also 
take, or acquire by purchase or otherwise, and hold all lands, 
rights of way and easements necessary for collecting, storing, 
holding, purifying and preserving the purity of the water and 
for conveying the same to any part of said town: provided, 
that there is no infringement upon the existing rights and 
privileges of the metropolitan water system excepting as 
allowed for above, and provided, that no source of water sup- 
ply and no lands necessary for preserving the quality of such 
water, shall be taken or used without first obtaining the advice 
and approval of the state board of health, . . . 

Section" 10. This act shall take effect upon its acceptance Act shall take 
by a majority vote of the legal voters of the town of Ashland acceptance, 
present and voting thereon at a legal meeting called for the 
purpose within three years after its passage; but the number 
of meetings so called in any one year shall not exceed three; 
and for the purpose of being submitted to the voters as afore- 
said this act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved April 28, 1908. 



[Chapter 539.] 

An Act to provide for the better protection of the 

domestic water supplies of the commonwealth. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Any police officer or constable of a city or town Police officer 

t . -, -, . . -i p ,i or constable or 

m which any pond, stream or reservoir used for the purpose officer of 



234 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



board, etc., if 
duly author- 
ized, may 
arrest for 
bathing. 



of domestic water supply is wholly or partly situated, acting 
within the limits of his city or town, and any executive officer 
of a water board, board of water commissioners, public insti- 
tution or water company, furnishing water for domestic pur- 
poses, or agent of such water board, board of water commis- 
sioners, public institution or water company, duly authorized 
in writing therefor by such boards, institution or company, 
acting upon the premises of such board, institution or com- 
pany and not more than five rods from the water, for such 
supply may, without a warrant, arrest any person found in the 
act of bathing in a pond, stream or reservoir, the water of 
which is used for the purpose aforesaid, and detain him in 
some convenient place until a complaint can be made against 
him therefor. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 26, 1908. 



Appropria- 
tions for 
extension of 
East Boston 
and Deer 
Island pump- 
ing stations. 



Issue of bonds 
authorized. 



[Chapter 556.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO CONSTRUCT EXTENSIONS AND ADDITIONS AT 
THE EAST BOSTON AND DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATIONS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The sums hereinafter mentioned are appro- 
priated, to be paid out of the treasury of the commonwealth 
from the Metropolitan Sewerage Loan Fund, North System, 
for the following purposes : — For the East Boston pumping 
station, to be expended in the years nineteen hundred and 
eight, nineteen hundred and nine and nineteen hundred and 
ten, an amount not exceeding two hundred and fifty thousand 
dollars ; for the Deer Island pumping station, to be expended 
in the years nineteen hundred and eight, nineteen hundred 
and nine and nineteen hundred and ten, a sum not exceeding 
one hundred and ninety-five thousand dollars. 

Section 2. For the above purposes the said board may 
expend any sum heretofore appropriated for the construction 
of the north metropolitan sewerage system, and to meet the 
expenses incurred under the provisions of this act and not so 
provided for the treasurer and receiver general shall, with the 
approval of the governor and council, issue from time to time, 
bonds in the name and behalf of the commonwealth and under 
its seal, to an amount not exceeding four hundred and thirteen 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 235 

thousand dollars, in addition to the amount of such bonds, 
heretofore authorized by law. The provisions of chapter four 
hundred and thirty-nine of the acts of the year eighteen hun- 
dred and eighty-nine and of chapter four hundred and 
twenty-four of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-eight, and of all acts in amendment thereof and in 
addition thereto, shall, so far as they may be applicable, apply 
to the indebtedness authorized by this act. Any premium 
realized from the sale of said bonds shall be paid into the 
Metropolitan Sewerage Loans Sinking Fund and placed to 
the credit of the north metropolitan sewerage system. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 29, 1908. 



[Chapter 558.] 

An Act to authorize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO MAKE CERTAIN IMPROVEMENTS IN THE 
METROPOLITAN WATER WORKS AND TO PROVIDE FOR THE 
PAYMENT OF CLAIMS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The sums hereinafter mentioned are appro- Appropria- 

x tions for 

priated, to be paid out of the treasury of the commonwealth construction 

171 u for certain 

from the Metropolitan Water Loan Fund, for the following purposesm 

r ■ ° metropolitan 

purposes : — For a power plant at the Wachusett dam, a sum ^^\ dist J:i ct 
not exceeding one hundred and fifteen thousand dollars; for ment of claims, 
concrete walls and tile floor at the gate and power house at 
the Wachusett dam, a sum not exceeding seven thousand 
dollars; for a new forty-eight inch main from Chestnut Hill 
reservoir to the Boston city line, a sum not exceeding one hun- 
dred and ninety thousand dollars; for the completion of the 
Arlington pumping station and its equipment, a sum not 
exceeding fourteen thousand five hundred dollars; for the 
construction of sewers, cesspools and other improvements 
necessary on the watershed of the Wachusett reservoir, a sum 
not exceeding five thousand dollars; for settlement of suits 
now pending in the courts, and for claims and reserves pay- 
able upon completed contracts, a sum not exceeding two hun- 
dred and sixty thousand dollars. 

Section 2. For the above purposes the said board may Issue of bonds 
expend any sum heretofore appropriated for the construction autnorized - 
of metropolitan water works, and to meet the expenses in- 



236 



METROPOLITAN WATER [Pub. Doc. 



curred under the provisions of this act and not so provided 
for the treasurer and receiver general shall, from time to time, 
issue upon the request of said board, bonds in the name and 
behalf of the commonwealth and under its seal, designated on 
the face thereof, Metropolitan Water Loan, to an amount not 
exceeding three hundred and ninety-eight thousand dollars in 
addition to the sum of forty million five hundred thousand 
dollars authorized to be issued under the provisions of chapter 
four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-five, chapter four hundred and fifty- 
three of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and one and 
chapter three hundred and sixty-seven of the acts of the year 
nineteen hundred and six, and the provisions of said chapter 
four hundred and eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen 
hundred and ninety-five, and of acts in amendment thereof 
and in addition thereto, shall apply to this additional loan to 
the same extent as if the amount authorized by said act had 
been forty million eight hundred and ninety-eight thousand 
dollars instead of twenty-seven million dollars. 

Section" 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 29, 1908. 



Town of 
Swampscott 
may be 
included in 
metropolitan 
water district. 



[Chapter 560.] 

An Act to authorize the admission of the town of 

swampscott to the metropolitan w t ater district. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The metropolitan water and sewerage board 
may, on application, include the town of Swampscott in the 
metropolitan water district, and may furnish water to the 
town on the terms prescribed by chapter four hundred and 
eighty-eight of the acts of the year eighteen hundred and 
ninety-five, and by acts in amendment thereof and in addi- 
tion thereto for the cities and towns included in said district, 
and on payment of such sum of money as said board may fix. 

Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved May 29, 190S. 



No. 57.] AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 237 

[Chapter 582. J 

An Act to authoeize the metropolitan water and sew- 
erage BOARD TO RESTORE THE EAST BOSTON SEWERAGE 
PUMPING STATION AND TO ERECT OTHER BUILDINGS. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. The sum of forty thousand dollars is hereby Appropriation 

for restoring 

appropriated, to be paid out of the treasury of the common- East Boston 

*■ x x x # sewerage 

wealth from the Metropolitan Sewerage Maintenance Fund, pumping 

st&tion. 

North System, for the restoration of the East Boston sewerage 
pumping station and its equipment, recently damaged by fire. 

Section 2. The metropolitan water and sewerage board is Authority to 
hereby authorized to use any money received from the sale of received from 
land in East Boston to The Standard Oil Company of New 
York, for the purchase of land and the erection of stable and 
locker buildings thereon. 

Section 3. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June J+, 1908. 



[Chapter 650.] 

An Act relative to the weekly payment of wages to 

public employees. 
Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

Section 1. Section sixty-two of chapter one hundred and Act relative to 

J L weekly pay- 

six of the Revised Laws, as amended by chapter four hundred Jo en ubiic Wage9 
and twenty-seven of the acts of the year nineteen hundred and extended 68 
six, and by chapter one hundred and ninety-three of the acts 
of the year nineteen hundred and seven, is hereby further 
amended by inserting after the word " them ", in the seven- 
teenth line, the words : — and every person employed by it or 
them in any penal or charitable institution, — so as to read 
as follows : — Section 62. Every manufacturing, mining, or 
quarrying, mercantile, railroad, street railway, telegraph 
or telephone corporation, every incorporated express company 
or water company, and every contractor, person or partnership 
engaged in any manufacturing business, in any of the build- 
ing trades, in quarries or mines, upon public works or in the 
construction or repair of railroads, street railways, roads, 
bridges or sewers, or of gas, water or electric light works, 
pipes or lines, shall pay weekly each employee engaged in his 



238 WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. [P. D. 57. 

or its business the wages earned by him to within six days of 
the date of said payment, but any employee leaving his or 
her employment, or being discharged from such employment, 
shall be paid in full on the following regular pay day; and the 
commonwealth, its officers, boards and commissions shall so 
pay every mechanic, workman and laborer who is employed 
by it or them, and every person employed by it or them in any 
penal or charitable institution, and every county and city shall 
so pay every employee who is engaged in its business the wages 
or salary earned by him, unless such mechanic, workman, 
laborer or employee requests in writing to be paid in a differ- 
ent manner ; and every town shall so pay each employee in its 
business if so required by him ; but an employee who is absent 
from his regular place of labor at a time fixed for payment 
shall be paid thereafter on demand. The provisions of this 
section shall not apply to an employee of a co-operative cor- 
poration or association if he is a stockholder therein unless 
he requests such corporation to pay him weekly. The board of 
railroad commissioners, after a hearing, may exempt any rail- 
road corporation from paying weekly any of its employees if 
it appears to the board that such employees prefer less fre- 
quent payments, and that their interests and the interests of 
the public will not suffer thereby. No corporation, con- 
tractor, person or partnership shall by a special contract with 
an employee or by any other means exempt himself or itself 
from the provisions of this and the following section. Who- . 
ever violates the provisions of this section shall be punished 
by a fine of not less than ten nor more than fifty dollars. 
Section 2. This act shall take effect upon its passage. 

Approved June 13, 1908. 



Index to Legislation of the Yeak 1908 



AFFECTING THE 



METROPOLITAN WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 



A. 

APPROPRIATIONS. 

for compensation of retired veterans, ....... 

for constructing extensions at East Boston and Deer Island sewerage 
pumping stations, ......... 

for construction for certain purposes in Metropolitan Water Works, 

for maintenance of Metropolitan Water System, 

for maintenance of North Metropolitan Sewerage System, . 

for maintenance of South Metropolitan Sewerage System, . 

for restoring East Boston sewerage pumping station, . 

ASHLAND. 

town of, may arrange to take water from Metropolitan Water System, 



Chap. 


Sect. 


23 


1 


556 


1 


558 


1 


198 


1 


211 


1 


213 


1 


582 


1 


456 1 


2,10 



D. 



DEER ISLAND PUMPING STATION, 
to provide for extension of , . 



556 



E. 

EAST BOSTON PUMPING STATION. 

to provide for extension of, 556 1 

to restore and equip, . . . . . . . . . . 582 1 



EMPLOYEES. 

public, weekly payment of wages to, 



650 



L. 

LOANS. 

for Metropolitan Water Works, .... 
for Metropolitan Sewerage Works, North System, 



558 
556 



M. 

METROPOLITAN 'WATER AND SEWERAGE BOARD. 

may use money from sale of lands to provide stable and locker buildings, . 582 
to construct extensions at Deer Island and East Boston sewerage pumping 

stations, 556 

to construct certain works and pay claims for Metropolitan Water Works, 558 

to restore East Boston sewerage pumping station 582 



240 INDEX. 

METROPOLITAN WATER DISTRICT. Chap. Sect, 

town of Swampscott may be included in, . . . . . . 560 1 

METROPOLITAN WATER SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of ........ . 198 1 

N. 

NORTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, ........ 211 1 

P. 

PROTECTION. 

of water supplies of cities and towns . . . 539 1 

S. 

SOUTH METROPOLITAN SEWERAGE SYSTEM. 

appropriation for maintenance of, ....... 213 1 

STABLE AND LOCKER. 

land and buildings for, may be provided from sale of land in East Boston, 582 2 

SWAMPSCOTT. 

may be included in the Metropolitan Water District, . . . . 560 1 



V. 

VETERANS. 

retired from service of Commonwealth, appropriation for compensation of, 23 1 



W. 
WAGES. 

weekly payment of, to public employees, relative to, . . . . 650 1 

WATER SUPPLIES. 

protection of sources of, .... 539 1